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TESTAMENTA VETUSTA 



VOL, I. 



• ■ ■ • 



Nicbok and Sou, 95» IVirlUment-itrefct. 



I 






wmm^\W?Tf'^'£i 







CeiStamenta Hetusta: 

BEIMO 

ILLUSTRATIONS FROM WILLS, 



MANNERS, CUSTOMS, Ac. 

AS WELL AS OF THE DESCENTS AND POSSESSIONS OF 

MANY DISTIKOUISHED FAMILIES. 



Iftmrp t|)C jfreianfe to t\}t Ztttgfioti ot tStatta 4EIf;abetf) ; 



By NICHOLAS HARRIS NICOLAS, Esq. 

UWi FELLOW or THI fOClITV Of INTHltriUltl. 




LONDON : 

NICHOLS AND SON, PARLIAMENT STREET. 
MDCCCXXVI. 



no 



TO THE MOST IHTOBLE 

BERNARD EDWARD HOWARD, 
DUKE OF NORFOLK, 

EARL OP ARVNDQ^ SURREY, AND NORFOUCt 

BARON FTTZ-ALAN, CLUN & OSWALDESTKE, AND MALTRAVERS, 

EARL MARSHAL, AND HEREDrTARY MARSHAL OF ENGLAND » 



Cbe0e (tlolume0 



ARE, WITH HIS GRACE'S PERMISSION, 



MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED. 



• % 



PREFACE. 



OF all species of evidence, whether of the kin- 
dred or 5f the possessions of individuals, perhaJps the 
most satisfactory is afforded by their Wills: and in 
many^aises also these interesting documents exhibit 
traits of character which are more valuable, because 
more certain, than can possibly be deduced from the 
actions tof their lives. 

Suggestions of interest, prejudice, and not unfrc'- 
quently motives of revenge, may induce a witness 
either to mistate facts, or to give a colouring to 
them; which, although it may not violate truth, is 
nevertheless fiiF from being strictly in accordance with 
it; Biit the corporeal suffering under which a man 
often labours when he infs^es^ his last testabrient ; the 
solemn invocation with which it commences ; the £ts« 
sociations which it cannot fail to excite ; and^ above 
all, the recollection that the important document 
will not see the light'until be is removed from that 
sphere where alone falseh(>od can be successful, or 
vice be triumphant, tend to render the statements in 
wilk of unquestionable veracity. Who, it may be 
asked, would have the hardihood to stain with those 
evil passions which actuate mankind in this world. 



271594 



8 PREFACE. 

that deed which cannot take effect until he is before 
the Supreme Judge, and consequently immediately 
responsible for his conduct ? 

It has been sensibly remarked, that in documents of 
this nat\u*e, " the real wishes of the heart are suffered 
to appear, because we shall be indifferent to the con- 
sequences of them before they can be divulged •/' 
For all these reasons testaments of celebrated persons 
possess a claim on the attention of biographers which 
they have very rarely obtained. But it is to the an- 
tiquary, to him who seeks for information on the 
manners and habits of his ancestors, from sources 
unpolluted by the erroneous constructions or mis- 
representations of others, and who^ setting aside the 
theories of a favourite writer on past times, judges 
from evidence alone, that early wills are of the 
greatest importance. Where, but in such instru- 
ments, can we possibly obtain an accurate knowledge 
of the articles which constituted the furniture of the 
houses, or the wearing apparel of persons who lived 
several centuiries ago; or in what other record 
can so satisfactory an account of the property of an 
individual be discovered, as in that in which he 
.bequeaths it to his child, or his friend ? The 
great value of chattels, even down to the period with 
which this collection closes^ caused them to be de- 
scribed with a minuteness in wills, not only by per- 
sons of comparative insignificance, but even by the 
children of the royal family, which cannot fail to 



* Preface to the Will of Henry VII. by Thomas Astle, Esq. 
F. R. S. and F. S. A. 1776. 



1 *- ::1 V^u 



PREFACE. 9 

excite the smile of this *^ enlightened age." If the 
value of this sort of information be doubted) the same 
suspicion must apply to every thing which relates to 
former times. It is not, however, curiosity only 
which is gratified by these inquiries : for, by marking 
the alterations in manners and customs, and trac- 
ing the gradual, but certain progress of intellectual 
improvement — ^the former exhibited by the approach 
to existing institutions, and the latter by the removal 
of that superstitious bigotry, which is so fully dis- 
played in this work — we receive ample objects for 
.exercising philosophical reflection. We learn also 
from these comparisons to correct that general but 
absurd impression, that pur ancestors were wiser than 
ourselves; that former ages were purer in morals 
or motives; or that, in a political point of view, 
England ever knew the freedom which she now 
enjoys. 

^The kindness of a literary friend, whose va- 
luable remarks on many parts of these volumes 
will be found in subsequent pages, supersedes the 
necessity of doing more to. shew the many cu- 
rious points of history and manners illustrated by 
this collection than by slightly alluding to a few facts 
peculiarly corroborativeoftheprecedingobservations. 
Of individual character exhibited by wills an inte- 
resting instance is presented in that of Henry VII. ; 
for in that instrument he shews more clearly than is 
to be found elsewhere the real sentiments he enter- 
tained relative to the manner in which he obtained 
the crown, and of which he ordered a posthumous 
memorial to be erected *. In the dark character of 



10 PREFACE. 

Edward Duke of York, grandson of King Edward 
the Third, a character hitherto cdnsidered to bfe 
without one Redeeming trait, we find from his tes"- 
tameht, proof that at least he was not destitute of 
that best of human virtues, gratitude*. Indeed 
scarcely a will of any length is extant which does not 
afford some knowledge of the heart of the {iersoA 
by whom it was made. 

The moral state of this Country is shewn in many 
instances by the numerous bequests to natural chil- 
dren, who are described in the most unequivocal 
manner; and if it be argued that in that sense so^ 
ciety has not improved, still there is now a feeling 
of morality which prevents so bold and unblushing 
an avowal of the existence of them. It would be 
an endless task to specify the innumerable points of 
the deepest interest to the antiquary, in the descrip- 
tion of armour, dresses, beds, domestic utensils, cush 
toms, &c. which are contained in this Collection ; 
for these it is only necessary to refer him to the 
able article before alluded to, and to the index at 
th6 end of the volume. The philologist, also, will, in 
a few instances, derive information on the use of 
words which, it is presumed, are not to be found in 
any Glossary ; each of which is carefully noticed 
in the Index Rerum. The political state of society 
at different periods may likewise in many cases be 
accurately estimated from the wills of contemporary 
persons; for, independently of the influence 
which it is manifest the Clergy possessed over the 
minds of the testators, the extreme and uniform care 

' ' ■ — : 5 — ' r ' V. h ~^ 

*P.188- 



PBEFACE. il 

evincefd to select the sovereign, or other personages 
in the exercise of important oflfices; to superintend, or 
as if was Expressed, to act as supervisors of their tes^ 
tftmeotsy in order that the pbwer of the Crown might 
not be used to prevent the fulfilment of their be- 
quests, together with the solemn injunction to exec^U^ 
tors and supervisors, faithfully ' to do their duty, 
prove that the execution of Wills was frequently 
impeded by the avarice of individuals, or by the 
ui^wful exercise of the Royal influence. Nor 
is this all ; for if the fact needed further corro^ 
boration, we find frequent bequests, or, more pro- 
perly speakings bribes given to the King to allow the 
testator's will to be performed. To pray the mo* 
narch, or some powerful subject, to be a " good mas- 
ter** to children, or to be kind and faithful in seeing 
a dying friend's posthumous bequests executed, and 
to give him money or a piece of plate to induce him 
to do so^ was of frequent occurrence. This arose 
in a great degree from the wardship of minors, sons 
of tenants of the Crown, being in the King, and was 
a perpetual source of tyrannical exactions, until the 
Court of Wards, which though created by Henry the 
Eighth to remedy these abuses, nevertheless did not 
restrain them, was abolished at the restoration of 
Charles the Second, together with the oppressive 
tenures on which it was founded. Let the ad- 
vocates for ^ the good old times*' for a moment re- 
flect on the frightful state of society when part of a 
8ubject*sgoodswere obliged to be given to the Crown, 
or to some royal favourite, to preserve to his family 
the secure possession of the remainder ! 



f(^^^'/(^i^. •-/ /^^^-^ 









< «• v«. I 






r . •> , . • - . ' 



.• ^ 



^1< 



Ij }/ <^ ' .'''-'- *^' '• '- 



c. ."^ » • • ' 



12 PREFACE. 

In the selection of the contents of the following 
sheets, there has been another object which» though 
of inferior general interest, will, it is hoped, be 
frequently found useful. The pedigrees of noble 
and other families of consequence, before the 
€!ommencement of the Heralds' Visitations, are 
often confused and . imperfect ; and, with the ex- 
ception of family evidences, which are rarely pre- 
served, and, if preserved, are not always accessible, 
and Inquisitiones post Mortem, which merely shew 
who were the heirs of particular persons, wills are aU 
most the only sources of authentic information on the 
subject. Much information touching various families 
is also frequently contained in the wills of persons not 
connected with them, and which would not therefore 
be consulted ; hence a miscellaneous collection, well 
indexed, cannot fail to throw considerable light on de- 
scents now contradictory or uncertain ; and whether 
the facts developed ou these points confirm what was ' 
doubtful, or establish what was unknown, the value 
of them to those interested in genealogical researches 
is unquestionable. The; names of all manors and 
advowsons are likewise retained and referred to in a 
separate index, by which the descent of real pro- 
perty may often be traced. 

It was in the original plan of this work to have se- 
lected only the wills of people of eminence ; but 
the numerous curious points illustrated by the testa- 
ments of persons in humbler stations of life, required 
the admission of some of them, with the view of 
forming as complete a collection as was possible. 
From the same motive, though the work only pro- 



PREFACE. 13 

fesses to contain abstracts of wills, a few are printed 
entire. 

Some observations are necessary on the sources 
whence the wills here printed have been taken. 
Nothing would have been so satisfactory as to have 
copied them from the originals ; but the heavy expence 
and other obstacles attendant on such a proceeding, 
rendered it absolutely impracticable ; whilst the total 
absence of every thing like urbanity, even if. a 
stronger expression be not merited, in the deport* 
ment of those with whom the public come in col- 
lision at the principal Registry in the kingdom— that 
at Doctors' Commons*— deterred the Editor from so- 
liciting permission to transcribe or collate the wills 
here abstracted with such of the originals, or re- 
corded copies as exist there. 

The person who, when perusing a will in that 
Repository, has once experienced the rude manner 
of address to which the apphcants are subject, 
and the still more insolent tone in which it is some- 
times uttered, must be endowed with an unusual 
forbearance if he subjects himself to such conduct 
when he can possibly avoid it. Whether an amend- 
ment will ever take place can only be conjectured ; 
but it is scarcely possible to conceive a public office, 
which, so far as the convenience of the public in 
the respect in question is concerned, more impe- 
riously demands it, especially when the large emo- 
luments of the Registers are considered. 

The difficulty of access to original information on . 
the subject of Wills compelled the formation of this 
Collection from various sources. As it was an object . 



14 PREFACE. 

to present as much testamentary evidence as could 
be obtained, abstracts of several Wills are printed 
from Dugdale's Baronage, Collins* Peerage, County 
Histories, Memoirs of Fs^mlies, smd other works; 
but the chief sources have be to Manuscripts in the 
British Museum, and in private Collections. It was, 
Qot always, that there was any choice in the se- 
lections, for the MS. notices alluded to, were made 
in most cases by former Cpllectors for genealogical 
purposes, though they bad generally the good 
taste to preserve eveiy curious bequest or recital de* 
scriptive of the manners of the times. The critical 
antiquary may possibly find several words erroneously 
printed, and expressions used which are incorrect, 
but which the Editor was unwilling to alter, lest 
the correction should be imcalled for, from the 
consideration, that, however faulty, it might be the 
literal expression of the original. This remark is made 
in anticipation of the criticism of others, for not 
having more frequently exercised his own. The 
notes to the different Wills are chiefly biographical, 
or rather genealogical ; though in sotoe places they 
present a sketch of the testator's character, and in 
others point out an historical fact which the will 
in the text illustrates. 

This work is the firstattempt, with the exception of 
the highly valuable Collection of Royal Wills edited 
by John Nichols, Esq. the venerable and eminent 
Historian of Leicestershire, to illustrate the manners 
and customs of past ages by the unerring evidence 
of the testaments of contemporary persons. The 
contents of that volume are carefully abstracted in 



PREFACE* 15 

thifi, though as that publicatioB gives. the Wills ait 
lengthy the extracts have not been so cdpious as may 
perhaps be expected. A few curious Wills have at 
difierent times^ and in various works been pirinted, 
but nothing less than m .^tensive and miscellaneous 
collection can be really useful for illustration ; as the 
peculiarity which caused a solitary one to be noticed 
might frequently have arisen from individual eccen** 
tricity rather jth^n ftoin the general habiis of the 
period ; and we might be attributing to the effect of 
national manners what in fact was only the result of 
personal caprice, A general collection, however , re« 
lating to people in various ranks, of society affords a 
criterion which cannot mislead ; and if several 
thousand wills were printed literally from the ori- 
ginals, with glossarial notes and copious indexes, 
from the earliest period to the end of the seven- 
teenth century, on the plan of' this work, the most 
valuable illustration of the dresses, manners, lan- 
guage, and, in a word, of every thing connected with 
the domestic history of this Country, would be 
formed, which could possibly be produced. 

Little more remains to be said than to fulfil 
the gratifying duty of expressing thanks to those 
from whom assistance has been derived. The gentle- 
man who contributed the valuable introductory matter 
in explanation of many passages in the different wills, 
merits his especial thanks, and he much regrets that 
he has commanded that his name should be withheld. 
Motives which he fully appreciates, unfortunately 
prevent his publicly acknbwledging other obligations 
where they are most eminently due. He flatters 



16 PREFACE. 

himself, however; that thotigh unexpressed, the 
friends alluded to will feel assured that they are 
deeply felt. 

To Sir Richard Colt Hoare, whose literary reputa- 
tion does not exceed the kindness with which he 
places the result of his researches at the dispo- 
sition of others, he is indebted for the interesting 
plate of the Seal attached to Lady Hungerford's 
Will, and for other acceptable contributions. Of 
his obligations to the able Historian of Northamp- 
tonshire^ almost every page bears testimony ; and 
of these, and many other proofs of his good opinion, 
he is highly sensible. 

December 1S25. 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 



JL HERE is no part of antiquarian pursuit and in- 
quiry which is more satisfactory, as excluding con- 
jecture in a greater degree, than that which is di- 
rected towards fixing the identity of persons, with 
their several relations and individual circumstances, 
or to ascertain the customs, habits, and domestic 
furniture, which prevailed in any distinct sera. No 
document can produce more satisfactory evidence of 
each of these subjects, severally, than the last Will 
and testament of noble or opulent men and women. 
In these, we have a certain proof of the existence, 
the individual connection, and the line in which 
families have descended ; and with a power of verifi- 
cation more valid, perhaps, than that given by title 
deeds and sepulchral inscriptions. 

In the selection now offered from the Wills of the 
principal personages who have lived during the 
lapse of five centuries, it will be obvious to all anti- 
quarian readers, that genealogy has been a chief 
object; and that some additional light will be 
thrown by it, upon many an obscure pedigree, in 
which the dates of births and deaths, the second 

a 






11 PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 

marriages, and the younger issue, have not been 
ascertained, even in the elaborate and correct com- 
pilations of Glover, Vincent, and Dugdale. In points 
where they add corroboration, they give no inferior 
satisfaction. They likewise confirm the dates of de- 
cease, and appropriate sepulchral monuments and 
tombs which are without inscriptions, to those indivi- 
duals to perpetuate whose memory they were certainly 
erected. But, with other objects in view, an elucidation 
is attempted which will familiarize us with the habits 
of our ancestors, shew the existing state of the Arts, 
the form and value of domestic furniture, and iiten- 
sils of gold and silver, as applied to the service of 
the altar or high table ; and of armour, for the field 
of battle or the peaceful joustings. Such investiga- 
tions may gratify a rational curiosity, and serve to 
fix in the mind a positive idea of things, customs, 
and religious feeling, which is not to be separated 
from their own sera. A want of suflScient discrimi- 
nation of these points has led to a certain confusion 
in the minds of many, who with great zeal have 
entered upon the study of the antiquities of our own 
country. The very obscure terms used for armour, 
utensils, and furniture, have presented obstacles 
rarely surmounted by those who have not the pon- 
derous tomes of Du Cange, Charpentiere, Lacombe, 
and Spelman, at their command ; or, if they have, 
are not industrious enough to make use of them. 
As far as any such terms occur, in the present selec- 
tion, a true and critical explanation of them, is 
attempted, as it may be supported by the authority 
of those able etymologists. The very accurate and 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. Ill 

picturesque descriptions given by Chaucer of the 
habiliments, jewels, and furniture^ peculiar to bis 
own age, will be sometimes quoted, as they reflect a 
pleasing light of comfirmation upon the application 
and use of any instance in particular. 

Thomas Warton, whose taste and sagacity were 
most conspicuous in his investigation of the habits and 
customs of the Middle Ages, since the Conquest, 
has observed, that, after the battle of Cressy by our 
victorious Monarch, Edward III. and towards the 
end of the fourteenth century, " riches and plenty, 
the effects of conquest, peace, and prosperity, were 
spread on every side, and new luxuries were im- 
ported in great abundance from the conquered 
countries. There were few families, even of a mo- 
derate condition, but had in their possession pre 
cious articles of dress and furniture,^ such as silks, 
fur, tapestry, embroidered beds, cups of gold and 
silver, porcelain ^ud chrystal, bracelets, chains, and 
necklaces, brought from Caen, Calais, and other 
foreign cities/' (Hist. Engl. Poetry, vol. ii. p. 254.) 
Walsingham, Ypodigin. 121. Hist. 1.59.) The per- 
fection of workmanship, and the variety of design, 
which were exhibited In the setting of jewels, the 
gilding and embossing of plate-vessels, and which, 
from the demand for such sumptuous luxuries, had 
greatly increased both in number and beauty, has 
seldom been considered with sufficient attention. 
We are apt to envelope these Middle Ages, with 
respect to the habits of pjivat^ life, iti a cloud of 
barbarism, and to attribute the revival of the more 
elegant arts to an aera much later than the true one 

a2 



IV PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 

Jewels were chiefly applied to increase the splen* 
dour of the pix, or corporas, which contained the 
holy wafer ; and were inlaid on golden chalices, as 
the personal ornament of ladies of high rank, in 
coronets, circles, nouches, necklaces, and broches, 
all of which were singly bequeathed. The variety 
of precious materials is mentioned by Chaucer : 

'* But he were knowinge, for the nones> 
That could devise all the stones, 
For no man could preise or gesse 
Of hem the value or richesse, 
Rubies ther were, saffires, ragounces, \Jadntks] 
And amerandes, more than two ounces.*' 

ROMANT OF THB RoSE. 

Plate for the service of the altar consisted of many 
pieces. The art of chasing and embossing solid 
gold, with astonishing delicacy, of parcel gilding, 
gold upon silver, of enamelling (very anciently) y and 
of casting whole figures, or in high relief, had at- 
tained to a positive degree of perfection in the four- 
teenth century. At the high tables of the nobility, 
standing-cups and covers, bowls, and dishes of all 
sizes, and certain of them exceedingly massive, were 
in daily use, and always given as legacies. Favourite 
drinking-cups were distinguished by names, " Benai- 
son," '* Belchier," and entailed upon the heir. 

Church furniture consisted of velvet and silk 
stufis for the embellishment of the altar, and the 
personal habits of the officiating priests. These lat- 
ter were usually composed of cloth of gold, woven 
with different colours, and the finest linen cloth. 
Books were first written, and splendidly illuminated, 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. V 

for the service of the altar only. Popular romances, 
as richly ornamented, found no less favourable ac- 
ceptance with knights and ladies, than the decretals 
and homilies with the religious orders. Relicks 
or fragments of such of the English Prelates as had 
obtained canonization, were preserved with equal 
veneration with those of the more early Saints. 
They were generally set in gold, and kept in caskets 
of jasper, carnation, agate, and chrystal. Of such 
extreme cost were the state-beds of that time, that 
they occur constantly in Royal and Noble Wills. 
It was customary to embroider the coat-armour of 
the owner upon velvet or sattin, and to entail them 
upon the heir. The ladies of quality had then a 
numerous suit of young female attendants, whose 
skill in embroidery was a necessary and admired 
accomplishment, and the ornamenting bed-hangings 
was a frequent employment of their skill in needle- 
work. 

Suits of tapestry^ adapted to the several apart- 
ments in baronial residences, and removeable from 
one to the other, were extremely costly, and often 
bequeathed or made heirlooms. Warton gives a 
very interesting detail of the subjects of old romance, 
which were known to have been wrought upon these 
tapestry-hangings, and enumerates the palaces in 
which they were preserved. (Vol.i.pp.209 — ^213, 8vo.) 

Of personal armour, our ancestors had the greatest 
scrupulosity and care that each of its component parts 
should be of equal strength and pliability. The 
equipment for the tournament admitted of a still 
greater degree of sumptuous embellishment. So 



Vi PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. ' " "^ 

large an expense, as that at first incurred, rendered 
them a personal property of sufficient consequence 
to find a place in Wills. 

The care of their sepulture, and the erection of 
tombs, by which not only their memory should be 
preserved, but some idea given of their persons, 
by effigies and portraitures, seem to have occupied 
the minds of most testators. It is needless to 
say how magnificent and beautiful many of these 
sepulchral monuments were, as ocular demonstra- 
tion is afibrded us, much more frequently than 
in any other instance, of their former excessive 
richness, as much, at least, as has escaped de- 
cay by time itself, or from being violently mu- 
tilated and defaced by the fanatic Reformers. In 
the orders left for funeral obsequies, it is interesting 
to observe the extremes of ostentation and humility 
in many of the Wills, from which extracts are given, 
and the desire of procuring the greatest number of 
masses in the shortest time, and for the least money. 
We have a greater satisfaction in observing that one 
of the Heroes of Agincourt remembered the poor 
soldiers who shared and survived that memorable 
victory, by a bequest to satisfy their wages in arrear ; 
an act of honourable justice, especially as he ac- 
knowledges that '* peradventure he had received 
more wages from the King and Realm than he was 
worthy of.'* And in the bequests to poor maidens, 
to procure their marriage; and *^ to mend foul ways }*' 
we contemplate an useful benevolence. 

The strict injunction of futui:e celibacy given by 
husbands to their widows, for the sake of children 



PRfiUMINARY OBSERVATIONS. Vll 

by the first marn^e, either by request, or penalty of 
jointure ; and the bequeathing the marriage of their 
daughters to a certaiti individual, under forfeiture, 
was consonant with the spirit of feudal times. 

The enthusiastic preaching of the Croisades, in 
the twelfth and thirteenth centuries^ induced many 
of the nobility to make a vow of personal service in 
expeditions to the Holy Land. Richard Wiche, 
Bishop of Chichester, bequeathed l marcs (in 1053) 
to his brother, Robert Chaundos, ^*ixx subsidium 
Terrse Sanctas,** to go himself, or to send another. 
Maurice Baron Berkeley had made a vow that he 
would go with the Croisade, in which he failed, and 
died in 1281. Maurice, his son, gave his Esquire, 
John Urle, ^g.lOO "to absolve his father's vow.'* 
As the votary himself appears, in many instances, to 
have evaded the obligation, and made reparation in 
his last Will, by leaving a large sum of money to 
induce another man to undertake the service, may 
we not infer, from such circumstances, that these 
expeditions we.re not always voluntary ? 

The Will of Dame Alice Wyche (the widow of 
a Lord Mayor of London) is replete with good 
sense and useful charity. We must recollect that it 
was made in 14749 and we shall perceive its extent. 
^.1200 to poor diligent labourers in poor villages ; 
to 100 poor householders, a cow, and 13^. ^d. each, 
with three ewes ; for the marriage of poor maidens 
of good conversation ^.100. Dpes modern philan- 
thropy, with its high pretensions, go beyond this 
bequest ? 

It is worthy observation, how great a dispropor- 



Vlii PRELIMINARY OBSERVATlQNlS. 

tion existed between the fortunes of elder sons^ or 
heirs female^ and the younger branches of noble 
families. Thomas Marquis of Dorset gives his daugh- 
ters ^.1,000 each for their marriage portion (in 
1505); and| a few years after, Thomas Duke of 
Norfolk ^.300 only. 

It is ascertained by Wills that the ladies of quality 
who borrowed money of each other, left with their 
creditor a jewel or gold ornament of equal value. 

We are now entering into the sixteenth century. 
There is a greater monotony, and want of individual 
feeling and character, in the Wills which bear date 
subsequently to this period. Funeral observances 
and sepulchral monuments were not less strict or 
expensive, but the ** morrow masses,*' and "months 
minds,*' had sensibly diminished. Legal prolixity was 
now thought necessary for the different provisions 
and contingencies of the several Wills. Plate was 
scantily bequeathed, excepting to executors, having 
been in noble families settled as an heirloom. Beds^ 
and their furniture, became less frequently a subject 
of testamentary bequest, excepting to ** married 
daughters." 

After the period with which this collection closes, 
when the reformed religion was firmly established in 
England, we find in the preambles of most of the 
Wills of the Nobility, more especially of those who 
had been entrusted with the Government of the 
Country, an explicit declaration of their faith, and 
acknowledgment of the Protestant Church, given 
much at length. And this strain of piety, as dictated 
bv the solemn occasion, was continued for at least 
two centuries more. 



EXTRACTS 



REFERRING TO EXPLANATORY NOTES. 



P«ge. 

12 A gilt chalice, enamelled with the arms of Warren. 1376. 

A large bed of red camora. 

A new bed of red velvet. 

14 A bed of red velvet, embroidered with ostrich-feathers of silver, 

and heads of leopards of gold. 

50 Chesible and cope of red silk, tunicle and dalmatick of yellow 

cendal. 

An alba, amice, and stole, favon and towel. 

52 Gold ring with a ruby in it. 

54 A crystal cup. 

Best coat of mail, helmet, and harness. 1315. 

56 Two hundred pound of wax to bum round my corpse. 

57 One hundred marks to find five armed men for the Holy Land. 

66 A nouche of gold surrounded with large pearls, with a ruby 'ft Ci<c 
between four pearls, three diamonds, and a pair of gold pater- "T^T ^^^ 
nosters of fifty pieces, together with a cross of gold, in which ^^^t ^ ^ 
is the true cross of our Lord. 

67 A large sapphire stone, of a fine blue colour. 1361. 

72 One entire suit of vestments, of velvet chequered. 

A suit of vestments of green cloth of gold. 
A whole suit of red cloth of gold. 1367. 

73 To my heir a ruby ring, which ring is called the Charter of 
Pojmings. 

All my armour which my father left me. 

74 Five square tapers and four morters, besides torches, shall 
bum about my corpse at my funeral. 

The sword which the King gave me in the name of the 
Earldom. 
My summer vestment powdered with leopards. 1368. 






/ 



X EXTRACTS REFERRING 

P«ge- 

76 A cup of silver standing on three lions^ with a cover ; also, 
two pattels and a salt-cellar of silver. 

A tablet of silver gilt and enamelled, with three leaves, set 
with figures, one of the Ascension of Our Lady in a tabernacle. 

77 Mj whole suit of armour for the jousts. 
79 An ouche called the Eagle. 1369. 

81 Seven thousand masses to be said for 39^. 3«. 4</. 

A frontore, with the arms of Berkeley and Cobham, standing 
on white and purple. 
A ring with a diamond. 1369. 
83 Immediately afler my decease, my corpse shall be carried to 
burial, covered only with a linen cloth having a red cross there- 
on, with two tapers, one at the head, and the other at tlie feet, 
and I charge my son that he do nothing contrary thereto. 

86 Vesseiux estutes ph. 1371. 

87 A cross made of the very wood of Christ's cross. 1371. 

For making the said tomb and funeral expenses cxtL and to 
the poor on that day 300/. 

98 A dozer, with four cousters of the same suit, green, powdered 
with dolphins, a dragenall, six pottengers, &c. 1374. 

93 A tomb, with an image of an armed knight thereon in alabas- 
ter, lOO/. and the remainder for masses. 
Two cups of gold. 

96 My best coronet ; and I charge him on my blessing to keep it 
during his life, and then to Leave it to his heir. My second 
coronet. My third coronet. 1375. 

96 That my helmet be placed at the head of my corpse, with my 
shield of arms and my sword. 1375. 

100 My black courser. 

104 My best black horse to the Friars. 
My palfrey to the Rector. 

105 Dorser, costers, banker. 

108 On condition that they bear my arms. 

111 A bone of St. Richard of Chichester, and a finger of Thomas 
de Cantelowe, Bishop of Hereford, and the reliques of St Tho- 
mas of Canterbury. 

A cup of gold with a cover, called Benesonne ; our sword gar- 
nished with gold, which belonged to good King Edward ; best 
gold horn, with a belt ; a salt-cellar in the shape of a dog. 

A coronet of gold with stones, and 900 pearls, to his daughter.v 

112 A ruby engraved with a signet. 

115 That a picture of a horse and man armed with my arms be 



TO EXPLANATORY NOTES. XI 

P«ge. 

made of silver, and offered at the altar of Our Lady of Walsing- 
ham, and another at Bromeholme. 

118 I desire that no horse or arms be offered at my funeral; 
six large tapers; five mortars; 100 men clothed in white, with 
a cross behind and before, each to carry a torch. 1385. 

119 My coat of mail d*aciere of Naples; my helmet made at 
Bourdeaux, with a camail d'aciere ; also, my sword paade at 
Turenne ; a large gold ring, with a great diamond set therein ; 
a golden fermail, with a heart. 

124 Five tapers, each 20 lb. ; four mortars, each 10 lb. 

126 I will that the person who shall first bear my surname and 
arms, according to my will, shall have the use of my great 
velvet bed for life, but not to be alienated firom him, &c. ; with 
plate on the same condition. 1389. 

127 To William Archbishop of Canterbury a gilt chalice, and a 
missal ; to my daughter Engaine two primers, and a book called 
Arthur de Bretagne. 

ISO To my wife Philippa her own cup, called Bealchier ; two 
salt-cellars which she gave me as a new year's gift at Chastel 
Philipe. 

131 Silver basins, in which I was accustomed to wash before 
dinner and supper ; the hangings of the large hall, with the 
arras of Arundel and Warren ; beds of blue and red silk, em- 
broidered with the same arms, borne quarterly. 

132 My cup enamelled with a stag at the top. 

133 A coronet, Bible in two volumes, and a pair of decretals, &c. 
1392. 

134 Four dozen of silver dishes, and six chargers of silver, en- 
tailed upon his son and daughter. 1385. 

135 My best horse for a mortuary ; my heart of pearls ; a tablet 
of jasper which the King of Armonie gave me; a tablet of gold 
with images; my sauter, with the arms of Northampton. 
1392. 

136 Abed of Norwich stuff embroidered with butterflies. 1394. 

137 A bed of tapiter*s work ; all my books in Latin, English, and 
French. 

4400 masses to be said in most haste that may be, within 
fourteen nights after my decease. 
141 All beds made for my body, called in England ^' trussing- 
beds ;'* a chain of gold, in the old manner, with the name of 
God in each part. The piece of arras which the Duke of Bur- 
goyne gave me when I was at Calais. 1397* 



(H 



XU EXTRACTS REFERRING 

145 A tomb for my father and mother, and another for myself 
and son, 500 marks. 1397. 

146 A coat of mail of Milan ; 20 shillings for making an image of 
St. Anne in alabaster ; 10^. for a marble stone to be laid on my 
grave, with the image of myself and mj wives fixed thereon. 
1398. 

147 A pair of paternosters of coral ; a tonell of good wine to the 
Prior and Convent of Lanthoiiy, near Gloucester. 

148 A Chronicle of France, in French, with the arms of the Duke 
of Bourgoyne ; Giles de regimine principum, a book of vices 
and virtues, and another poem of the Historic de Chivaler a 
eigne ; a psalter richly illuminated, with the clasps enamelled 

jry . with white swans, to remain to my heirs ; a book illuminated 
r. fyiUK^s. with the " Legenda aurea/' in French ; ^French Bible^ in two 
7 volumes; a book of decretals, in French; also, a book of 

''Meistre Histoires," a book <<de vitis patrum,*' and the 
<' Pastoral Care of St. Gregory ;*' a psalter glosez. 1399. 

153 Three hundred pounds weight of wax, in six tapers and seven 
mortars. 1400. 

154 My friends attending my funeral shall have good entertain- 
ment, viz. a supper over night and a dinner on the next day. 

A cross with the pedestal silver and gilt, and enamelled with 
the story of our Savour's passion ; and a precious stone called a 
beryl, bound with silver and enamelled, to put the host into i 
a cup of the swan, and the knives and salt-sellars for the coro- 
nation of a king. 

160 A portfore and missal according to the use of York, which 
belonged to my father, to remain to the heirs male of my fa- 
mily. 

161 Twenty marks for 3,000 masses. 
One bed covered with ermine ; 100 shillings to make a window 

of glass, with my arms, in the said window. 

163 My sword, basilard, and dagger. 

163 Whereas I have been a soldier, and have taken wages of the 
King and the Realm, as well by land as by water, and per- 
ad venture received more than was my desert, I will that my 
executors pay six score marks unto the most needful men unto 
whom King Richard was debtor. Also, having been a soldier 
with the Earl of Arundel, and peradventure received more than 
I was worthy of, I beg that 10/. be paid to the executors of the 
said Earl, to be given to the poorest man. to whom the said 
Earl was indebted, 1404. 



i <ti* 



TO EXPLANATORY NOTES. XIU 

164 I9 Lewis Clifford, false and traitor to my Lord God, and to 
all the blessed company of Heaven, and unworthy to be called / 
a Christian man. I charge my executors, as my whole trust is \ 

in them, that on my stinking carrion be neither laid cloth of / ' ^ ^ 
gold nor silk, but black cloth, a taper at my head, and another/ 
at my feet ; no stone, nor other thing, whereby any man mayV ■ 
know where my stinking carrion lieth. ,, ) 

165 My missal and porhoos, and my book of tribulation. 1404. 

166 One thousand masses 4/. Sj. Ad. 1405. 

168 A long sword which was King Edward's, given by him to my 
father. To my daughter, for her marriage, 300 marks. 

To the building of the Church of Bletsho 13<. 4d. 

169 To the fabrick of the steeple of Wirksop 40^. 

171 One hundred pounds for the expenses of my funeral ; 10,000 
masses to be said for my soul in all possible haste after my 
death, by the most honest priests that can be found. 

172 My best sword and harness for jousts of peace, which be- 
longed to war. 1408. 

175 Five pounds each to seven priests, to sing 1,000 masses in 

one year. 

Two chargers and twelve dishes of silver ; the same, with six 

saucers of silver. 1409. 
180 ^' Filiae mese spiritual!/* 
184 For an altar-tomb 100 marks. 

186 That all the soldiers who were with me at Harfleur have 
their arrears. 1415. 

187 My hopolandes, huyks not furred^ be divided among the ser- 
vants of my chamber; my saddles and harness amongst my 
henchmen. 

188 The habergeon. 

189 Brigaudiers covered with red velvet, checquered red and 
white ; my helmet which I wear ; breast-plate, and the pance 
which belonged to my father ; my housell, and my iron morion. 
1415. 

190 Great cup of jet ; ^0 coats of mail ; 20 breast-plates ; 20 
helmets ; 20 lances. 1415. 

191 No more than 40/. be laid out in meat^ drink, and tapers, on 
the day of my burial. 

1,000/. to be given by my executors to the poor and needy, 
and to buy books and vestments for such parish churches of 
patronage as may want them, and for the succour of my 
tenants in my lordships. 



\ 



XIV EXTRACTS RKFERBING 

192 Fi^ gobieU newly made ; a drinldiig-ciip of gold made in 
the fotrm of a rose* 

196 A man to go for tlie good of my soal to Rome, to the Holy 
Land, to the Sepnlchre of Our Lord, << et ad amgumem sanc- 
tum," in Germiany* 

^Ofi If the Lord the King be good to my executors, that he be 
forgiven half the gold that he oweth me upon pawns for my 
wages. 
My cup of silver, called << Constable Bolle." 1480. 

90S One thousand crowns, upon condition that they find a fitting 
priest to celebrate mass daily, to the end of the world* 1493. 

209 A book called << Tristram" to Joan Countess of Westmoreland. 

210 One hundred pounds sterling for a tomb. 

A complete suit of armour and two horses for mortuary. 

817> Which tomb I desire to be made of marble, with portraitures 
of each on brass, and epitaphs. 

91S A curious hearse of wax, of a small size, to be placed upon 
the aforesaid hearse. 

296 My simple and wretched body to be buried in the choir ; 
and to be carried there with all worship that ought to be done 
unto a woman of mine estate, and there be done for my soul 
^000 masses, in all haste, that they may be goodly. The said 
firiars te4(avje a whole suit of blacky i. e. a chesyple, two tuni- 
cles, three copes» with my best pair of candlesticks of silver 
wrethen, and my best suit of vestments of cloth of gold with 
peacocks, with altar-cloths and albs, and all that longeth there- 
to ; to the marriage of poor maidentr dwelling within my lord- 
ships lOOl. ; to the making of and amending fie^le bridges and 
foul ways 100^. ; and to the finding and deliverance of poor 
prisouers that have been well conditioned 40^. ; a bed of gokl, 
swans, with tapiter of green t^^try, two • pair of sheets of 
Rffjrnes, a pair of fustians, six pair of other sheets, six pair of 
blankets, six pillows, with cushions uad banncoves, that longen 
to the bed aforesaid ; " a pane of mynevre ;" a bed of cloth of 
gold with lybbards, with those tapettes and cushions of my best 
red worsted. 
998 Three of my best horses in my chare ; my best gown furred 
with marters ; a bowl of silver called '^ Playce-bowl ;** my best 
cup of gold covered, and my round bason of silver pounced 
with morys letters. 
1^31 An image of Our Lady of pure gold, there to remain for ever 
as^aheriot ; four images of gold, each weighmg 90 lb. to be made 



TO EXPLANATORY NOTES. XV 

Pkge. 

like unto myself^ in my coat-of-arnuiy holding as anchor in my 

handsj to be offered at four several altars, 1434. 
932 The ciip of gold with the dance of men and w:om(en» 
835 A piece of plate called'<<Chalice-pece;*' a mads-book called 

"Graduale." 
337 Do make my testament in Englishe tonge, for my most pro- 

fitf reding, and understanding, in thise wide, &c. 1439. 

239 My great << templys/* with u baleys ;" my stattte to be made, 
all nakyd, with my haire cast backward, acicording to the design 
and model which Thomas Porchalion has for that purpose. 

240 To our Lady a crown of gold made of my chain, weighing 
25 lb. with precious stoh^ to be set in that crown. 

d41 A cup of gold made at Toumelles, in Paris, by Stephen 

Allbvus, his goldsmith. 
245 A pair of flaggons of silver gilt, 

250 Ten thousand masses to be said as soon as possible after my 
decease. 

251 To the King (Henry VI.) a tablet with reliques, which is 
called the ** Tablet of Bourbon,'* and a cup of gold with an 
ewer, which belonged to his father, and out of which he usually 
drunk. 

252 Cups of gold, worth 40^. each. 

253 *' Lectum blodium de panno aureo, de Damasco." 1446. 

255 A cup of beryl garnished with pearls and precious stones, to 
put the Holy Satrament in. 

256 My white bed with poppinjays. 

258 My best Legend of the Lives of the Saints, in French. 

And because the Lord Viscount Beaumont is lineally de- 
scended from the Dukes of Lancaster, 1 bequeath to him a cup 
of silver with a cover bordered with gold, with which cup he 
was often served, and out of which he did use to drink, so long 
as he livedo 1449. 

271 One great brooch of gold, of two angels, fashioned like a 
man's heart. 

277 A golden collar for her neck, with precious stones hanging 
thereat. 

284 A chesible, price 26«. Sd* 

285 Two hundred marks to the said Isabel, if she marry Robert 
Vele, and if to any other man one hundred marks. 

304 And, wife, that ye remember your promise to me, that you 

take the order of widowhood. 1469. 
322 I will that a chaplain celebrdte for me in the said church for 



XVI BXTRACTS REFERRING 

three years.— P. 468. For seven years.— P. 476. Hie same.— Ten 
marks yearly, for dirige every day. 
324 For buying IS marks livelyhode by the year, 160^. 
395 My potts with, castles. 
S26 To any of those (of my parishioners) who will pilgrimage 

for me to St. Thomas of Canterbury. 
399 Houseling towel of diaper. 
367 Gloset saulter. . 
380 Our Ladye of Pue. 
384 Observance house at Greenwich. 
435 A demysent of gold. 

449 IfOOOl. to every of ray unmarried daughters. 
445 Unam Catheriam. 
459 My tabulet of gold which she now hath in her hands as a 

pledge ; two quishions of coudtrefeit arras. 
466 Two escocheons set up, that our souls may rather be remem- 
bered and prayed for. 
That my executors provide 300 shirts and smocks for poor 

folk, one half for the men and the other for the women. 
468 I will that my son have 90^. a year for his exhibition and 

finding, until he come of age. 
471 To my Lord of Oxford a cross of gold with diamonds. 
473 To the lights and other ornaments of the Church such money 

as shall arise from the sale of 100 sheep. 
486 My long gown of the colour of black murrey, and my best 

bonnet ; my coat of the colour of violeti bound with velvet ; 

my velvet tippet ; my furred coat. 

495 Which stone, with the portraiture and writings, to be to the 
order and value of 90f . or thereabouts. 

496 One thousand six hundred and ninety ounces of plate. 
506 A ring of gold set with a turques, a diamond, and a rubye. 
591 And in the dale of our enterment, there to be distributed in 

almes amongst pbore people 133/. 6s.hd, , 

533 My body to be buried where God will. 

And whereas that I have two bastards, I give the King's Grace 

the choyce of them. 
536 Thirteen silver spoons with the figures of J*hu and his twelve 

Apostles. 
538 I will that my written books in parchment, and my books of 

Hugo de Vienna, be delivered to the Monastery of Ensham. 
541 Menkes of Geronden my manor of Bambam for the term 

of fifty years. 



TO EXPLANATORY NOTES. XVIl 

54S I will tBat'my daugfathers Katherine and Anne have 800^4 

' between theniy or (tit a certain ca^e) that the said sum be be- 

stowen in copes and vestments to the House of Clarvaux. 
54^ My great chain of gold, which is worth 140/. that the King's 
. Grace gave me. 
554 My Bible^ and all my other books, as well of law as of en- 

triesy English books and Latin books, remain to the heirs male 

of my body, without selling or putting away any of them. 
566 Part of St. PauFs, commonly called Pardon Churchyard. 
610 That the said five poor men shall be such as shall say at least 

their paternoster, ave, and creed, in Latin. 
6G6 I remit and forgive all such poor as be in my debt, and not 

able to content the same, whose names appeareth in the seventh 

book of debts, under whose nvmes 1 have written, << Amore Dei 

remitto.** 
671 Forasmuch as Henry Keble, whose daughter I have married 

lieth in Aldermanbury Church, London, and no stone over him^ 

I will that a stone be provided, 
680 My executors cause to be given to a thousand priests six 

pence a piece, to say Dirige and Placebo. 
719 I will that a cup of gold be made out of my Collar of the 

Garter, and given to the King. 
79Q I will, that for the space of two years, after my death, a godly 

and discreet man be chosen to edify the youth of the parish of 

Westbury, with two lectures, &c. 1544. 
7^5 A stone of marble graved with my picture, my three wives, 

and my three sons and four daughters, to the value of four 

pounds, to be laid on my sepulture, 1548. 
7^7 And at the head and feet a scripture of brsCss, to shew the 

time of my decease, what stock I was of, and to what men of 

worship I was married. 

733 To Sir T. Chayney my great gilt cupp that the King of Pole 
dyd gjTve me. 

734 To Chester tlie Harold, my sersenet cloke embroidered. 
To Guyens the Pursuivant, my best cap and the broche. 

743 My great ring with signwynakye in it, which my father gave 

me. My ring with the best pointed diamond. 
749 Nicholas Milles my natural son ; Henry Oxenden my son-in« 

law. 
760 To my daughter Anne Pelham, towards her finding and 

bringing, until such time as she shall be married, 10 /. yearly ; 

and 500 marks, and all her apparel, on the day of her marriage. 

b 



Xviii EXTRACTS R£FE&RlNGy &C. 

76 L I) Richard, by dmne pennusiony Bishop of Chich^stery Sicl 
to John Radley my marshal, and to John the keeper of my pal- 
freys. 

766 My executors shall cause to be rebuilt the body or middle of 
the said Church, to the amount of mmd marks, if so much be 
necessary to be expended. 




c 



/ 



NOTES IN EXPLANATION, 



ACCORDING TO REFERENCE. 



P. 10. la the reign of Henry III. and with Diore fre- 
quency in that of his son and successori enamelled cups 
and rings were hrought into England from Rome and 
Fr&nce^ particularly those of the mannfactory at Limoges. 
Vide " LimogitL," in Du Cange ; Inventory of the Crown' 
Jewels, 3 £dw. III. Archeologia, vol. x. p. 241* After 
the victorious acquirement of France by Edward III. new 
luxuries, especially those of jewelry, splendid armour, and 
apparel, became more common, chalices (calices) or stand- 
ing cups for the altur, were then considered as most costly 
l>equests, and were marked with the arms of the donor in 
enamel. They w.ere usually accompanied with a paten or 
salver "calicem cum patina." The most ancient speci- 
mens of enamel, now known, are upon what is called the 
'' Iron Crown/' preserv€|d at Monza near Milan, and upon 
an ornament in theAshmolean Museum at Oxford, said to 
have belonged to King Alfred. 

, Id. Beds of sumptuous materials and workmanship in 
embroidery became a fashion with the nobility ; at first of 
inferi<>r stuffs. C^moke, camoka, chamiere, and came- 
lette, was a stuff originally made of camel's hair by the 
Orientals, afterwards of silk only, and called " camlette/' 
Du Cange* In Chaucer's Dreme we have : 

** Of downd of pure dove's white, 
I wol give him a fether bed, 
Raied wel with gold, and right wel clad 
In fine blacke sattin, d*outremere ', 
And many a pillow ; and every here * 
Of cloth of Raynes, to slepe on softe," 

* Extra marine^ beyond sea. * A sheet. 



XX NOTES IN EXPLANATION. 

Such a bed is depicted in an illuminated Froissart (MSS. 
Harl. 4380. Brit, Mus.) where the chamber and bed of 
Anne, Queen of Richard the Second, are represented. 
** Serica/' or silk, before the sixth century was unknown, 
as a manufacture, in Europe. From Greece it passed to 
Italy. In the thirteenth century Bruges was the chief 
mart. 

P. 50. The complete suit of the altar is comprehended 
in the word *' vestimentum,'' and in French '' une chapele 
entiere." Bishops have formerly bequeathed to particular 
altars in their cathedrals ** capellam meam." The inven- 
tories of the vestments belonging to the Cathedrals of Old 
St. Paul's and Lincoln astonish us with their number, va- 
riety, and value, as they are minutely described in Dug- 
dak'*8 Monasticon^ t. iii, A ** chapel entiere/' or whole 
suit, consisted of, 1. Casula, the cowl; S. Cupae, copes; 3. 
Dalmatica, upper robes; 4. Alba, a close surplice; 5. 
Amictus, amice, answering to a scarf richly embroidered 
with gold ; and 6. Stola» which went round the neck and 
hung down before. Du Cange and Lewis, and an Inven- 
tory of Church Furniture belonging to the Cathedral, in 
the Anliquitates Sarisburienses, 4to. 1814. 

P. 62« One of the earliest applications of the art of or- 
fievre or goldsmithry, was to the setting of rubies and sap* 
phires in rings^ clasps, and nouches, which were not po- 
lished after the modern method, but only worn smooth, 
before the close of the fourteenth century, when the cut- 
ting of diamonds into facets or polished surfaces, was first 

invented. 

P. 52. Chrystal and Beryl were applied to make small 
chalices, and the pyxis or corpora^, to contain the holy wa- 
fer, for the ministration at the altar. Chaucer describes a 

cup 

<< Which was made of burel and chrystall.*' 

Id. Beryl which Pliny (Nat. Hist. 1. 37) calls be- 
ryllus, is generally of a sea green colour, upon which gems 
have been engraved. But in the articles said to have been 
beryl, in several of these wills, it is probable that the small 
cups enumerated were of difierent agates, cornelians, or 



:N0T^S in EXPLANATION; XXI 

jasper btoDC. Iq Speghi^& Glossary to Chancer, the terul 
'' beryl/' means a fine green glass^ with which, a» Leiand 
informs us, the hall windows of Ludley Castle, in Glouces- 
tershire, were originaliy glazed* 

P. 54* Habergeon, haberson, a coat of mail *^ maille,'' 
(the mesh of a net.) Helmet, Salet Bacinet. Cuirass, 
covering the body before and behind. lambeux, coverings 
for the legs, made of ^^ cuir-bouille," leather boiled in oil. 
Gans or gauntletts, military gloves, studded at the joints 
with i^nobs* 

<* His jambeux were of cure buly, 
His dagger-sheath of ivory/* 

But lambeux must not be confounded with " gambison/' 
The latter was a sort of doublet or waistcoat, composed of 
many folds of linen, stuffed with cotton, wool, or hair, and 
generally covered with leather* Although worn chiefly 
under* the coat of mail to protect the body from being 
bruised by the stroke of the sword or lance, it appears to 
have been sometimes worn as a surcoat, and richly orna- 
mented. 

** Meint^ riche gambeson guami 

De soiei" &c. Roll of Karlaveroch 

Basilard was a short sword or dagger. There is a parti- 
cular account of the whole suit of armour or hamesse, as it 
was then called, in Chaucer's Rhyme of Sir Thopas. But 
the more curious reader is referred for complete informa* 
tion upon that subject to Mejfrick^s Ancient Armour, 5 
vols.folio, 1823. 

P. 66. An ouche has been substituted for a nouche, 
which is the true reading. JDu Gauge. It is applicable to 
a 42lasp, brooch, or buckle, some of the most useful orna- 
ments of female attire, usually composed of a stud of gold, 
set with pearls and precious^stodes. 

** Of fine rubies and diamaunds, 
And couched with perles, round and grete, 
In which ther was ful grete plentie, 
Of stones clere and fair to see«" 

Knight^s Tale and Romant of the Rose, 



XZll NOT£S IN SXPLANATtOK, 

The '* balas ruby,*' ** mbinus biilwus/' was that htU M 
the highest estimation by oar anoestorfl^ especially when of 
a large size. It is of a cochineal red, and somedmes car* 
mine, so called from Balaccan, the Indian name for PegOy 
from whence they were brought into Europe. The ''spi- 
nal pyropus is brighter/' Mention of balas rubies occnri 
very often in inventories and wills. In an inventory of the 
jewels belonging to Charles V. King of France, in 1879» 
we have '' Le signet du Roy, qui est de la teste dntoy sans 
barbe ; et est d'un fin ruby Orient ; et est celuy scelle ses 
lettres qu'il escrit de sa propre main." Montfaucmi Mon. 
Franc, tome m. Intaglios cut on rubies were more frequent 
afterwards; but no such attempt was made .upon the dia^ 
mond before 1500, when Chiaradossa of Rome engraved 
the head of one of the fathers upon a diamond for Pope 
Julius II. In the Catalogue of the Jewels sold by Charles 
the First, during bis^ troubles, is an account of the great 
collar of balas rubies, which had belonged to Henry the 
Eighth. It had ten of the finest balas rubies then known, 
Walpol^s Anecdotes, vol. it. Appendix. 

P.73. The Lordship of Poynings in Sussex. The at- 
taching the name of a barony to a jewel or a drinking 
horn or cup, and the conveyance of manors by the delivery 
of them to the acquirer, to be held in evidence of posises- 
sion, was by no means rare. Lyulph's horn at Y9rk, the 
Pusey horn, and the enamelled cup called the Lack of 
Eden Hail are amongst the best authenticated instances* 
jirckaologia, vol. UL p. 2. — Lysons* Cumherland. 

P* 74. These burning lights were placed round and 
upon the herse (la Chapele ardentp,'see 'Mofi/^Ottcon^ dur- 
ing the performance of obsequies. The square tapers of 
yellow and white wax weighed sometimes fiOlb, each. Mor- 
tars, '' mortiers/' were more like lamps, and were broad and 
flat of 10 lb. each. See p. 124. 

Id. When an Earl was invested with his Earldom or 
County, he was girt with a sword by the King in person. 
Milles. — Favine. — Selden. 

P. 76. Orfray, Aurifrigium, fringe or border of gold is a 
general description of whatever is wrought in gold, either 



if&m IK SXPLANATIOV. iXSLia 

,emlMid^y or: chacing in mefial Wbt^a /embroidered, it 
was « revy broad phgilaotery, woca by priests of thehigbeait 
-oideiB, la wbich.figuftas of -saiatS) or wb^a for chui!cb fur- 
Ditnrfe, tfae.amis. aad loiests . of the donors were repeated. 
The artecleft bere. enmnerated^ afford sufficient prpof^ that 
the/proficiency o&tbe goldsoiiths iu the fourteenth century 
ivaa^ great, when they finished figures, withia niches and 
canopies of the minutest workmanship and architectural 
precision. Charles V. of France,. in ISTd^ had an image 
-* un St. Denis qui tient son chef entre ses meins." Of the 
same age is the crosier bequeathed by W. Wykeham, and 
still preserved, at New College, Oxford. The " opus la- 
vatum" (Archaologia, vol. iv» p. 68) was gold or silver 
chased or embossed in relief, priiicipally in small vignette 
patterns, round the rims or edges of patens and spice 
dishes, and disposed in leaves, roses, and flowers. 

P. 77« There was a suit of armour and horse trappings, 
whibh were peculiarly adapted for hastibudes, jousts, and 
tournamentsy much more light and gorgeously ornamented 
than thoie used in the field of battle^ The curiosity of the 
inquirer into these splendours of antiquity will find a rich 
research in the MS. illuminated Froissart above cited, and 
Mantfaucods Slonarchie Framfoisef in which the most in- 
teresting historical miniatures are copied. In Hall's Chro- 
nicle <r»gn of Henry VUI.) the several parts of armour 
and apparelling of the combatants in those magnificent 
tournaments are described most minutely. 

P. 78* Nouches were made into various shapes in gold ; 
in this instance resembling an eagle displayed, enriched 
with jewels. 

V P. 84. It is curious to ascertain the different rates at 
which masses for the dead were valued. We have here 
7000 for 39/. Si. 4d. 

Id. Frontore was the hanging cloth of whatever 
stuflT, in the front of the altar, and when of the richest 
kind, frequently decorated with the arms of the donor, 
richly emblazoned in embroidery. 

P. 86. Vaisieux estotes, p'd'z, ponderis or pojz, standing 
cups. We see these,.and usually of large size^ ip several 



XXIV NOTES IM EXPLAl^ATION, 

illaminatioDS which describe great feasts and high tables^ 
as placed at intervals} or on the great cupboard which 
stood immediately behind the lord of the feast. They were 
distinct from chalices, solely applied to the altar, and were 
small and set with jewels in the stem and foot. Instances 
were not wanting of these ''standing caps" being very 
valuable for their weight, having been bequeathed to pur^ 
chase others of the* latter description and purpose. The 
inventory of Charles V. before quoted, gives, a list of the 
ornamental plate used at his high table, the dishes, 8ic. 
are omitted. 

Hanaps, canthari, 
Colettes, cululli. 
Argueries, aquales. 
Flacons, lagenae. 

Drageours, sacchari conditorum glibatorum, Vasa^ 

P. 67- Small pieces of the '*true Cross" were first 

brought into England by the Crusaders, as the most sa*- 

cred of all reliques, usually inclosed in crosses or other 

ornaments of gold, enriched with precious stones, and of 

such extreme rarity as to belong only to princes and 

nobles. Concerning the invention or finding of the true 

Cross by the Empress Helena, see GibborCs Roman Em- 

pire, vol. it, p. 202^ Svo. In process of time» there were 

few of the cathedral or larger conventual reliquiaries, ia 

which there was not found a fragment of the true Cross. 

The form of the Cross was the most sacred of the embeU 

lishments of the altar. Frequently of solid gold enriched 

with the most valuable jewels, and having the Crucifi^^ 

with the images of the Virgin' Mary and St. John standing 

at the foot. A letter, in the Cotton MSS. from R. Lay ton, 

one of the Commissioners for the Dissolution of Monaste-^ 

ries to Lord Cromwell, mentions, that the Abbot of Foua* 

tains, Yorkshire, had " caused his chaplain to stele the keys 

of the sexton, and took out a jewel, a cross of gold with 

stones ; one Warren, a goldsmith of the Chepe, was with 

him in his chambre at the hour ; and there they stole out a 

great emerode, with a rubye, the said W. made th' Abbot 

believe the rubye was a garnett, and so for that he paid 



^OT£S IN BXPLANATION. XXV 

notbingi for tbe emerode ^ ly* I have found no other evi« 
dence of thevalne of such stones in that or the preceding 
centuries. 

P. 87. Sepulchral monuments were chiefly of two sorts, 
large slabs of blue marble, inlaid with portraitures and in-* 
scriptions in brass ; and raised altar tombs^ bearing effigies, 
tcarved in marble or alabaster; and painted or emblazoned 
with gilt armour, and placed under the tabernacles of 
richest architecture. Consult GougVs Sepulchral Montis 
ineniiy and the exquisitely finished and accurate work by 
the late C. Stodhart, intituled, '^ Monumental Effigies of 
Great Britain" The effigies were of marble, bronze, or 
painted alabaster. 111/, is stated to have been the price 
agreed upon for that here mentioned* The figures of brass, 
with the portraitures described by indented lines, were ma- 
nufactured in Flanders and sent to England. They abound 
in the opposite maritime counties, and in those which had 
a commerce for wool. > 

The ^'Cbastel Philipe'' was a summer residence of the 
Earls of Arundel in Normandy, to which they resorted for 
retirement, and from whence this will is dated. 

P. 96* Richard Earl of Arundel bequeaths no less than 
three coronets. Above all other ornaments the coronets had 
the richest and the greatest number of jewels. CoronetSt 
when wome by ladies were called '* circles'' only. 

Upon the tresses of richesse 

Was set a circle for noblesse. 

Of breads gold." — *— Itomant of the Rose* 

Before this period a distinction had obtained between the 
copnets of Dukes and Earls, no others of the nobility being 
entitled to them. Selden's Titles of Honour • 

P. 100, 104» The best courser with his full trappings, 
or any part of the armour offered at the obsequies, became 
the mortuary due to the Church, in which they were per* 
formedr^ut redeemable* 

Pk 105. Pieces of tapestry placed at the back and sides 
of a table, and on the benches around it. *^ Dorcer d'arras,'* 
at the head of the high table. 



XXVI NOTES IN BXPnA^ATICm. 

* P. 1 0B. : Atm^ 'were ' beqa^ailied oto rcoUatecal^^ or the 
representativb's of heiirs^ female/ and sooiettmes to tUegiti^ 
mate sods. « 

P. I il. • Rjehdrd' Wrcbe (calkd Saint Ridkatd) was ca- 
nonized in 11260. Hid tomb or shrine in the South tran- 
sept, of the Cathedral at Chichesteri was held in such re^ 
spect by the people, that when commissioners were sent 
by Henry VIII. 1530/ to destroy it, they were content to 
deface it^only^by-a .wash of lime. The cist which oonr 
tained the body appeared never to have been opened* 

• The long military sword worn by King Edward IIL .may 
be seen as represented/ affixed to his sepulchral effigy in 
Westminster Abbey, and upon his great seal. Sanliford. 

Fanciful shapes of animals, adopted by heralds and 
borne as cognizances by the great nobles, were frequently 
cast or wtought in plate, particularly upon the covercles 
of the standing cups. 

' P. 1 15. Complete statues, in small, were sometimes 
wrought in silver, or even gold, to be offered at particular 
shrines. 

P. 119* Several places in France and Italy enjoyed 
great fame for their manufacture of specific ]>arts of ar* 
mour. The helmet made of steel at Bourdeaux ; the coat 
of D)ail made of steel rings at Naples; the sword at Tu* 
raine ; all of them of such rare quality as to be worth be- 
queathing. The '' fermaile,'' clasp or broche, placed on 
the breast of females, which usually bore the shape of a 
heart, sometimes inscribed with a single letter. 



a 



A broche of gold full shere, 



On which was written a crowned A.'* Chaucer* * 

P. 126. An instance of the entailing a bed of estate, 
among many others. 

P. 127. The book called *' Arthur de Bretagne," one of 
the most popular of the French Romances, in the thir- 
teenth century, and often copied for ihe use of the nobility, 
splendidly gilt and illuminated. " The Historye of the 
moost noble and valyaient Knyght, Arthiir of Lyttd Bry- 



wrras m EMJfhAMMmov. xxvii 

tayxiei trimalktBd M^ of Fre&slie into Eoglyi&he, by the 
noble Johiftp ISottTgchier, Knyght, Lorde Bamers, newly 
imiprynted by Robert Copland, 154^" Herbert's Hiatatjf 
of Printings p. Sl^l* 

In this Ashmolean Maseum^ Oxfordf there is a ▼ery cartoutf 
and beaniifulMS.of the History of Arthur and his Knights'; 
and their atchievenient of the Sang-real. It is in folio; 
on vellum, the irntials are illuminated and the chafptersare 
adorned ;with; head-pieces, expressing the story, whidh iar^ 
painted and iUnminated, in which we see the fashion of an-i 
cient armour building, inanner of tiking; and other paKi<^ 
culars. Warton (on Spencer) considers this MS. of con- 
siderable antiquity •*> Codd.Ashmoleffol.S2Bj and in tb^ 
Bodleian (v. Digby; 1284. 223) ; and Hyper. 4092. 27; tare 
the same MS. 

P. ISO. The Bible, when first translated into Latin, was 
divided into four or six parts. In the will of Richard 
(Sanctus) Bishop of Ghicbester, he bequeaths to the four 
orders of friars, each one part (1258) '' glosatam, '' which 
means, with marginal notes. In the next century, the! 
Bible was translated into French, illuminated, with a com^ 
mentary, and bound in two volumes covered with velvety 
^ich clasps of gold,' enamelled with the arms of the prince 
or nobleman at wbose expense tbe^MS. was made. Psalters 
were more common. Missals were so splendid as to have 
miniatures qpon every page, and were wrought with jewels 
upon the covers of velvet. The Bedford missal, exceeded 
perhaps by none, is still perfect and In this country, now 
belonging to the Earl Spencer. 

A pair of decretals ^' une paire decretales in Fraunceis.*^ 
Lady Clare,>in ' 1360, '' un Hngutioh*' to accompany them. 
Hugh de Vercellis, • Bi&hop of Ferrara, was a celebrated 
writer upon the decretals, which were the determinations of 
the Popes, on certain questions of ecclesiastical law. 

P. 134* This service of plate for the table was one^of 
the largest possessed at that time by any of the nobility. 
It consisted of - chargeours," very capacious dishes, these 
are sometimes called */ flat pieces," to receive the joints of 
meat> platters or . dishes, plates, apice-dishes/ salt-sellers,* 



XXVIU NOTES IN EXPLANATION.' 

pbrringef^i and sancers* In the Collectanea Cariofta^ yoI* 
ii, p. 283, is an account of Cardinal Wolsey's plate, given 
in by his goldsmith, Robert Ainadal, in 1518, more than a 
century after the date of this will, which communicates cer-« 
tain information* The price of new silver varied from 5s. 
4c. Sd* to Ss. lOd. an ounce. An image of our Lady, SCO 
ounces in sterling silver, . Six great candlesticks made at 
Bruges, with leopards heads andcardinal's hats, chased and 
gilt, 298 ounces at Sc, lOd. an ounce. A 8pice«>plate, all 
gilt and enamelled, called Edward of Carnarvon (as having 
once belonged to that unfortunate prince) brought from St. 
Alban's Abbey. 

The Cardinal's Service of Plate. 

Three chargeours 197 ounces, £5. platters 968 ounces, 
22 dishes 451 ounces ; summ' l6l7, at 3s. 4d.2S9L lU. Sd. 
The usual weight of platters was 36 to 40 ounces each, 
dishes 20 to 25 ounces, saucers 12 to 15 ounces. A cup 
of corone gold 64 ounces, 134/. and 5s. an ounce for the 
making. The unexampled splendour of Wolsey's (easts is 
proved by (MS. Harl. No 428.) an extract from his life by 
Cavendish. ** There was a cupboard, being as long as the 
chamber was in breadth, with six deskes in height, gar* 
nysbecl with guilt plate, and the nethermost desk was gar* 
nyshed all with gold plate, having with lights one paire of 
candlestickes of silver and guilt, being curiously wrought, 
which cost three hundred markes. This cupboard was 
barred round about, that no man might come nigh it ; for 
there was none of all this plate touched in this banquet, 
for there was sufficient besides* The curious reader may. 
consult the AfSS. HarL 1418. for the Household Fur- 
niture of King Heniy VIIL; Inventories, of Jewels and 
Plate belonging to Edward IIL Prince Henry, and. 
Charles I. in the Archteohgia. 

P. 136. The manufacture of worsted stuffs was esta* 
blished at Norwich in the fourteenth. century. 1380. 

P. 137. It may be regretted that a catalogue of these: 
English and French books has not been given«. . . 

P. 140. Arras of the finest quality was of sufficient, es.-. 
timaliou to constitute apresent from one prince to another^. 



NOTES IN EXPLANATION* xxix 

The more common sort was called " vervayes/*' consisting 
of green trees, with labels and mottoes. 

P. 145. We learn that 500 marks were to be paid for 
two tombs erected in Bisham Abbey, Berks, for the Earl of 
Salisbury (lSd8) — destroyed. 

P. 146. A marble slab, with two portraitures of brassy 
iulaid 10/. 

P. 147. Pater-nosters, or, as sometimes called, a " pair 
of beads," were made or coral, cornelian, or jet, and for the 
common people of wood. Chaucer's Prioresse has 

'' Of small corall about her arm, she bore, 
A paire of bedes "— — 

The bequests of a '^ tonel of good wine" to Priors and 
Convents were usual. There are several royal grants ex* 
tant of a tun of wine from the port of Bristol to the con- 
ventual hermits (Cistertians) of Whiteham, in Somerset- 
shire, &c. 

This will recites many books, of which some account is 
offered. 

1. ^' A Chronicle of France, in French. Such were, by 
no means, uncommon, having been compiled and finely 
written out for some prince or noble. 

2. ** ^gidius Romanus de regimine Principum," con- 
jectured by Weston to have been translated into English 
by John Trevisa. A MS. intituled, ** Regime des Princes 
par Gillesde Rome, a Monseigneurs fils da Roy Philipe Le 
Bel,'' was in the library of Gal way Mills, Esq. in 1800. 
This was stated to have been translated from the Latin of 
^gidius Romanus, into French verse by Henri de Gauche. 

3. " Virtues and Vices." 

4. '' Historic de Chevalier de Cigue, Chiveler Assigne, 
that is. The Knight of the Swau.'' In the British Museum 
(E. 6. N^. 9. fol.) is a copy, in French verse, aa likewise in 
the Royal Library at Paris. This popular romance was 
printed both by Wynkin de Worde and Robert Copland^ 
" translated out of French at th'instigation of the most 
puyssant prince Lorde Edward Duke of Buckingham/' 
1512. This patronage was occasioned by the swan 



XXX. NOTES IN £X|»LANATION. 

having b^en the cogoiaance of the Dukes of Bocki^g* 
ham. 

5. '' Legenda Aurea/' written by Jacobas de Voragine' 
Archbishop of Genoa (1^90), from which Gaxton^ through 
the mediam of a French version^ intituled, *' Legende Do- 
ree," translated his '' Golden Legend/' which' be printed in 
1483, under the patronage of William Earl of Arundel. 
Detached Lives of Saints, not in this collectioQi fire not 
among the more rare antieot M SS. 

6. '' Meisteres Histoires/' is. a corruption of Commes- 
tor*s Scholastic History, translated into French. 

7. ''De Vitis Patruiil." The Vitae Patrum, from Sh 
Jerom and [Johannes Cassianur. Warton. This MS. was 
printed by Wyhken de Worde in 1495v. 

6. /' St. Gregoiys Pastoral Care." A M9. aC tUs book 
belonged to the monks of Winchester Cathedral. Wiaatmi^ 
They were epistles directed to the Church in his epiaoopal 
character. 

. It may not be deemed irrelewMOLt^to the general purpose 
of elucidation, to add, in this place, a slight^account of the 
fidest illuminated MSS. 'now to be found in Enghmdc • 

1. The Histories of Fibitsart, now in the British Mn»^ 
seum, Harl MSS. No .4380, large folio, written about 1590. 
Montfaucon,inhi8 Monarchie Fran9oi8e, hib copied, si- 
milar illuminations from two copies of equal curiosity, one 
in the Royal Library, N^ 8320, and the other in that o£ M. 
Colbert. 

£. Legenda Aorea. Folio of the largest • size, bound in 
green velvet with silver clasps. Translated intOcFcenchby 
Jean de Vignay, at the request o'f Jane, wife of Philip 'de 
Valois, about 1330, containing more than 200 miniatures 
of the martyrdoid of saints. Now in the collection of the 
Duke of Norfolk. 

. 3. The Sherburne Missal, dated 1339. It is a large foIjo> 
purchased at the sale of G. Mills, Esq* in 1800, by the late 
Duke of Northumberland, for i^lO/. 

4. La Bible Historiaux. A large folio, abounding in il* 
luminations. Brii. Mm. Kitig'^ MSS. 19 D. 2. This book 



NOTES IN EXPLANATION* XXXI 

was laken at the battle of Pai<AierS| by Willfam Montacute 
Earl of Salisbary. Written before 1S50. 

5. The Bedford Missal, eleven inches long by s^ven atid 
half wide with gold clasps. At the sale of the Duchess of a 
Portland*s Museum (1786) Edwards the bookseller gave 
£15/. for it. The Duke of Marlborough gave 7So/. foi' it, 
and it has been since! purchased by EafI Spencer. It was 
originally presented by Jacqueline Duchess of Bedford to 
her nephew K. Henry'VI, 

. P. 154. This posikwnaus hospitality Was subsequently 
extended to still greater excess. 

The cup> salt-seller, and knives and forks^ were those re- 
ceived^ as a fee at a coronation. 

P. 160. Portfore, portiforium/portehorsy and breviarium, 
or antiphonarlum, and^ as it is frequently added, '^ beneno- 
tatum.'' Itcotitained the antiphonal service, with musical 
notes, and accompatiied the missal. ' These- services were 
after the different usages of formularies of the Cathedhil 
Churches of York and Sajrum. This Was printed, iii 1509, 
by Wynkin de Worde; V 

A coverlet or quiltfbr a bed, composed of ermine, which 
were made of velvet and sattin, ELudpdned, with ermine, in 
stripes or borders. We h^ve here the price of a ponraitdre, 
in a tabard of arms, as introduced into a large window, not 
of a window entire. The basilard was Cbe.dagger or small 
sword, which was worn in the ^une belt with the long one, 
of which all the armed, figures in the fourteenth and fif* 
teenth centuries give an example. In the representations 
of burgesses and merchants of the same age, the long 
sheathed knife, hilted and sheathed with ivory, inlaid with 
silver, is likewise called a baslard, and is suspended in 
front. The ^* anlace" was smaller and used as a knife. ^ 

*' And on that other side a gaie daggere 

Hi^mesed well and sharpe as ppinte of spere." Chaucer, 

P. 164. ** My book of Tribulation/' a small missal, con-- 
taining the seven penitcintial psalms. 

P. 187. Hopolandes, huyks not furred, were military 
cipkes made of coarse cloth, and worn by common soldiers 



xxxu NOTES IN bxplanation; 

The^ <' hauberk'^ was a complete coveribg of double' chala* 
mail. Brigandines were the pieces of armour riveted knd 
jointed for the arms and thighs, made of steeli and lined 
with silk or velvet. This kind of armour came into use 
about the time of the battle of Agincourti when the gorgets 
and cuirasses of chain mail were abandoned* Morions 
were close caps of steel. Chaucer has bassinets for heU 
mets* Plate or scale mail is called '^ sqaammat^ vestis.** 

P. 196. *^ A man to go to the Holy Land, to the sepuU 
chre of our Lord.'' This vicarious service of devotion was 
recommended by the first preachers of the Crusades, in the 
thirteenth century. At first, no person could be sent but 
of a rank equal to the testator, which involved the greatest 
difficulty. Money was subsequently left to insure the pay 
of common soldiers. 

P« e09. The book called Tristram. ** Le Roman de 
Tristram et Iscuit traduit de Latin en Fran^ois^ par le Chi^ 
valer Lucas.'* He was one of Arthur's companions ; after- 
wards introduced by Spenser into his poem of the '^ Faerie 
Queen." See the Romance of Morte Arthur. 

P. 2 18. In these small hearses was placed the effigy of 
the deceased, modelled in wax, painted and gilt. 

P. 225. /'Aplaneofmynevre/' small pieces of colored 
furs, menu vair^ (see p. 16 1), and used for the coverlet of 
a bed. ^' Marters/' fur of martin's skins. 

*' Bason of silver pounced with morys letters,*' pounson* 
nez, indented or pricked with a sharp pointed instrument, 
a method of ornamenting plate used by the Morescos, or 
Moors in Spain, in patterns or shapes of flowers, but prin«* 
cipaUy for letters. 

. P. 227. Wills written in English were not customary 
before the reign of Henry IV. whose will is the first extant^. 
Bishops and ecclesiastics used Latin, and the nobility, Nor- 
man French. 

P. 231. ^' A cup of gold with the dance of men and 
women." This is a curious specimen of the art of emboss** 
ing and chasing in relievo upon gold. It cannot be deter- 
mined at this time, whether the dance was a Morescb or 
Morris Dance, or was conducted by a figure of a skeleton, 



NOTBS IN EXPLANATIOV. XXXUl 

to persoAiff Death, a subject so freqaenilj represented in 
Irescoy upoQ the walls of cloisters, as, in the first instancey 
at the iDOOceots at Paris, with verses written by Maceha- 
br^, one of the monks. See DugdaU*t St. PauFs Cathedral. 
The four effigies of silver gilt, here recited, were of course, 
melted down at the Reformation. But his monumental 
effigjy cast in latten and gilt, still remains, in his sepulchral 
Chapel at Warwick, one of the finest and most perfect spe- 
cimens of the kind now extant in England. Three plates 
of it are given in C. Stodhart's exquisite work. From a 
MS. Computus of the expenses of this Chapel it appears, 
that to W. Austen 40/. were paid for casting the figure; 
to Barth. Lambspring for chasing IS /. ; and for gilding 9^ /• 
^t,Bd,\ total 148 /• 2<. Sd. exclusively of the tomb itself. 

P. 239. ** My great templys with baleys." An ornament 
of gold set with rubies, placed upon each temple, and de- 
pendent from the head. This fashion prevailed with ladies 
of quality in the reign of Henry the Sixth. 

P. 241. The goldsmiths of that age were ranked with 
the professions of the arts, as architects and sculptors. 
Stephen Allovius had doubtless a fame which greatly en- 
hanced the value of his works, lie was goldsmith to John 
Duke of Bedford. 

P. 244. Flaggons *' pelves/' covered pitchers for wine. 
Bowls were small, and used in the same manner as drinking 
glasses now are, before the invention of that most elegant 
and useful material, glass, which then was never so applied. 
The '' maser-bowl," was so denominated, because ori- 
ginally made of the maple-wood, having the rims tipped 
with silver, which kind are the most ancient. They were 
subsequently made of plate, retaining the generical name ; 
and were used to contain mulsum, hydromel, or metheglin. 
The original was the " waeshaill bowl/' 

P.2oO. Tablets were small boxes pr caskets of gold or 
silver, enriched with amber or agate, and studded with 
jewels, to contain the host, 

P. 250. "Ledum blodium" A barbarous word used 
to signify bright or blood red. '* Panno aufco de Da- 
masco," cloth of gold worked in a damask pattern. 

c 









XXXIV W>TB9 IN fiXPLANATIOM; 

P* (355. Vases or cups of gold, in distincdon to tablets, 
used as above-mentioned. 
P. 277. A collar of gold for her neck. '' Chevisaile/' 

''About her neck of gentil entaile (goldsmith's work) 
Were set the riche Chevisaile 
In which there was ful grete plentie 
Of stones clere and fair to see.** RomarU of the Rote. 

P. 284. A Cfaesible. This was a cope shorter than the 
principal cope and not close, as that was, but open on 
either side, so that the priest who wore it had the free use 
of his hands. On the fore and hind part of it was embroi* 
dered a large cross* It was worn at high mass both by the 
priest and deacon. When of the richest materials they 
were of *' velvettes" or " damasceene" cum aurifrigio. 
Lewis. This is a curious instance of parental authority in- 
the marriage of daughters. Upon referring to the pedigree 
of Vele, of Almondsbury, in Gloucestershire, it appears 
that the marriage so strictly enjoined did not take place. 

P. 304. Vows of voluntary widowhood were made be- 
fore the Ecclesiastical Court of the Diocese. But in the 
middle ranks of life widows were restricted from second 
marriages, or concealed concubinage, which, when de« 
tected, occasioned the total forfeiture of dower, or legacy 
from their husbands, a provision to that effect having been 
made in the wills. 

P. 328. *' For three years after my decease." The cele- 
bration of masses for any term of years was maintained by 
a rent^charge upon the testator's estate for the time speci* 
fied. In cities and large towns it was more usual to grant 
rents of houses, which were then to return to the right heir, 
so that the alienation became temporary only. 

P. 324. This circumstance ascertains the price of land^ 
or antiuity issuing from land, to have been, in 1471, at 
twenty years purchase, or five per cent. 

P. 325. The spiceres and pepper boxes were then 
usually made very large, and set exactly in the middle of 
the high table. Their shape was that of a tower, castel- 
lated and triple turreted, into which different kinds of 



MOTES IN XXPLANATION. . XXXV 

ftpSces weire placed^ of which our ancestors were inordi- 
oatelj fond. They were of the finest wrought silver, parcel 
gilt; and were sometimes called '^ standing pieces." 

P. 326. If Chaucer's company had been solely com- 
posed of these vicarious pilgrims, we should have lost his 
inimitable Canterbury Tales. 

p. S29« An altar cloth of Ypres manufacture for the 
celebratioiv of the Sacrament. 

P. 367. Psalterium glosatum, above mentioned. 

P. 380. " Our Ladye of Puc." " Our Lady of Pitye," 
an image of the Virgin sitting, with the body of Christ 
extended across her lap. Notre Dame de Piti6. Madonna 
d^lla PietiL most common on the Continent. 

P. 384. Friars " Observants or Recollets," were of the 
oriler of St. Francis " strictioris observanti." It is uncer- 
tain whether this house at Greenwich was ever endowed. 
I'anner^s Notii. Monast. 

P. 435. A small bracelet of gold or gold chain. 

P. 442. This bequest of 1000/. by Thomas ^farquis of 
Dorset, in 1501, to his unmarried daughters, for their por- 
tion, is more than was given in general to the daughters of 
the higher nobility. 

P. 445. '' Unam Cathinam," means a chain of gold 
worn over the neck. 

P. 452. '^ Countrefeit arras" was an imitation of arras, 
in needlework of worsted or silk. 

P. 466. In a shSrt period after the general introduction 
of coat armour, escocheons both carved and painted were 
introduced into churches. In stained glass we have in- 
stances as early as the reign of Henry III. and of those af- 
£xed to the walls carved and emblazoned, the most re- 
markable as being still in a perfect state, are those of 
noblemen in Westminster Abbey of the same date. When 
tombs with effigies became common, tbe instances were 
very numerous. The motive for their being placed near 
shrines, namely, to Excite the pious to pray for the souls 
of tbe d^ceas^, I do tiot recollect to have seen before. 

P. 468. The provision of 20/. a year allowed to the 
younger son of a nobleman or an esquire untler age, was 



XXXVI NOTES IN JBXPLANATION. 

considered as ample in thai age. The diftiribution of ^00 
'shirts^ &c. at the funeral was a much more beneficial h^ 
quest than the more usnal mode of distributing monej ia 
dole. 

P. 471* Diamonds, in conseqoence of a belter method 
of polishingy had risen into higher estimation. 

P. 473- In Fleetwood's '^ Chronicum Preciosom/' ift is 
stated that a fat wedder sheep sold for Ss. 4d. in 153S» 
Allowing the hundred sheep to be worth 3 s. «ach the 
legacy would amount to 15 /. 

P. 486. The common or domestic habit of the clergy at 
the Reformation and subsequently^ varied, in a small de* 
gree only, from that of men of their own rank and condi- 
tion in life. 

P. 495. The sum of twenty shillings mustbave been the 
least usually paid for that description of sepulchial mouu* 
ments. 

P. 496. A memorable instance of the increased usage of 
silver vessels for the table, among persons of a degree iar 
below the order of nobility, and a proof of the opulence 
supplied by commerce. 

P. 506. The turquois. Chaucer enumerates it among 
other jewels. 

•< No sapphire Inde, no ruby riche of price 
There lacked then, nor emeralde so greene, 
Bal^» Turkcs." Court ofLove^v. 8a 

In the Merchant of Venice, Shylock exclaims, '' It was my 
Turquois, I would not have given it for a wilderness of 
monkies." Act iii. sc. 1. The Turquois or Turkey stone, 
of a light blue colour, but opake, is found on mountains on 
the confines of Persia. It was said that it faded or 
brightened in its colour, as the health of the wearer 

increased, or abated. 

« 

'* And true as Turquise in my dear lord^s ring 

Look well or ill, with him." Ben JohnsorCs Sejanus* 

It likewise has an extraordinary quality attached to it, no 
less than of taking away all enmity, and of reconciling, a 
man to his wife. 



NOTES IN ESCPLAMAaiON. XXIVll 

P.' 554. A hftlMength portrait of Lord Edward Howard, 
less than life, on pannel^with his shield of arms blazoned 
in the comer, is preserved at Norfolk House, London. The 
coimtenance fully expresses an air of dignity; and the de- 
termined courage, for which he war celebrated, above any 
of the contemporary commanders. 

P. 586. These were called ** Apostle's spoons." and were 
usually of silver gilt, having each the figure of an apostle 
affixed to the end of the handle. They were given, either 
singly or in complete sets, by the sponsors at baptisms, 
with reference fireqaently to the Christian name of the 
ehild; and specimens of them are still preserved by the ad- 
mirers of old plate. 

P. 538. Milo Salley, Bishop of LlandafF, was origittally 
a Benedictine Monk at Eynsham, near Oxford, which cir^ 
Gumstance accounts for this legacy. He was afterwards 
Abbot of Abingdon, and a principal benefactor to the re- 
building of the western front of that magnf6cent church, a 
very few years only before the suppression and destmction 
of it. Leland's Itin. vol. n. p. 1 7. 

P. 544. The Cistertian Abbey of Geronden, in Leices« 
tershire, founded in 1 139* At the time of the suppression 
it contained fourteen monks, whose revenues amounted to 
186 M5s. Tanner. 

P. 548. In the reign of Henry the Eighth the fashion 
of gold chains was carried to a most sumptuous excess, and 
their weight in solid gold was so great, as to be positively 
inconvenient. The chain here mentioned, as worth 140/. 
must have weighed, allowing for the workmanship, more 
than two pounds troy. When the King condescended to 
give one to any individual courtier, as a mark of his 
favour, weight constituted the value more than workman- 
ship. 

P. 554. This is the first injunction of the kind, which 
has occurred as extended to a whole library, but which has 
rarely been kept, for more than two generations. 

P. 566. See Dugdale's History of St. PauFs. 

P. 610. These long directions concerning the prayers 
to be respectively repeated by illiterate men, and at certain 



XlXVUi NOTES IN EXPLANATION. 

hoart df die 6^j, are partkolnrlj minute/ ai&d prorre tbAta 
knowktlge of Latiik meteorite^ Was all that was domidered 
ta be necessary. 

P. 666. Few modern wills exhibit a cladse of more con* 
siderate benevolence than this of th6 worthy SherifT of 
London. 

P. 67K This is a yery singular instance of proTidfaig 
fdr the sepulchral monuments of his friends which had been 
neglected by others. 

P. 680^ It appears from this bequest, that a notion of a 
greater efficacy was given to a single prayer uttered by a 
thousand priests, than to its being uttered a thousand times 
by the same individual ; yet in the same will there is a pfo- . 
visa that thiee priests shall sing a requiem, daily, for 
twenty^two yeara after the decease of the testator. 

P. 719* It has been observed that collars or chains of 
gold Were of very considerable ponderosity ; we have here 
an instance of one of sitffficient Weight to be recast iAto a 
cup, worthy the acceptance of a King, whose favour to 
Charles Brandon never variedi through a life of tyranny, 
crarity, and caprice* 

P. 7^2. This is, perhaps, the earliest instance of the es-> 
tablishnient of lecture sermons, for the informattion of the 
laity upon doctrinal points, which will be fotind in wills, 
made immediately consequent, upon the Reformation. 

P. 725. The price of a sepulchral memorial^ composed 
of niarble and brass, appears heife to be incredibly low. 
The^ brass figures were manufactured in the Netherlands 
and imported heref they were of all sorts and sizes, and 
suitable to the rank and circumstances of each person to 
be represented. They were called " pictures of brasse/' 

P. 727- This is a more splendid instance. The men 
were habited in their tabards of full armorial bearings, 
sottietimes enamelled in their proper colours. 

P. 7SS. Tbese several bequesU of gilt plate prove that 
the usual presents of sovereigns to foreign ambassadors 
were cups of great weight and most splendid workmanship^ 
and Aot jewels. 



HOTMS W £XPLANATIOM. XXXiX 

P, 734. William Flowery Cbester HeraU. 
Henry Fellow, Gutnes Parsuivant. 

Noblest Hist. ColL Arm p. 187. 

p. 743. The HsmaUtes or bloodstoae, coasidered as a 
specific against certain disorders. Diamonds, were th^n 
pointed or table cut. 

P. 749. Nicholas Myites was not illegitimale; but. the 
good widow so distinguished him from the other legatee, 
her son«in*law. 

P. 760. This legacy is nearly the standard of what was 
considered to be a sufficient provision of a younger daugh- 
ter of an English gentleman in 1559. 

P. 76l« After his establishment in this see he became 
eminent for his diffusive charity to the poor, no less than 
the zeal with which he preached to the people, who followed 
him by thousands, and for whose immediate sustenance he 
performed a miracle. In the bull of his canonization the 
bread estimated for ninety is stated to have satisfied the 
hanger of 3000 persons. He was then resident in his manor 
of Ferring. The bequest of portions of the Bible, trans- 
lated into Latin, with a paraphrase or glosa, in the early 
part of the thirteenth century, proves how few, even of the 
larger monasteries were provided with them. The splen- 
dour of the furniture of this canonized prelate, and the 
number of his retinue, will appear from his testamentary 
bequests, by which he is shown to have been a kind mas- 
ter, if it be said that his manner of living was too worldly 
for an ascetic and saint ^ 

The following circumstances, narrated in the Lives of 
the Saints (Lond. 4to, vol.ii. p. 26)9 but ill accord with the 
account of his wealth specified in his will; a document of 
too certain authenticity to be disproved by the following 
assertions : ^^ He kept an exact list of all the paupers in his 
diocese, whom he supplied with his own hand. As their 
number increased he sold his plate^ all his furniture which 
was not necessary, and even his horse, when he had no other 
convenience of travelling." What need then, could there 
be for '' Johannes Alexander custos palfridorum meorum 
& roeliorem, palefridum meum; and the cupse urgentese." 



Il 



NOn9 IN EXPLANATTON. 



How could they remain to be dispoged of in the wiH above- 
mentioned ? Hi^orj^ of Western Sussex. 

P. 766. The completion of the nave of the Cathedral of 
Winton, was the last great work of W. of Wykeham. His 
will was dated in 1403, but he had prosecuted it for ten 
years previously to his death in 1404. It is, both in style 
and dimensions^ the most magnificent nave in £ngland« 
There is a peculiaiity in his will, demonstrative of his he^ 
uevolence, which is extended to those of the lower as well 
as of the higher ranks, by the wide diiFusion of the great 
wealth which he had acquired. 




TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



HENRY II. 

JlIenry, by the grace of God, King of England, Duke of 
Normandy and Aquitaine, Count of Anjou*, to King 
Henry*, to Richard', Geoffrey*, and John', my sous, to 

' Henry the Second, Count of Anjou, son and heir of Geoffrey 
Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, by Maud, widow of the Emperor Henry 
IV. and daughter and sole heir of King Henry I. by his first wife 
Maud, daughter of Malcolm III. King of Scotland. He ascended 
the throne October 25, 1154, and died at Chinon, in Normandy, 
July 5th, 1189. Henry's predecessors* testamentary dispositions 
have not been deemed requisite to be introduced into this work, 
especially as they are fully given in Nichols* Royal Wills. 

* His second, but eldest surviving son, who was born in 1 1 54, 
and was crowned King of England by his father's command in June 
1170, which accounts for his being styled *' Henrico Regi :*' he 
died at the Castle of Martel, in Normandy, in 1 182, s. p. William, 
the eldest son of King Henry II. was born in 1 152, and died in the 
following year. 

* His third son, who succeeded him as King Richard I. 

* Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of Anjou and Poictiers, Henry*s 
fourth son, was bom in 1 158 ; he married Constance, daughter and 
heir of Conan IV. Duke of Britanny and Earl of Richmond, by 
whom he had issue Arthur and Eleanor, and died yit& patris at 
Paris, in September 1186. On the death of Richard the First, Ar- 
thur, his only son, became heir to the throne, and in right of his mo- 
ther was styled Duke of Britanny, and is supposed by some historians 
to have been dispatched by his uncle King John circa 1202. He dying_.^^^»^^^ J^ 
without issue, his sister Eleanor succeeded to his claim to the 
crown ; she was seized by King John, and confined in the Castle of /i^^ 
Bristol, but survived until the year 1241, when she died without /a«j» Afi^a 
issue, and was buried in the Church of the Nunnery of Ambres- 
bury. 

* John, Henry's youngest son, succeeded his brother Richard 
as King of England. Vide his will, p. 5. 

B 



c 



2 TESTAMENT A VETUSTA. 

Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, Archdeacons, Deans, Earls, 
Barons, Justices, Sheriffs, &c. and all other my faithful 
subjects, as well clerks as laymen of my territories, within 
and beyond the seas, greeting. Know ye, that at Waltham, 
in the presence of R. Bishop of Winchester *; J. Bishop of 
Norwich • ; G. Chancellor, my son ' ; Master Walter de 
Constantiis, Archdeacon of Oxford ; Godfrey de Lucy, 
Archdeacon of Derby; Ralph de Glanville; Hugh de 
Morewic; Ralph Fitz Stephen, Chamberlain ; and William 
Rufo; J have made division of some part of my money in 

this manner : To , &c. To the religious houses of 

England mmmmm marks of silver, to be distributed by the 
hands of R. Archbishop of Canterbury % R. Bishop of 
Winchester*; R. Bishop of Worcester; G. Bishop of 
£ly^; and J. Bishop of Norwich; and Ralph de Glan* 
ville, Justiciar of England. To the religious houses of the 
land of the Earl of Anjou, my father, m marks of silver; 
towards the marriage of poor and free women of England 



' Richard Tocliffe^ alias More, Archbishop of Poictiers ; he was 
Bishop of Winchester from 1 172 to 1189. 

* John of Oxford, Dean of Salisbury 1175—1200- 

3 Geoffrey, his natural son, by the celebrated Rosamond Clif- 
ford ; he was made Archdeacon of Lincoln, and, according to some 
writers, was afterwards elected Bishop of that See, but neither 
Beatson nor Hey]3m assert him to have been so. In 1191 he be- 
came Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor, but had his whole 
estate seized by King John, and after five years* banishment died 
in 1213. Most authorities state him to have been appointed Chan- 
cellor in 1191, but it is evident he filled that office at the date of 
this will in 1182. 

* Richard, Prior of Dover, who succeeded Thomas k Becket in 
that See in 1 173. 

s Baldwyn, Abbot of Ford, translated to the See of Canterbury 
on the death of the above-mentioned Richard in 1 184 ; he crowned 
King Richard the First, followed him to the Holy Land, and died 
at the siege of Ptolemais. Vide Rapin's History of England, vol. 
i. p. 354. 

* Geoffrey Ridall, a Baron of the Exchequer andLord.Trea- 
surer. 









T£STaM£NTA V£TUSTA. 3 

wanting aid ccc marks of gold, to be distribated by the 
hands of R. Bishop of Winchester, B. Worcester, G. Ely, 
and J. Norwich, and Ralph de Glanville*. Towards the 

^ Ranulph de Glanville was one of the most celebrated men of 
his times ; Dugdale gives the following account of him : << He was 
born in the town of Stratford, and obtained the Lordship of Ben- 
hall from King Henry the Second, as also a discharge for five hun- 
dred acres of wood in Bramam, assarted ; that is to say, that those 
assarts should not be subject to any exaction relating to the forest. 
In ^0 Henry II. upon that rebellion of young Henry (whom the 
King had unadvisedly crowned in his own life-time) and the inva- 
sion of the King of Scots on his behalf, this Ranulph assisted Wil- 
liam de Vesci in raising the siege which the Scots had then laid to 
Proudhow Castle, and with a slender army gave them battle near 
Alnwick; wherein, obtaining a signal victory, he took the King 
himself prisoner. In 25 Henry II. he was one of the Justices Iti- 
nerant then sent into the Counties of Nottingham, Derby, York, 
Northumberland, Westmoreland, Cumberland, and Lancaster, and 
the next year advanced to that Office of Justice of England. In 
28 Henry II. he was present with the King at Waltham, and one 
of the witnesses to this testament there declared. And in 34 
Henry II. the King having great disturbances in his territories be- 
yond the seas, he was thence sent into England to raise what power 
he could to his aid. 

Moreover from 10 Henry II. to 16' Henry II. and half that year, 
and from 22 Henry II. till the end of that King's reign (sell. 34 
H. II.) he executed the Sherifialty of Yorkshire by his substitutes. 
Also, for Lancaster in 21 H. II. and for Westmoreland in 23, 24, 
and 25 H. II. But in the reign of Richard the First he was dis- 
placed from his office of Justice of England, and Hugh de Pud- 
sey. Bishop of Durham, put in his stead. Whereupon he accom- 
panied King Richard (together with Baldwin Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, and Hubert Bishop of Salisbury) in his journey towards 
the Holy Land ; and at Marseilles taking ship thitherwards, arrived 
at Aeon, being at the siege of that city, but departed this life the 
same year, during that leaguer. As to his works of piety, he 
founded the priory of Battele, in com. Suffolk, in anno 1171} 17 
H. II. for Canons-regular of St- Augustine's Order, and plentifully 
endowed it. As also the Abbey Ley stone, in com. Suff. for Canons 
of the same order. And having married Berta, the daughter of 
Theobald de Valoines, senior. Lord of Perham ; with whom he had 



4 TESTAMENT A VETUSTA. 

marriage of poor and free women of Normandy wanting 
aid c marks of gold^ to be distribated by the Archbishop of 
Rouen, and the Bishops of Bayeux, Avaranches, Sagien* 
sis. Toward the marriage of poor and free women of the 
land of my father, the Earl of Anjou, c marks of gold, to 
be distributed by the Bishops of Maine and Anjou. This 
distribution I have made at the place before written, in the 
year of the Incarnation 1182. And I charge you, my sons, 
by the fealty you owe me, and the oath ye have sworn to 
me, that ye cause it to be firmly and inviolably kept; and 
whoever shall oppose or contravene it, may he incur the 
indignation and anger of Almighty Cod, and mine and 
God's malediction. And I command you, the Archbishops 
and Bishops, by the oath ye have sworn to me, and the 
fealty ye owe to me and to God, that ye solemnly, in your 
Synods, with lighted candles, excommunicate, and cause to 
be excommunicated, all such as may presume to infringe 
my distribution. And know ye that our Lord the Pope 
has confirmed this my distribution, under his hand and seal, 
on pain of anathema*. 



the whole Lordship of Brochous, in which the priory of Battele was 
founded, had issue by her three daughters, viz, Maud, Amabil, and 
Helewise ; unto whom he gave all his lands before he went toward 
Jerusalem. This Maud had the whole Lordship of Benhall, 
with the advowson of the Church there ; and took to husband Sir 
William de Aubervile, Knight. To Amabil the Second he gave 
the moiety of the Lordships of Baudesey, and Finebergh ; which 
Amabil married to Ralph de Ardeme ; and to Helewise, the third 
daughter, the moiety of those Lordships of Baudesey and Fen- 
bergh^ who became the wife of Robert Fitz Ralph, Lord of Widle* 
ham, in com. Ebor." vol. i. p. 494. 
♦ Royal WiUs, p. r. 



TE8TAMBNTA VSTUSTA. 



JOHN. 



I, John', by the grace of God King of EDgland, Lord 
of Ireland, Bake of Normandy and Acquitaine, Earl of 
Anjou. 

Imprimis, I will that my body be buried in the church 
of St. Mary and St. Wulstan of Worcester. I appoint 
the following to be my executors : G. by the grace of God 
Cardinal of St. Martin, and Legate from the Apostolical 
See; P. Bishop of Winchester* ; R. Bishop of Chichester 3 ; 
S. Bishop of Worcester*, "fratrem Aimericnm de St. 
Maura ;*' W. Marshall, Earl of Pembroke ; R. Earl of 
Chester'; William Earl Ferrers*; William Bruwne; Wal- 
ter de Lacy; and John de Monemut, Savaricum de Malo- 
Leone ; Foulk de Breante *. 



HENRY HL 

I, Henry, by the grace of God King of Eoglaud and 
Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy, Acquitaine, and Earl 



* King John was the youngest son of King Henry the Second, 
and was bom in 1166. He succeeded to the throne on the death 
of his eldest brother, Richard I. April 6, -iSiy and died at Newark 
October 19th, 1216, and was buried in the Cathedral of Worcester. 

* Peter de Rupibus, from 1204 to 1243. 
' Richard Poore, 1115 to 1217- 

« Silvester de Evesham, 1216 to 1218. 
' Randal Blondeville. 

* He was Earl of Derby from 11 9I until his death in 1246. 

* Royal Wills, p. 13. There is no date to this will, but it is 
evident, from Silvester being described as Bishop of Worcester, 
that King John made his testament but a short time before his 
death, as that Prelate was not elected Bishop of that see until 
the year 1216; his predecessors during the reign of King John 
being Maugerey Dean of York, and Walter Gray, who was 
translated to York in 1217* ^^' 



6 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

of Anjou", on the Tuesday • next after the feast of the 
Apostles Peter and Paul, in the year of grace 1253, at 
Suthwyk, proposing to go into Gascony % make my will in 
form following. I will that my body be buried at the 
Church of the Blessed Edward of Westminster, there 
being no impediment, having formerly appointed my body 
to be buried in the New Temple of London. I commit the 
guardianship of Edward my eldest son and heir% and of 
my other children, and of my Kingdom of England, and of 
all my other lands of Wales and Ireland, and Gascony, to 
my illustrious Queen Eleanor s, until they arrive at full age. 
Also, I bequeath the cross which the Countess of Kent* 

* Son of King John ; he was bom in 120T» and succeeded his 
father October 19, 1216 ; he died at St. Edmond's Bury, Novem- 
ber 16th, 1272, about nineteen years after the date of his will. 

* IstJuly. 

3 '< Anno 1253. The Gascon nobility were attached to the Eng- 
lish government, because the distance of their sovereign allowed 
them to remain in a state of almost total independence, and they 
claimed some time after Henry's protection against an invasion 
which the King of Castile made upon that territory. Henry re- 
turned into Guienne, and was more successful in this expedition, 
but he tliereby involved himself and his nobility in an enormous 
debt, which both increased their discontents^ and exposed him to 
greater danger from their enterprises.*' Hume's England,- vol. ii. 
p. 167. Suthwick, where Henry's will is dated, was probably 
Southwick in Hants, where formerly was a Priory of Black Canons, 
and which became of some notoriety from its having been the scene 
of the nuptials of Henry VI. and Margaret of Anjou. Its proxi- 
mity to the sea renders it very likely to have been the place 
where Henry. III. sojourned immediately previous to his embark- 
ation. 

« Afterwards King Edward I. 

* She was the daughter and heiress of Raymond Earl of Pro- 
vence ; married to Henry in 1236, and died in the Monastery of 
Ambresbury, to which she had retired, about the year 1292. 

' Margaret, daughter of William the Lion^ and sister of Alex- 
ander, Kings of Scotland, who married Joan, sister of Henry III. 
She married Hubert de Burgh anno 5th Henry III. who in the 
13th of that reign was created Earl of Kent, and died 1243 ; she 
died in the year 1259. 



TESTAMENXA VETUSXA. 7 

gsive me, to the small altar of the aforesaid Church of Ed- 
ward of Westminster, and I appoint my aforesaid Queen ; 
Boniface Archbishop of Canterbury * ; Aymer, elect of 
Winchester', and Richard Earl of Cornwall, my bro- 
thers'; Petri de Lebaudia, John Maunsell, ^'Prsepositi Be- 
verlye, "Peter Chiceporm, Archdeacon of Wales, John Prior 
of Newburgh, my Chaplains ; John de Gray, my Steward ; 
and Henry de Wengham, my Secretary*, my executors *• 



EDWARD I. 

In the namie, &c. We, Edward, eldest son of the noble 
King of England, make our Will the Saturday ^ next after 
Pentecost, in the year of our Lord 1272. First, we be- 
queath our soul to God, to our Lady, and to all Saints; 
and our body to be buried where our executors, that is to 
say. Sir John de Bretagne^ Sir William de Valence, Sir 



> Boniface of Savoy. 

* Ajoner de Valence, Henry*8 half-brother. Isabel, the widow of 
King John, married, secondly, Hugh le Brun^ Earl of March, in 
the confines of France and Pottou, and by him she had William de 
Valeiice and Aymer de Valence, so called from the place of their 
birth. William de Valence was a distinguished Baron temp. Hen. 
III. and aflerwards became Earl of Pembroke. Aymer de Va- 
lence^ who is styled in Henry's will " Adomari Wintoniae electi/' 
became Bishop of Winchester in 1!3249. 

* Richard, younger son of John and brother of Henry III. was 
Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans ; he died in 1272. 

* « Clerici mei." * Royal Wills, p. 15. 
s June 18th. 

* Apparently John^ eldest son of John first Duke of Britanny, 
and Earl of Richmond, in England. He was brother-in-law to 
Prince Edward, having married his sister Beatrix ; and he accom- 
panied him to the Holy Land in 1269. Dugdale, Bar. vol. i. p. 51 ; 
and Histoire de Bretagne, torn. i. p. 195. Dugdale, however, 
contains an erroneous statement on the subject of the Dukes of 



8 TESTAMBNTA VITUSTA. 

Roger de Clifford, Sir Payse de Chautros \ Sir Robert de 
Tiletot% Sir Otes de Graundisoo, Robert Burnett*, and 
Anthony Bek«, shall appoint; who are also to hold the 
profits of all our lands in England, Ireland, and Gascony, 
until our children become of age. And if it should so 
happen (which God forbid !) that our Lord the Kingi our 

Britanny, for he manifestly confounds John de Bretagne, who 
married Beatrix, daughter of Henry III. with his father, John, first 
Duke of Britanny, surnamed le Roux. A reference to that work 
will be suflicient to show that this assertion is correct, whilst it is 
only necessary in this note to give the real facts of the case from 
the '< Histoire de Bretagne,** which unquestionably on this point 
is authentic. Peter de Dreux married in 1213 Alix de Bretagne, 
eldest daughter and coheir of Guy de Thouars, by Constance 
Duchess of Britanny, the daughter and heiress of Conan IV. 
Duke of Britanny, and widow, first, of Geoffrey Plaatagenet, bro- 
ther of King John ; and, secondly^ of Ralph Earl of Chester : by 
Peter de Dreux the said Alix, who died in 1291, had several chil- 
dren ; John J. suroamed le Roux, Duke of Britanny, the eldest 
son, married in 1335 Blanch, daughter of Thibaud Count of 
Champagne, and died in 1286, leaving issue John II. Duke of 
Britanny, who married in 1259 Beatrix, sister of Prince Edward, 
and was the executor naimed in that Prince's will. Dugdale says 
that, by letters patent dated 6th July, 52 Henry III. 1268, that Mo- 
narch granted the Earldom of Richmond to John Duke of Britanny, 
son of Peter 4th Duke of Britanny ; and goes on to state, that he 
buried Beatrix, his wife, daughter of King Henry HI. in the Grey 
Friars, London, in 1275* The Earldom of Richmond was un- 
doubtedly possessed by John le Roux, son of Peter de Dreux ; 
and it appears that that Prince went to the Holy Land, as is 

[there 

' Query ? Payne de Chaworth, who was in that expedition to 
the Holy Land. Dugd. i. p. 517* 

^ Most likely Sir Robert Tibetot, who, Dugdale informs us, 
« was a trusty servant of Prince Edward's for divers years, and 
attended him into the Holy Land.** .Vol. ii. p. 38. 

> Query if Robert Burnell, who was also in that expedition, 
and was drowned at Nevyn, anno 1282. Dugd. ii. p. 61. 

* This Anthony Bek was afterwards Bishop of Durham from 
1283 to 1311, and likewise Patriarch of Jerusalem, &c. Dugd. 
ii. 4^47. Heylyn. 



TESTAMENTA VITUSTA. 9 

fkth^y die whilst our children be uuder age^ we will that 
the realm of England, and all other lands which should 
descend to our children, remain in the hands of our execu- 
tors before named, and also in those of our dear father the 
Archbishop of York, and Sir Rog. and other great men of 
the kingdom, until they become of full age. And for the 
dowry of our dear wife Eleanor \ &c. In testimony of 

there mentioned ; but it is equally certain that his son John, after- 
wards Duke of Britanny, also went thither at the same time. Soon 
after the Earldom of Richmond was granted to liis father, this 
John was styled '< Comte de Richmond,'* and in the '< Histoire de 
Bretagne*' it is thus related : 

'<Le Due de Bretagne, le Comte de Richemont, Alphonse 
Comte de Poitiers, Thibaud Roi de Navarre, et Gui Comte 
de Flanders, furent de nombre des Princes Crois^. Pierre de 
Bretagne auroit sans doute pris le m^me parti si la mort n'aYoic 
enlev£ k la fleur de son &ge. II mourut le 19 jour d*Octobre, de 
I'an 1968, et fut enterr^ aux Cordeliers de Paris. Le Comte de 
Richemont, son fr^re,. passa en Angleterre pour demander au Roi 
Henri la permission de faire la voyage d'Outremer, et d'engager 
une partie du Comte de Richemont, pour la somme de deux mille 
marcs d*argent, qui 6toit oblig^ d'emprunter, avant que d'aller 
k la Terre-Saint. Le Roi lui accorda toutes ses demandes, et lui 
promit en outre que 8*il mouroit dans son voyage, ses ex^cuteurs 
testamentaires jouiroient du Comt^ de Richemont, jusqu'k ce que 
ses dettes fussent acquitt^es. Cette promesse est dat^ de l^est- 
minster, le ^ Janvier, 1969." 

<< Le Perte de ce Proems n*emp^ha pas le Due de partir pour 
Marseilles, le 17 Avril, de Tan 1^70. II ^toit acoompagn^ de la 
Duchesse Blanch son Spouse, du Comte de Richemont son fila, 
et de Beatrix d' Angleterre sa belle fille." Tome t. p. 195. 

In tom. i. p. 1002, of <* Memoires pour servir de Preuves k 
THistoire de Bretagne,*' the grant alluded to by Dugdale is 
printed ; as is likewise a letter from Henry IIL on the restitution 
of the said Earldom; and p. 1018 of the same volume contains the 
promise alluded to above. Very extensive, and, it is presumed, 
authentic pedigrees of the houses of the different Dukes of Bri« 
tanny, and of their various branches, will be found from p. xiii. to 
XXX. of tome i. of that extremely valuable work. 

^ Eleanor, daughter of Ferdinand III. King of Castile, his first 
wife, she died in 1396. 



10 T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 

wUch we have placed our seal to this Will, having re- 
quested John Archbishop of Sur, and Vicar of the Holy 
Church of Jerusalem, and the honorable fathers, Frere 
Hugh Revel, Master of the Hospital, and Frere Thomas 
Berard, Master of the Temple, likewise to place their seals 
in witness hereof. Dated at Acre, the Saturday before 
named, the 18th June, in the year of the reign of the King 
our father the 55th 'i^. 



EDWARD ni.» 

In the name, &c. We, Edward, by the grace of God, 
who hold the sceptres of the Kingdoms of England and 
France, according to the custom of our ancestors. Kings 
of England, we appoint our royal burial to be in the 
Church of St. Peter of Westminster. We bequeath, &c. to 
found masses for our soul, and the soul of Philippa, our 
dear consort, late Queen of England*. We give to our 
future heir Richard, son of Edward Prince of Wales', 
our eldest son, an entire bed, marked with the arms of 
France and England, now in our palace at Westmin- 

* Royal Wills, p. 18. It is singular that Edward I. did not 
make another will afler he succeeded to the Crown; he died 
July 7th, ld07> thirty-five years after the date of the above ; in the 
date of which, however, tliere is a trifling discrepancy, for at the 
commencement we find, << le Samedis prochein apres la Pentecouste 
en le an de nostre Se3mur mil deu cent septsaunt secund ;" and 
at the end, " Done a Acre, le Samedy avaunt nome, le disutime 
jur de Juen, Tan du regne de nostre pere cinkaunt e sine'* Henry 
the Third ascended the throne 19th October, 1216, hence June 
18th, 1272, must have been in the ^dy -sixth year of that monarch's 
reign. 

' His father Edward II. died intestate. 

* Philippa, daughter of the Count of Hainault, whom he mar* 
ried in 1328 ; she died at Windsor in August 1369. 

3 Afterwards King Richard II. son of Edward, the heroic Black 
Prince, who died v. p. Vide his will, p. 15. 



TJESTAMENTA VETUSTA. H 

»tBr. To Johanna, late wife of the aforesaid Edward, 
6ur eldest son *, one thousand marks. To our dear 
daughter Isabel, Countess of Bedford, for her support 
and that of her daughter', three hundred marks per 
annum, arising from the lands of the son and heir of the 
Earl of Oxford, lately deceased, which Thomas Tirell, Knt. 
holds from us, so long as the said heir shall be under age. 
We appoint executors of this our will, our son John, King 
of Castile and Leon and Duke of Lancaster ^ ; John Bishop 
of Lincoln'; Henry Bishop of Worcester*; John Bishop 
of Hereford'; and our dear and faithful Knights William 
Lord Latimer; John Knyvet, Chancellor; Robert de Ash- 
ton, Treasurer; Roger deBeauchamp, Chamberlain; John 
de Ipres, Steward ; and Nicholas de Care;f, Keeper of the 'W/ 
Privy Seal 7, We also appoint supervisors of this our will 
the Reverend Fathers in Christ Simon Archbishop of Can- 
terbury % and Alexander Archbishop of York.^ Given, 
written, and ordained in our royal manor of Haveryngge 
atte Bower the 7th of October, 1376, and of our reign .in 
England the 50th, and of our reign in France the 37th, in 
the presence of our trusty and beloved John de Burleye, 

* Joan, daughter and heir of Edmund of Woo.dstock, Earl of 
Kent. Vide her will, p. 13./'--^ '^-•^^^^^ ^^•.fc***n//6 ...: • **» c^i*>\ 

^ Isabel, daughter of Edward IIL married Ingelram de Coucy^ 
grandson of Leopold Duke of Swabia, who was created Earl of 
Bedford anno 1366, and died 21 Richard II. ; by her he had two 
daughters, Mary, who married Robert de Barr ; and Philippa, who 
became the wife of Robert de Vere ninth Earl of Oxford; his fa- 
ther, Thomas eighth Earl, died 1st August I37I9 leaving his son a 
minor, out of whose lands the above sum was to be paid. He became 
of age in 1383, and was afterwards the celebrated favourite of 
Richard II., by whom he was created Marquis of Dublin and Duke 
of Ireland, and K. G. 

* John of Gaunt, his fourth son. 

* John Bockingham. * Henry de Wakefield. 
' John Gilbert, who became Bishop of Hereford in 1376. 
7 Nicholas de Carew. 

' Simon Sudburv, who was beheaded by the rebels under Wat 
Tyler. 

' Alexander Nevil. 



13 TESTAMEKTA VETUSTA. 

Richard Sturreie, and Philip de Vacbe^ Knights ; William 
Surete, Comptroller of our Honshold; John de Beverlye; 
Walter and John de Salesbury, Esquires of oar Chamber ; 
and many others, with Walter de Skirlawe, Doctor of the 
Canon Law. Proved before Simon Archbishop of Canter- 
bary, at Lambeth, 25th June 1377 *• 



EDWARD PRINCE OF WALES-. 

In the name, 8lc. We, Edward, eldest son of the King 
of England and France, Prince of Wales, Duke of Com* 
wall, and Earl of Chester, the 7th June, 1376, in our apart- 
ment in the Palace of our Lord and Father the King at 
Westminster, being of good and sound memory, 8cc.* 
We bequeath to the altar of Our Lady's chapel at Canter- 
bury two basons with our arms, and a large gilt chalice 
enamelled with the arms of Warren. To our son Richard* 
the bed which the King our father gave us. To Sir 
Roger de Clarendon « a silk bed. To Sir Robert de Wal* 
sham, our Confessor, a large bed of red camora, with our 
arms embroidered at each corner; also embroidered with 
the arms of Hereford ^ To Mods. Alayne Cheyne our bed 
of camora powdered with blue eagles. Aud we bequeath 
all our goods and chattels, jewels, 8cc. for the payment of 
our funeral and debts ; after which we will that our execu- 
tors pay certain legacies to our poor servants. All an- 

'~-| 1— 1— ^ WMMw— Ji . I m ■ ■ T ■ rr ■ ■ i— fij i |- -« - _ |--- ' iii — 

* Royal Wills, p. 59. King Edward III. died June ^l, 1377. 

* Edward^ the celebrated Black Prince, eldest son of King 
Edward the Third, born 1350, died June 8, 1376 ; thus his Will 
was dated the day before his death. 

* Here follow long directions relative to his tomb, with several 
pious bequests, but none of sufficient importance to be re-printed 
here, excepting what is retained in the text, as the Will is printed 
at length in Nichols* " Royal WiUs.*' 

' Afterwards Richard II. 

* Supposed to have been his natural son. 

^ Most probably the arms of Bohun, Earls of Hereford. 



TKSTAMSNTA VETUSTA. IS 

nuitiet which we have given to our Knights^ Esquiresi and 
other our followers, in reward for their services, we desire 
to be fully paid. And we charge our son Richard, on our 
blessing, that he fulfil our bequests to them. And we ap- 
point our very dear and beloved brother of Spain, Duke of 
Lancaster ' ; the Reverend Fathers in God William Bishop 
of Winchester % John Bishop of Bath'; William Bishop 
of St. Asaph *; our Confessor, Sir Robert de Walsham ; 
Hugh de Segrave, Steward of our Lands ; Aleyn Stokes ; 
and John Fordham, our executors* In testimony of which 
we have put to this our last will our privy seal, &c. 

Published by John Ormesheved, Clerk, in the year 1376, 
in the presence of John Bishop of Hereford ^^ Domini 
Lewis Clifford, Nicholaa Bonde, and Nicholas de Scharnes- 
ford, Knights, and William de Walsham, Clerk, and of 
many other Knights, Clerks, and Esquires. Proved 4 idus 
June, 1376 ^* 



JOAN PRINCESS OF WALES ^ 

In the name. Sic. In the year of our Lord 1385, and of 
the reign of my dear son Richard, King of England and 

' John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, who assumed the title of 
King of Castile and Leon, in right of his second wife Constance, 
daughter and co-heiress of Peter the Cruel, King of Castile. 

* William de Wyckham, Lord Chancellor, 
s John Harewell. 

« William de Spridlinton. * John Gilbert. 

* lOth June. * Royal Wills, p. 66. 

' She was daughter of Edmund Plantagenet, sumamed of Wood- 
stocke, younger son of King Edward I. and sister and sole heir of 
John Plantagenet, Earl of Kent, and from her extreme beauty 
was styled the Fair Maid of Kent. She entered into a contract 
of marriage with lliomas Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, but Sir 
Thomas Holland, K. G. on a petition to Pope Clement VL alleging 
a pre-contract, and that he had had '< carnal copulation" with her, 
but that, he being abroad, the Earl of Salisbury unjustly kept her 



14< TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

France, the 9ih, at my Castle of Walyogford, in the Dio* 
cese of Salisbury, the 7th of August, I, Joan Princess of 
Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Countess of Chester, and 
Lady Wake. My body to be buried in my chapel at Stan- 
ford, near the monument of our late lord and husband, the 
Earl of Kent. To my dear son the King, my new bed of 
red ¥elvet, embroidered with ostrich feathers of silver, and 
heads of leopards of gold with boughs and leaves issuing 
out of their mouths. To my dear son Thomas Earl of 
Kent, my bed of red camak paied wdth red and rays of 
gold. To my dear son John Holland, a bed of red camak. 
To my dear son Richard, King of England and France, &c. 
And I appoint the Venerable Father in Christ, my dear 
friend and cousin, Robert Bishop of London '; William 
Bishop of Winchester*; John Lord Cobham ; William de 
Beauchamp, William de Nevill, Simon de Burlee, Lewis 
Clifford, Richard Atterbury, John Clanvow, Richard Stury, 

from him, his Holiness gave her to Sir Thomas, who in her right be- 
came Earl of Kent. By the said Earl, who died 1359, she had seve- 
ral children, amongst whom were Thomas Earl of Kent, and John 
Holland, alterwards Duke of Exeter, named in her Will. In the fol- 
lowing year her beauty attracted the famous Edward the Black 
Prince, who accordingly married her, and she became by him mother 
of King Richard XL There is in Harl. MSS. 6148, from which part 
of the extracts in this volume are taken, a note of a certificate from 
Simon Archbishop of Canterbury, to Edward Prince of Wales, dated 
8th October, 1361, which alludes to the Bull from Pope Innocent, 
granting a dispensation for his marriage, he being within the limited 
degrees of kindred, and for christening her eldest son; '< where- 
upon," it is observed, << many scandals may arise. Item, that she 
was afore contracted to Thomas Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, 
after to Thomas Holland, Knight, and betwixt whom grew strife in 
that cause before the Pope*s seat; but judgment was given against 
the Earl, and she remained wife to the Knight, and the Earl, there- 
with content, married another noble lady at Lambeth, in presence 
of Roger Lord Dewarr, Edward Courtney, James d*Audley, 
Ralph Spignurnell, Nicholas Lorenye, and Thomas de Felton, 
Knights;' She died in 1385 at Wallingford Castle. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 648, ii. 75, 94. Collins*s Peerage, vol. ii. p. 65* . 

' Robert Braybroke, Chancellor of England. 

• William de Wyckham. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 15 

John Worthe, steward of my lands,, and John le Vache, 
Knights; together with my dear chaplains, William de 
Fulburn and John de Yernemouth ; and my loving esquires, 
William de Harpele and William Norton, my executors. . 

Witnessed by the Prior of Walynforde and John James. 

Proved 9th December, 1385*. 



RICHARD IT. 

In the name, &c. We, Richard, by the grace of God 
King of England *, appoint our body to be buried in the 
church of St. Peter of Westminster, in the same tomb 
with Anne, sometime our consort, and Queen of England ^ 
Item, to our dear nephew, Thomas Duke of Surrey', xm 
marks; and to our dear brother^ Edward Duke df Albe- 
marle, MM marks. To our dear brother John Duke of 
Exeter ^ mmm marks. To our beloved and faithful Wil- 

* Royal Wills, p. 78. 

' Richard II. e ld t rt son of Edward the Black Prince, succeeded 
his grandfather, Edward III. June^lst, 1377, died February l8th 
or 14th, 1400, having been dethroned September 29th pre- 
ceding. 

* Ann, his first wife, sister to the Emperor of Germany, who 
died 8. p. in August 1395. 

' Thomas Holland. He was eldest son of Thomas second Earl 
of Kent, son and heir of Thomas first Earl of Kent, by Joan 
Plantagenet, whose Will is inserted in p. 13. He was conse- 
quently nephew of the half-blood to King Richard. In 1397 he 
succeeded his father in the Earldom of Kent, and was created 
Duke of Surrey 29th September in the same year ; and in 1400 
was beheaded for attempting to replace Richard on the throne. 

* In the copy printed in Rymer's Foedera, vol. viii. p. 75, it 
stands, *' dilecto nostro consanguineo," which correctly describes 
the relationship to Edward Duke of Albemarle, he being his first 
cousin ; viz. son and heir of Edward Duke of York, brother to 
Edward the Black Prince^ father of Richard. 

^ John Holland, Duke of Exeter, was brotlier of Thomas second 
Earl of Kent above-mentioned, and was therefore also half- 
brother to Richard ; he was attainted and beheaded for joining 
the conspiracy against Henry IV. in 1400. 



l6 TESTAMENT A VETUSTA. 

liam Scrope, Earl of Wiltshire, mm marks. Whereas, 
when the Reverend Father, Roger Archbishop of Canter* 
bury, was our treasurer, 8cc. ' Item, We will that all jewels 
which came to us with Isabella §, our dear consort. Queen 
of England and France, remain to her if she survive us. 
To this Will we appoint the Venerable Fathers in Christ, 
Richard Bishop of Salisbury', Edmund Bishop of Exeter \ 
Tideman Bishop of Worcester ^ Thomas Bishop of Car- 
lisle % Guy Bishop of St. David's^; our dear brother Ed- 
ward Duke of Albemarle"; Thomas Duke of Surrey, 
our nephew; John Duke of Exeter, our brother; aud 
William Earl of Wiltshire, to each of whom we bequeath 
one golden ring ; also, our beloved and faithful Richard 
Clifford, Keeper of our Privy Seal ; Richard Maudeleyn, 
William Irereby; and John Ilkyngton, Clerks, and John 
Lufwyl^ and William Serle, Laymen, our executors. We 
likewise appoint supervisors of this our will the Reverend 
Fathers in Christ Roger* Archbishop of Canterbury, and 
Richard Archbishop of York *% William Bishop of Win- 
chester ", and William, Abbot of the Monastery of West- 



^ Roger Walden was Secretary to Richard II. and Treasurer of 
Calais in 1395. He was elected Archbishop of Canterbury, but 
rejected by Pope Innocent VII. who afterwards confirmed him 
Bishop of London. 

* Daughter of Charles King of France. At that time she was 
not more than fourteen or fifteen years of age, but of whom it is 
evident Richard was extremely fond. Isabel returned to France 
soon after the death of her husband. See the Translation of a 
valuable Metrical History of the death of Richard II. with very 
interesting Notes, by the Rev. John Webb, in the 90th volume of 
the Archsologia. 

3 Richard Thetford. . jUdjfiu. . 4 Edmund Stafford. 

* Tideman de Winchcomb. * Thomas Merks. 
7 Guy de Mona. ' Vide Note * in preceding page. 

* Hiomas Fitz-Alan is said to have been Archbishop of Canter- 
bury from 1396 to 1414; and it does not appear that there ever 
was an Archbishop of Canterbury called "Roger." 

** Richard Scrope, brother to the Earl of Wiltshire mentioned 
in Richard*8 Will. 

»» William de Wyckham. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 17 

minster; Edmond Duke of York, our uncle'; and Henry 
Earl of Northumberland^ our cousin. Written in our 
Palace at Westminster, the l6th April, in the year of our 
Lord 1399, and of our reign the 22d, in the presence of the 
Reverend Father Robert Bishop of London % and the noble 
and brave men, John Marquis of Dorset', Thomas Earl of 
Worcester, and others*. 



HENRY IV. 

In the name of God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, 
three Persons and one God. I, Henry, sinful wretch, by 
the grace of God King of England and of France, and 
Lord of Ireland *, being, &c. First, 1 bequeath mj' soul, 
&c. and my body to be buried in the church of Canter* 
bury, after the discretion of my cousin the Archbishop of 
Canterbury ^ And also, I thank all my Lords and true 
people for the true service that they have done to me, and I 
ask them forgiveness if I have misentreated them in any 

* Edmund Duke of York was brother of Edward the Black 
Prince, and father of the Duke of Albemarle, whose relationship 
to Richard is pointed out In Note S p. 15. 

* Robert Braybroke. 
' John Beaufort, son of John of Gaunt by Catherine Swinford, 

and legitimated by Act of Parliament temp. Richard II. It is 
worthy of remark, that although he was, if considered legitimate, 
first cousin to the King, Richard does not dignify him by calling 
him his relation. 

* Royal Wills, p. 191- 
< Son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and grandson of 

King Edward IIL bom 1367, ascended the throne September 29, 
1399, died March 20, 1413. 

* Thomas Fitz-Alan, generally called Thomas Arundel, son of 
Richard Fitz-Alan, fifth Earl of Arundel, by Eleanor, daughter of 
Henry Earl of Lancaster; hence he was first cousin, once re- 
moved, to Henry IV., his mother being the sister of Henry Duke 
of Lancaster^ whose daughter and heiress, by marrying John of 
Gaunt, was mother of that monarch. 






18 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

wise. And I also devise, that of my goods restitution be 
made to all them that I have wrongfully grieved, or any 
goods had of theirs without just title. Also, I will that all 
my servants be rewarded after their desert; especially 
Wilkyn, John Warren, and William Thorpe, Grooms of 
my Chamber. Also I will and pray my son that he have 
recommended James de la Crois, that hath well and truly 
served me, and also in the same wise Jacob Raysh and 
Halley. I will that the Queen* be endowed of the 
Duchy of Lancaster. I ordain and make my son the 
Prince* my executor; and to fulfil truly all things afore- 
said I charge my foresaid son upon my blessing. Wit* 
nessing my well-beloved cousins, Thomas Archbishop of " 
Canterbury aforesaid, and Edward Duke of York ' ; Tho- 
mas Bishop of Durham*; Richard Lord Grey, my Cham- 
berlain; John Tiptoft, my Treasurer of England'; John 
Prophete, Warden of my Privy Seal; Thomas Erpiog- 
ham*, John Norbery, Robert Witerton, and many others, 
being present. In witnessing whereof, ray privy seal by 
my commandment is set to this my testament, at my ma- 
nor of Greenwich, the SJst day of January, in the year of 
our Lord 1408, and of our reign the tenth*. 

* His second wife, Joan, daughter of Charles II. King of Navarre. 
^ Afterwards Henry V. 

* Edward, son of Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, the bro- 
ther of John of Gaunt, and consequently first cousin to Henry IV. 
was restored to the title of Duke of York 7th Henry IV. He lost 
his life at the battle of Agincourt, where << it is said that he desired 
of King Henry that he might have the foreward of the battle that 
day, and had it; and that by much heat and thronging, being a 
fat man, he was smothered to death." He married PhiHppa, 
daughter and co-heir of John Lord Mohun, hut had no issue. 
Dugdale, vol. ii. pp. 156, 157. 

« Thomas Langley, Cardinal and Lord Chancellor. 
^ Iword Tiptoft and Powis, Treasurer of the King*s Household, 
died 21 Henry VI. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 40. 

* Installed Knight of the Garter temp. Henry IV. ; he was like- 
wise a Knight Banneret, Chamberlain of the Household, and Lord 
Warden of the Cinque Ports, and died circa 1429. Buswell, No 110. 

* Royal WiUs, p. 203. 



TESTAMENTA VBTU8TA. 19 



HENRY V. 

In the worship of the blessed Trinity, of our Lady Saint 
Mary, and of all the blessed Company of Heaven^ 1/ 
Henry \ by the grace of God King of England and of 
France, Lord of Ireland, at making of these present letters, 
I ordaine and dispose to pass into the parts of France to 
recover, by the help of God, my rights there to me belong* 
ing, do write my will and intent in manner after following. 
Forasmuch as before this time I have feoffed Henry Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury*; Henry Bishop of Winchester*; 
Thomas Bishop of Durham <; Richard Bishop of Nor- 
wich*; Edward Duke of York*; Thomas Earl of ArundeP; 
Thomas Earl of Dorset'; Ralph Earl of Westmoreland; 
Henry Lord Fitz-Hugh ; Roger Leche, Walter Hunger- 
ford*, and John Phelip, Knights; Hugh Mortimer, John 

* Son of Henry IV. He was bom in 1388; succeeded his 
father March. SoUi, 1413; and, afler a short but glorious reign 
of little more than nine years, died at Bois de Yincennes, in 
France, August 3l8t, 14S2, about five years after the date of his 
Will, which, although apparently made in consequence of his in- 
tention of invading France, was, however, written above a year 
before his second landing in that country, as,* according to Hume, 
that event took place on the 1st of August 1418. HJs first attempt 
was in August 1415, and on the 25th of the October following 
he gained the celebrated victory of Agincourt, and immediately 
afterwards returned to England. 

* Henry Chicheley, Cardinal, 1414—1443. 

> Henry Beaufort, Cardinal and Lord Chancellor, 1405 — 1447. 
« Thomas Langley, Cardinal and Lord Chancell6r, 1406 — 1438. 
s Richard Courtenay, Bishop of Norwich in 1413, and died in 
Normandy in 1416. 

* Edward Duke of York, who lost his life at the battle of Agin- 
court, as has been remarked in a preceding Note, in 1415. 

7 Thomas Fitz-Alan, Earl of Arundel, K. 6. and Lord Trea- 
surer, died in 1415, s.p. 

* Thomas Beaufort, K. G. Lord Chancellor and Lord Admiral, 
was created Duke of Exeter 18th November, 1416, and died 29th 
December, 1426, s. p. 

* Knight of the Garter and Lord Treasurer, ob. 1449. 

c 2 



20 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Wodehouse, and John Leventhorp, Esquires, in the Castle 
and Lordship of Higham Ferrers, and in other lordships, 
lands, &c. to me descended as to son and heir after my 
Lord my father, Henry of Lancaster, last before me King 
of England and of France, Lord of Ireland, the which God 
assoile. And at the same time I enfeoffed the said feoffees 
in the Castles and Manors of Halton and Clyderhow, 
which to me descended in manner aforesaid. And now it 
is so that the aforesaid feoffees, Richard that was Bishop 
of Norwich, Edward that was Duke of York, Thomas that 
was Earl of Arundel; Roger Leche, and John Phelip, 
Knights, and Hugh Mortimer, Esquire, be dead : where- 
fore I will that the aforesaid Archbishop, Bishops of Win- 
chester and Durham, Thomas now Duke of Exeter and 
Earl of Dorset, Ralph Earl of Westmoreland, Henry Lord 
Fitz-Hugh, Walter Hungerford, Knight, John Wode- 
house and John Levenihorp, Esquires, now being alive, 
do, if I die without issue, enfeoff my right heirs in the 
aforesaid Lordship and Castle of Higham Ferrers; also 
that of all my Castles, Lordships, Sic. in the North part of 
England, my said feoffees to enfeoff my brother, John 
Duke of Bedford*, to him and the heirs male of his body; 
and if my said brother John die withput heirs male of his 
body, that the same remain to my heirs, Kings of England. 
Also, [ will that my said feoffees do enfeoff my brother 
Humphry Duke of Gloucester* of all my Castles, Lord- 
ships, Sec. in the South part of England, to him and the 
heirs male of his body; and if my said brother Humphry 
die without heirs male of his bodv, then that the said 
Castles, Lordships, &c. do remain to my heirs. Kings of 
England, and be annexed to the Crown of England for 
evermore. And if it so happen that my said feoffees die 
all save three, two, or one, then I will and pray that the 
three, two, or one, that they of all the Castles, Lordships, 

' Duke of Bedford, Earl of Kendal, and K. G. third son of 
Henry IV. ob. 1435, s. p. 

* Fourth and youngest son of Henry IV. Duke of Gloucester, 
and Earl of Pembroke, K. G. Said to have been murdered Feb. 
/^. jBBB; ob. s.p. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 21 

8cc. before expressed, do enreoff two of the twelve follow- 
ing persons: Robert Bishop of Salisbury * ; John Bishop 
of Coventry and Litchfield*; Edward Courtney, Gilbert 
Talbot, John Nevill, Knighu; Robert Lord Willoughby; 
Edward Holland, Gilbert Umfraville, John Rodenhall, and 
Robert Babthorpe, Knights ; Roger Flore, and John Wil- 
cotes, Esquires. 

In witness hereof, I have hereto set my great seal, and 
my seal that I use in the government of my heritage of 
Lancaster^ and I have subscribed my own hand, and do 
close them under my privy seal, the 2)st day of July, in the 
year of our Lord 1417, and of my reign the fifth. This is 
my full will, God knoweth *. ^ .^ |> 



HENRY VL 

In the name, &c. I, Henry, by the grace of God King 
of England and of France, and Lord of Ireland, after the 
Conquest of England the Sixth', have caused my Will to 
be written in manner that followeth. Forasmuch as I have 
enfeoffed before this time John Cardinal and Archbishop 
of York*; John Archbishop of Canterbury*; Robert, 
Bishop of London^; William Bishop of Lincoln^ ; William 
Bishop of Salisbury'; and Thomas Bishop of Bath and 
Wells*; John Carpenter, Clerk of the Church of Worces- 



* Robert Hallam, Cardinal. He died in that year, 

* John Ketterick. 

* Royal Wills, p. 236. 

» Henry VI. son of Henry V. was born at Windsor Dec. 6, 
1421 ; ascended the throne August 31, 1422; and was murdered 
in the Tower June 20, 1471) above twenty-threa years after the 
date of his Will. His son, the Prince of Wales, having been killed 
a few weeks before, the line of Lancaster terminated with this 
Monarch. 

* John Kemp, translated to Canterbury in 1452. 

* John Stafford, Cardinal. 

* Robert Gilbert, 1435—1449. ' William Alnwick. 

* William Atscoth. ^ Tliomas Beckington. 



22 TESTAMENTS VETUSTA. 

ter, now Bishop of the same ' ; Adam Molyns, CSerk, now 

Bishop of Chichester*; Walter Lyert, Clerk, now Bishop 

of Norwich'; John Langton, Clerk, late Bishop of St. 

David's, and now to God passed*; John Dulaber, Clerk, 

now Bishop of St. David ; William Earl of Suflblk, now 

Marquess of Suffolk*; Henry Earl of JNorthumberland; 

John Viscount Beaumont; Walter Lord Hungerford; 

Ralf Lord Cromwell ; Ralf Lord Sudley ; John Beauchamp, 

Knight, now Lord Beauchamp of Poyke; and James 

Fienes, Esq. now Lord Say ; John Somerset, Henry Sever, 

Richard Andrew, Walter Sherington, Clerks; Edward 

Hungerford, and Edward Hull, Knights; John Sainhoe, 

now to God passed, John Hampton, John Norres^ WiU 

liam Tresham, John Vampage, and Richard Aldred, now 

to God passed. Esquires, in divers Castles, Lordships, &c. 

parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, as it is contained in let* 

ters parent, the first dated 29th November, the 22d year of 

my reign®; the second dated the 7th of July, the same 

year; the third dated 23d February, the 23d year of my 

reign^; the fourth dated 29th June, the same year; which 

Castles, 8cc. be of the yearly value of (£S,395. 1 U» 7d, when 

discharged of the fees and annuities with which they be 

now charged *. 

* John Carpenter became Bishop of Worcester in 1443. 

* Adam Molins became Bishop of Chichester in 1445. 

* Walter Lyert, called in Heylyn's Help to English History, ed. 
1675 and 1773; and also in Beatson's Political Index, Walter 
Hart, He was Provost of Oriel College, and Bishop of Norwich 
from 1445 to 1472. 

* John Langton was Bishop of St. David's from 1446 to 1447» 
hence it is evident he must have died before March 1447> the date 
of Henry the Sixth's Will. He was succeeded by John Dutcher. 

s William de la Pole succeeded his nephew Michael de la Pole 
as Earl of Suffolk in 1415; created Marquess of Suffolk 23 
Henry VL ; and Duke of Suffolk June 2d, 26 Henry VI. ; K. G. 
Beheaded on board a boat in Dover Roads May 1448. Dugdale, 
vol. ii. p. 189. Vide a very minute and interesting account of the 
death of this nobleman in the Paston Letters, vol. i. 

* 1443. » 1445. 

' Here follows his foundation of <' the College Royal of Our Lady 



TESTAMENTS VETUSTA. 2S 

If it fortane that all my said feoffees die excepting 
three, or two, or one, I will and pray the said survivors 
do enfeoff fourteen persons, whose names be hereafter 
written, in the said Castles, Lordships^ &c.: William 
Bishop of Winchester^; Reginald Bishop of St. Asaph*; 
Thomas Earl of Devon; Richard Earl of Salisbury ; Henry 
Earl of Northumberland ; John Earl of Shrewsbury ; Tho- 
mas Lord Clifford ; Lionel Lord Welles ; Mr. John Chad- 
worth, Provost of my said College of Cambridge; William 
Wesbury, Provost of my said College of Eton ; Mr. Wil- 
liam Say ; Mr. Andrew Holts; Sir Robert Roose, Knight; 
and Sir Thomas Stanley, Knight. 

Whereas I have ordained -by my letters patent my well- 
beloved William Tresham, Esq. Chancellor, and Nicholas 
Willoughby, General Receiver and Attorney of and for all 
the Castles, Lordships, Manors, 8cc. ; and I have also ap- 
pointed a seal to be used in that behalf, I will that my said 
feoffees secure the said William and Nicholas in the said 
offices for their lives. Furthermore, 1, considering the great 
discretion of the said worshipful Father in God, William, 
now Bishop of Winchester, his high trust and fervent zeal, 
will, not only that he be surveyor, but also executor and 
director of my said Will; and that hfi also be consulted on 
all occasions, and if any act be done without his consent 
it is to be void. In case any discord or differetice of 
opinion occur between any of my said feoffees, the said 
Bishop of Winchester is to be umpire thereof, whose deci- 
sion is to be final. If the said Bishop of Winchester pass 
unto God, I being alive, I will that the power here given 
unto him return again wholly to me; but if the said Bishop 
of Winchester be called out of this mortal life, we not liv- 
ing, and if my said will be not fully accomplished, I will 
that he appoint the most discreet, faithful, and true person, 
a Lord spiritual and temporal, to execute the said trust. 
In witness hereof, I have set hereto my great seal, and 



of Eton beside Windsor, and the other called the College Royal of 
Our Lady and St. Nicholas of Cambridge.** 

* William de Waynfleet. * Reginald Peacock. 

c4 



^4 TESTAHMV7A VSTUOTA. 

the seal of mj said Pacbyi -QQd ip j seitl appointed $nd 
^s«igD6d by roe for the saici Castles, Lordships, &c. put 
i^tp. the said feoffiPient ; > a»d aUo as well as the sigoei I use 
in my owu goyernauce fot the said Ducbyi ai the siguet of 
niiue arms. Aod^ I fajare signed .tfae^e present letters, iur 
Rented aud tripartite, the iStb of March, anno Domini 
X447 »,. an/d of my reiga the 86th*. 



ELIZABETH, 
WIDOW OF Kino edward iv.« 

In the name, &c. the 10th day of April, the year of our 
Lord God 1492, I, Elizabeth, by the grace of God Queen 
of England, late wife to the most victorious Prince of 
blessed memory Edward the Fourth ', being, 8lc. 



» 1447-8- 

* Royri Wills, p. 291. 

< it is almost certain that Edward IV. left a WiU, but it has 
sever been discovered. The Editors 6f the Royal '^^^Ils rationally 
conjecture that it was destroyed during the usurpation of hii 
brother Richard JIL 

> She was widow of Sir Edward Grey, of Groby, Knt* and 
daughter of Sir Richard Woodvile, Knt. who was created by Ed- 
ward IV. Earl Rivers, Lord Treasurer, Lord Constable, and a 
Knight of the Garter : she married King Edward, May 1, 1464. By 
her first husband she had two sons^ Sir Thomas and Sir Richard 
Grey; the latter was beheaded at Pomfret 1 Richard III. but the for- 
mer rose rapidly into favour during the reign of his father-in-law, for 
in 1471 he was created £arl of Huntingdon, and on the 18th of April, 
1475, the King advanced him to the dignity of Marquess of Dorset ; 
he died 17 Henry VII. leaving issue. Edward IV. by the said Eliza- 
beth, had three sons, Edward V. and Richard Duke of York, who 
were both murdered in the Tower by their uncle Richard III. ; and 
George Duke of Bedford, who died young. Of his daughters, Eli- 
zabeth, the eldest, became sole heiress to the Crown, and married 
Henry VII. Cicely, the next daughter^ married, first, John Lord 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 25 

Iteoii I bequeath my body to be buried with the body of 
my Lord at Windsor, according to the will of my said 
Lord and mine, without '' pom pes entreing or costlie ex- 
pensis done thereabought." Item, whereas I have no 
worldly goods to do the Queene's Grace, my dearest 
daughter^ a pleasure with, neither to reward any of my 
children according to my heart and mind, I beseech Al- 
mighty God to bless her Grace, with all her noble issue ; 
and, with as good heart and mind aa is to me possible, I 
give her Grace my blessing, and all the aforesaid my chiU 
dren. Item, I will that such small stuff and goods that I 
have be disposed truly in the contentation of my debts^ 
and for the health of my soul, as far as they will extend. 
Item, that if any of my blood will any of my said stuff 
or goods to me pertaining, I will that they have the 
preferment before any other. And of this my present tes- 
tament I make and ordain mine executors, that is to say, 
John Ingilby, Prior of the Charter-house of Thene ; Wil- 
liam Sutton and Thomas Brent, Doctors ; and 1 beseech 
my said dearest daughter, the Queen's Grace, and my son 
Thomas Marquess of Dorset, to put their good wills and 
help for the performance of this my testament. In witness 
whereof, to tbis my present testament I have set my seal ; 

Wells, and, secondly, .... Kyme, of Lincolnshire, but left no sur- 
viving issue ; Bridget, Mary, and Margaret, died young and un- 
married ; Ann, married Thomas Duke of Norfolk^ and died 
8. p. 6. ; Catherine was the wife of William Courtenay, Earl of 
Devonshire, and lefl issue, but on the death of her grandson Ed- 
ward Marquess of Exeter her issue became extinct. During 
the reign of her son in law Henry VII. Queen Elizabeth was 
treated with considerable severity; in 1486 he seized on all her pos- 
sessions^ and put her into close confinement in the Nunnery of 
Bermondsey, where she continued until her death. The simple and 
pathetic manner in which this unhappy woman laments her being 
destitute of property to bequeath her children, and her affecting 
directions, that if either of her relations wish to possess any thing 
that belonged to her, they should have the preference, cannot be 
read without unfeigned sympathy, and exhibit in a forcible man- 
ner the cruel rigour with which her son-in-law had treated her. 



26 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

these witnesses, John Abbot of the Monastery of Saint 
Saviour of Bermondesley, and Benedict Cuni Doctor of 
Pbysick. Given the day and year aforesaid. 



HENRY VIL 

In the name, &c« We, Henry, by the grace of God King 
of England and of France, and Lord of Ireland, of this 
name the seventh, at our manor of Richmond, the last 
day of March, 15099 ^^^ of out reign the 24th, make this 
our last Will and Testament. Forasmuch as that the body 
of the glorious King and Confessor Saint Edward, and 
divers others of our progenitors, and specially the body of our 
grand*dame of right noble memory Queen Katherine, wife 
to King Henry the Fifth', and daughter to King Charles of 
France, be interred within our Monastery of Westminster, 
and that we propose shortly to translate thither the body 
and reliqnes of our uncle of blessed memory King Henry 
the Sixth % we will, in consideration thereof, that, whether 



' Catherine, the widow of King Hemy V. and daughter of 
Charles y I. King of France, married, secondly, Owen Tudor, by 
whom she had Edmund Earl of Richmond ; who, by marrying 
IVfargaret, daughter and heiress of John Beaufort, Earl of Somer- 
set, had Henry VIL Through his mother Henry derived what he 
considered a claim to the Crown through the House of Lancaster ; 
for the father of the said John Beaufort was son of John of Gaunt 
by Catharine Swinford ; but not only was he bom before marriage, 
but even during the life time of Constance of Castile, his father's 
second wife ; the act of Parliament 20 Richard 11. which legiti- 
matized the issue of the Duke of Lancaster by Catherine Swinford, 
specially excepted their deriving thereby any right to the throne ; 
hence perhaps nothing could be more absurd than Henry*s claim 
to the Crown by descent. His other pretensions will be alluded 
to in a subsequent note. 

• Henry's relationship to Henry VI. was this : Catherine of 
France, the mother of that monarch by her second marriage, had 
Edmund Earl of Richmond, as has been just remarked, conse- 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 27 

we die within oar realm or not, our body be buried within 
the same monastery; that is to say, in the chapel where 
our said grand-dame lies buried, the which chapel we have 
begun to build of new in the honour of our blessed Lady* 
We will that our tomb be in the midst of the same chapel, 
before the high altar, at such distance from the same as is 
ordered in the plan made for the same chapel, and signed 
with our hand, in which place we will that there be made 
a tomb of stone called ''Touche,'' sufficiently large both 
for our dearest late wife the Queen ' and ourself, and that 
her body be removed from the place where it is now buried, 
and laid with our body in the said tomb, if it be not done 
by ouriself in our days. We will that our executors and 
supervisors, and executors of our testament, have a special 
respect, in our funeral, to the laud and praising of God, 
the health of our soul, and ** somewhat to our dignity royal, 
avoiding always damnable pomp and outrageous super- 
fluities/' — ** And we will also, if any person, of what degree 
soever he be, shew by way of complaint to our executors 
any wrong to have been done to him by us, our command* 
menty occasion, or mean, or that we held any goods or 
lands which of right ought to appertain unto him, that 
every such complaint be speedily, tenderly, and effectually 
heard, and the matter duly and indifferently examined by 
the most reverend Father in God the Archbishop of Can« 
terbury that now is, or that hereafter for the time shall be, 
the Reverend Fathers in God'Richard Bishop of Winches- 
ter, the Bishops of London and Rochester, that now be, 
or hereafter for the time shall be ; Thomas £arl of Surrey, 
our Treasurer General ; George Earl of Shrewsbury, Steward 
of our House; Sir Charles Somerset, Lord Herbert our 
Chamberlain, the Chief Justices of our Bench and Common 
Place that now be, or that at the time of cur decease shall 



quently Henry VI. and the said Edmund were half brothers, and 
Henry VIL might therefore with some propriety call the former 
his uncle, though he was so of the half blood only. 

» Elizabeth of York, eldest daughter, and ultimately sole heiress 
of King Edward IV. She died in child-bed Feb. 11 , 1503. 



28 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

be ; Mister John YoDg, Master of the Rolls of our Chan- 
cery; Sir Thomas Lovell, Knt. Treasurer of our House; 
Msdster Thomas Rothall, our Secretary ; Sir Richard Em- 
son, Knt. our Chancellor of our Duchy of Lancaster, 
Edmund Dudley, Esq. our Attorney ; that at the time of 
our decease shall be our Confessor; the Provincial of the 
Freres Observants; and Maister William at Warer, Dean 
of our Chapel ; or any six of them at the least, and three 
of our executors. And in case, by such examination, it 
can.be found that the complaint be made of a grounded 
cause in conscience^ other than matter done by the course 
and order of our laws^ or that our said executors, by their 
wisdoms and discretions shall think that in conscience our 
soul ought to stand charged with the said matter and com- 
plaint, we will then that, as the case shall require, he and 
they be restored and recompensed by our said executors, 
out of such ready money, 8cc. And to the intent that no 
such person, nor any other whereunto we shall after our 
decease stand indebted, have cause of ignorance of this 
our will and mind, we will that our executors, within three 
months next and immediately following our decease at the 
farthest, cause open proclamations to be made in every 
Shire-town, and three or four other of the best Burghes 
and market-towns of every Shire within this our Realm, 
that if any man can for any cause reasonable claim any 
debt of us, or shew that we have wronged him in any man- 
ner of wise, that might or should charge our conscience as 
before is said, that he resort to our said executors, and the 
said examiners, in such place as after their discretions 
shall be appointed, and then and there to be readily heard 
and answered, as reason and conscience shall in that 

part require*," 

* Here follow numerous charitable bequests. — The whole of 
this clause has been introduced as being evidence that Henry at 
the time he made his will roust have been visited with compunc- 
tious feelings for his rapacity and extortion; and whilst, as Mr. 
Astle, in his admirable preface to the Will of that monarch, re- 
marks, << that the examiners are restrained to matters which they 
'^ in their conscience should think his soul should stand charged 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. Sg 

And whereas, by authority of our Parliament held at 
Westminster the 20th of February, the 7th year * of our 
reign, it is among other things enacted that John, then 
Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Chancellor of 
England, deceased*; Thomas, then Archbishop of York, 

<< with, and all such things are exempted as had been done by 
« course and order of law, which had been the common mode of his 
'< oppressions, and that his instruments, Empson and Dudley, are 
"in the number of these examiners;** still, it must not be forgotten, 
that as this direction of the dying monarch (for Henry died of a 
consumption in little more than three weeks afler the date of his 
Will ) could only originate in remorse, and the desire to make the 
best restitution in his power to those who had suffered from his 
conduct, it ought to be considered as a redeeming fact in estimat- 
ing his character. Had he not *' excepted what had been done by 
due course of law,** he would have opened a door to complaints of 
every description ; all who had suffered by the numerous attain- 
ders and forfeitures which occurred in his reign might equally have 
been deemed persons " who had wrong done to him by us, our 
commandment or means,'* and whose goods or lands he "held 
which of right ought to appertain unto him.*' It is true that Emp- 
son and Dudley are appointed two of the examiners, but they ar^ 
only two out of seventeen, and the King particularly orders that 
the Court of Examiners shall never consist of less than nine persons, 
of whom three are to be his executors; moreover Dudley and 
Empson were also named amongst his executors, and however 
justly subsequent ages may have condemned them, this circum- 
stance proves in some degree that Henry thought highly of them, 
and allows the inference that in associating them with the most dis- 
tinguished men of the times in that delicate commission, he had no 
view of excluding from its attention those transactions in which 
Dudley and Empson were the chief actors. These notorious indi- 
viduals are so well known that it is. not necessary to say any thing 
more about them, than that they paid the forfeit of their crimes 
very early in the following reign ; and the proclamation which 
Hume describes as having been issued soon after the accession of 
Henry VIII. " to encourage complaints,** was in all probability that 
which is directed in the Will of his father, and which that historian 
considers hastened, if not produced, the fate of these wretches.—^ 
Vide vol. iii. p. 411. 

» 149«. • John Morton. 



so TE8TAMENTA VBTU8TA. 

deceased ■ ; Jasper, then Duke of Bedfofd, deceased ; Piers, 
then Bishop of Winchester, deceased * ; John, then Bishop 
of Eljy deceased >; Richard, then Bishop of Exon, now 
Bishop of Winchester*; Edmund, then Bishop of Roches- 
ter, now Bishop of Saram*; Thomas Earl of Arundel; 
John Earl of Oxford ; George Earl of Shrewsbury ; Tho- 
mas Earl of Surrey; John, then Viscount Welles, de- 
ceased ; John, then Lord Dinham, Treasurer of England, 
Knight, deceased; Giles Lord Daubeny, Knight; William 
Husee, Knight, deceased; Oliver King, Clerk, deceased'; 
John Cheney, Knight, deceased ; Gilbert Talbot, Knight ; 
Thomas Montgomery, Knight, deceased; Reginald Bray, 
Knight, deceased ; John Savage, Knight, deceased ; James 
Blount, Knight, deceased ; Richard Guldeford, Knight, de- 
ceased; Thomas Lovell, Knight, deceased; and John Risley, 
Knt. ; should hold and enjoy the Lordships, &c. And it was 
afterwards enacted, by another Parliament held at West- 
minster the ^th day of January, in the igth year of our 
reign ', that William, now Archbishop of Canterbury, Pri- 
mate and Chancellor of England*; Thomas Archbishop 
of York, deceased*; Edward Duke of .Buckingham; 
Richard, now Bishop of Winchester *' ; William Bishop of 
Durham, deceased"; Edmond Bishop of Salisbury**; 
Geoffrey Bishop of Chester''; John Abbot of Westmin- 
ster; Charles Lord Herbert; John Fyneux, Knight; Tho- 
mas Trowik, Knight^ deceased ; Geoffrey Simeon, Clerk, de- 



* Thomas Rotheram. * Peter Courtenay. 

* John Alcock. < Richard Fox. 
' Edmund Audley. 

^ Query? If not Bishop of Exeter from 1492 to 1495; and of 
Bath and Wells from 1495 to 1505. 

' 1504. * William Warfaam. • Thomas Savage. 

«• Richard Fox. '* William Sevior. 

>* Edmund Audley. 
" " GeoffireyBlyth, Bishop of Lichfield 1503--1534. Chester was 
erected into a bishoprick by Henry YIII. anno 1541, but as it was 
formerly in the diocese of Lichfield, and being a more important 
place, the Bishops of Lichfield were often called Bishops of 
Chester. 



TE8TAMENTA VSTUSTA; 31 

ceased ; WilKam Bawnsi Clerk, deceased ; Thomas Row- 
thale. Clerk ; Edward RoyDings, Knight ; Henry Vernon^ 
Knight; John Mordaunt, deceased; James Hobart, Richard 
Emson, Humphry Conyngesby, and John Kingsmele, 
Serjeants at Law, should stand seised, &c. '^ And whereas 
our uncle of blessed memory, King Henry the Sixth, has, 
to the increase of cunning and doctrine in the laws of God, 
to the edification of our faith, and the weale of Christian 
souls, founded a famous College in our University of Cam- 
bridge, called the New College, Sec. which church resteth 
as yet unperfected and unfinished, little or nothing wrought 
or done thereupon since the decease of our said uncle, 
saving that now of late, to the honor of God, the weale of 
our soul, and for the singular trust that we have to the 
prayers of our said uncle, for the great holiness of life and 
virtue that he was of in earth, we have at our proper cost 
caused workmen in a good number to work upon the ad- 
vancement of the building of the same Church, we, 8cc. Also 
to the finishing the new Church of the Monastery of St. 
Peter of Westminster, wherein we received our holy coro- 
nation and inunction, d marks. Also, we give and be- 
queath to the altar within the grate of our tomb our great 
piece of the Holy Cross, which, by the high provision of 
our Lord God, was conveyed, brought, and delivered to us 
from the Isle of Cyo ', in Greece, set. in gold and garnished 
with pearls and precious stones; and also the precious 
relic of one of the legs of St. George set in silver, parcel 
gilt, which came to the hands of our brother and cousin 
Lewis of France the time that he won and recovered the 
city of Milan, and given and sent to us by our cousin 
the Cardinal of Amboys, Legate in France." ''Also to 
the same altar, if it be not done by ourselves in our life,, 
one Mass-book, hand written, &c.* Also we will that our 
executors cause to be made an image of a king represent- 

^ Scio. 

* The curious manner of describing a MS. from a printed book, 
within the century after printing was invented, and about thirty- 
eight years after Caxton introduced it into England, has been 
thought well worth introducing. 



32 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

ing our own person, the same to be of timber, covered and 
wrought with plate of fine gold, in manner of an armed 
man, and upon the same armour a coat-armour of oar arms 
of England and France enamelled, with a sword and spurs 
accordingly; and the said image to kneel upon a table of 
silver and gilt, and holding betwixt his hands the crown 
which it pleased God to give us with the victor; of our 
enemy at our first field * : the which image and crown we 
bequeath to Almighty God, our blessed Lady, &c. to be 
placed upon and in the midst of the crest of the shrine of 
St. Edward King, in such place as our executors shall 
think most convenient and honorable. And we will that 
our said image be above the knee of the height of 
three foot ten, that the head and half the breast may 
clearly appear above and over the said crown; and that 

^. * 

■ Henry the Seventti's pretensions to the Crown by descent have 
been noticed ; these he must have been conscious did not afford 
him any rational claim, and neither his pride nor his interest would 
allow him to rest it on the right of his wife Elizabeth, the un- 
doubted heiress to the throne, for as he mounted it before his mar- 
riage he would thereby have tacitly confessed that he had in the 
first instance usurped it. Many circumstances combine to per- 
suade us that he would gladly have grounded his claim on the right 
qf conquest had he not been aware that his asserting it would have 
been so offensive to his new subjects as to have been attended with 
considerable danger. But if any evidence would establish what 
were his real feelings with respect to his right to the throne, inde- , 
pendent of what he derived from his marriage, this clause in his 
Will must be considered as doing so. Considerations of self- 
interest did not then restrain him ; for, if he only was King de 
facto f his son Would unquestionably be so dejure in right of his mo- 
ther ; and we may consequently infer, that as he was prevented from 
manifesting his real sentiments on the subject during his life time, he 
was determined to leave a solemn posthumous proof that, in his 
opinion, he owed the Crown to conquest alone. Notliing can be 
more strongly expressed : '< holding betwixt his hands the Crotvn 
which it pleased God to give us toith the victory of our enemi^ at 
our first Jield'" — not one syllabic being mentioned either of his 
claim jwre uxorisy or, which we now proudly feel would have been 
a superior title to either —the consent of the Nation. 



TESTAM£NTA VETUSTA. S3' 

Upon both sides of the said table be a convenient broad 
border, and in the same be graven and written with large 
letters black enamelled these words, rex henricus skp-. 
TLMU8. Also, we bequeath to God and St. Peter, and to 
the Abbot, Prior, and Convent of our Monastery of West- 
minster, for a perpetual memory there to remain while the 
the world shall endure, the whole suit of vestments and 
coopies of cloth of gold tissue, wrought with our badges of 
red roses and portcullises, the which we of late caused to 
be made at our proper costs and charges, bought and pro- 
vided at Florence in Italy. '' Item. Forasmuch as we have 
often, and many times to our inward regret and displea- 
sure,, seen at our Jen.' in divers and many Churches of our 
Realme, the Holy Sacrament of the Altar kept in full sim-^ 
pie and inhonest pixes*, specially pixes of copper and tim** 
her, we have appointed and commanded the Treasurer of 
our Chamber, and Master of our Jewel-house, to cause to 
be made forthwith pixes of silver and gilt in a great num- 
ber, for the keeping of the Holy Sacrament of the Altar 
after the fashion of a pixe that we have caused to be deli- 
vered to them, every of the said pixes to be of the value of 
four pounds, garnished with our arms and red roses and 
portcullises crowned, of the which pixes we will, that to 
the laud and service of God, the honor of the Holy Sacra- 
ment of the Altar, the weale of our soule, and for a perpe- 
tual memory of tis, every house of the four orders of Freres^ 
and in likewise every parish Church within this our Realm, 
not having a pixe, nor none other honest vessel of silver 
and gilt, nor of silver ungilted, for the keeping of the said 
Holy Sacrament, have, of our gift in our life, one of thei 
said pixes, as soon and speedily as goodly may be done* 
And if this be not performed in part, or in all, in our life, 
we then will, that that shall rest not performed in our life 
be performed by our executors within one year at the far- 
thest next after our decease.'' And whereas it is cove- 



^ Query. 

* A pix is a little chest or box in which the consecrated host is 
kept in Catholic Churches. 

D 



34 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

nanted betwixt us on the one part, and the most saci^d 
Prince Maximilian Elect Emperor, as well for himself and 
in his own name, and as then King of the Romans, as also 
as grandfather, tutor, and governor of the person, lands, and 
countries of the high and mighty Prince Charles, Prince of 
Spain, Arch-duke of Austria, Duke of Bourgoyne, Bra* 
bant, &c. and Count of Flanders, &c. his nephew, and the 
same Charles Prince of Spain, by the assent of his said tu« 
tor and the right noble Princess the Lady Margaret, 
Duchess of Savoy, aunt to the said Prince, on the other 
part, for marriage, by God's grace, to be solemnized be* 
twixt the said Prince of Spain and our most dear daughter 
the Lady Mary, at such time as the said Priuce of Spain 
shall be of such full age as the laws of the Church require, 
according unto espousals by our means, and at '' our right 
great cost, have been solemnly and openly contracted be- 
twixt the said Prince of Castile, by his Proctor sufficiently 
constituted on the one part, and our said daughter in her 
person on the other part, in our manor of Richmond the 
• •• day of December, in the 23d year of our reign *, ourself 
in our person, and the ambassadors of the said Prince of 
Castile, with many other most honourable lords spiritual 
and temporal, ladies, and other nobles, of our king* 
dom, iu a great number then being present, with divers 
and many most solemn and honourable justs, tourneys, 
feasts, and other triumphs and ceremonies, to such an act 
convenient and requisite, ensuing the said contract of es- 
pousals, and by a long space of time continuing and en- 
during." In case it so happen, that by the death of the 
said Prince of Castile, or from any other cause, the said 
marriage should be dissolved, then that she be ruled in her 
said marriage by the advise and consent of our said son the 
Prince, his Council and our said Executors, and so that 
she be married to some noble Prince out of this our realm*. 



* .Anno 1507* 

* The marriage of Lady Mary, the second daughter of Henry 
VII. with Charles Prince of Castile did not take effect ; she mar- 
riedyfirBt, Lewis XII. King of France, and afterwards Charles Duke 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 35 

'And Yor the perfect execution of this oar last will, we 
make our dearest, land most entirely beloved mother, Mar- 
garet Countess of Richmond ; the most Reverend Father 
in God Christopher Archbishop of York \ ; the Reverend 
Fathers in God Richard Bishop of Winchester*; Richard, 
Bishop of London ' ; Edmund Bishop of Sarum * ; Wil« 
Ham, Bishop of Lincoln '; John Bishop of Rochester'; 
our right trusty and well-beloved cousins Thomas Earl of 
Arundel; and Thomas Earl of Surrey, our Treasurer Ge- 
neral; our right trusty and well-beloved Councillots, Sir 
Charles Somerset, Knight ; Lord Herbert, our Chamber 
Iain; Sir John Fyneux, Knight, Chief Justice of our 
Bench; Sir Robert Rede, Knight, Chief Justice of our 
Common Place; Maister John Yong, Master of the Rolls 
of our Chancery ; Sir Thomas Lovell, Knight, Treasurer 
of our Household; Maister Thomas Rowthall, our Secre- 
taiy; Sir Richard Emson, Knight, Chancellor of our 
Duchy of Lancaster ; Sir John Cutte, Knight, our Under 
Treasurer General ; and Edmund Dudley, Esquire^ our ex- 
ecutors ; to each of whom we bequeath one hundred 
pounds. 

And we ordain and appoint the said Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, for the time being, supervisor of this our last will 
and testament. 

In testimony of all which premises, we have commanded 
tfs well our Privy Seal as our Signet, remaining in the keep- 



of Brandon, upon which alliance the following distiches were 
made : 

To Mary. 

Cloath of gold, do not despise 
To match thyself to cloath of frise. 
To Charles. x 

Cloath of frise, be not too bold, 
Though thou art match to cloath of gold. 

' Christopher Bambridge. ' Richard Fox. 

' Richard Fitz James. * Edmund Audley. 

^ William Atwater. * John Fisher, the celebrated Cardinal. 

o 2 



30 TESTAMESTA VETUSTA. 

ing of bur Secretary, and our Privy Signet of the Egvell ', 
remaining in our own keeping, as also our Great Seal to be 
put to these said presents. Dated at Canterbury the xth 
day of April, the xxiiii year of our reign *. 



KATHERINE OF ARRAGON*. 

In the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost, Amen. I, Katharine, &c. supplicate and desire 
King Henry the VHI. my good Lord, that it please him of 
his grace, and in alms, and for the service of God, to let 
me have the goods which I do hold, as' well in gold and 
silver as other things, and also the same that is due to me 
in money for the time passed, to the intent that I m^y pay 
my debts and recompense my servants for the good service 
they have done unto roe, and the same I desire as effec- 
tuously as 1 may, for the necessity wherein I am ready to 
die and to yield my soul unto God. 

First, I supplicate that my body be buried in a Convent 
of Observant Friars. Item, that for iny soul may be said 
c masses. Item, that some personage go to our Lady of 

' Query, 

" 1504. King Henry VII. died of a consumption at Richmond 
April 9] St, 1509. 

* Katherine, daughter of Ferdinand King of Spain. She was 
bom about the year 1463, and on the 14th of November 1501, 
married Arthur Prince of Wales, eldest son of King Henry VII. 
then just fifteen years of age, and who died on the 2d of April 
1502, 8. p. ; she afterwards married her brother-in-law, Henry, who 
was created Prince of Wales 18th February 1503, and succeeded 
to the throne Slst April 1509, as King Henry VIII. On tlie 24th 
of June in the same year they were crowned at Westminster, and 
their only issue Mary, who is mentioned in her mother's will, was 
born at Greenwich in February 1518, and succeeded her half-bro- 
ther King Edward VI. as Queen of England 6th July 1553. Queen 
Katherine's unfoiritunate history is too well known, and too gene- 
rally lamented, to require either repetition or comment. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 3? 

.Walsingham, in pilgrimage^ and in going by the way dole 
XX nobles. Item, I appoint to Mistress Darell xx /. for 
her marriage. Item, I ordain that the collar of gold which 
I brought out of Spain be to my daughter. I ordaiii to 
Mistress Blanche x /.sterling. Item, I ordain to Mistress 
Margery, and to Mistress Whiller, to each of them x /. 
sterling. Item, I ordain to Mistress Mary, my physician's 
wife, and to Mistress Isabel, daughter of Mistress Mar- 
gery, to each of them xl /. sterling. Item, I ordain to my 
physician the year's coming wages. Item, I ordain to 
Francisco Philippe all that I owe unto him, and besides 
that xl7. sterling. Item, I ordain to Mr. John, mine apo- 
thecary, his wages for the year coming, and besides that 
all that is due unto him. Item, I ordain that Mr. Whiller 
be paid of expence about the making of my gown, and be- 
sides that of XX /. sterling. Item, I give to Philip, to An- 
thony, and to Bastian, to every of them xxi. sterling* 
Item, I ordain to the little maidens xl. to every of 
them. Item, I ordain that my goldsmith be paid of his 
wages for the year coming, and besides all that is due to 
him hitherto. Item, I ordain that my launderer be paid 
of that is due unto her, and besides that of her wages for 
the year coming. Item, I ordain to the Sabell of Vergas 
XX /. sterling. Item, to my ghostly father his wages for 
the year coming. Item, it may please the King my good 
Lord, that the house ornaments of the church to be made 
of my gowns, which he holdeth, for to serve the convent 
thereat I shall be buried. And the furs of the same I give 
for my daughter *. 



HENRY VIII. 

In the name of God, and of the glorious and blessed 
Virgin our Lady Saint Mary, and all the Holy Company 
of Heaven. We Henry, by the grace of God, King of 
England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and 
on earth, immediately under God, the supreme head of the 

* Cottonian MSS. Titus, C vii. f. 44. It is without date. 



98 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Church of England and Ireland^ of that name the eighty 
calling to mind, 8cc. And as for nay hody, were it not for 
the crown and dignity which God bath called us to, and 
that we would not be an infringer of worldly policies and 
customs when they be not contrary to God's laws, we 
would be content to have it buried in any place accustomed 
to Christian folks, were it never bo vile, for it is but ashes, 
and to ashes it shall return again ; nevertheless, because we 
would be loath, in the reputation of the people, to do injury 
to the dignity which we are unworthily called unto, we ar^ 
content, and by these presents, our last will and testament, 
ordain that it be buried in the quire of our College of Wind«- 
sor, midway between the halls and the high altar, and an 
honorable tomb for our bones to rest in be made (if it be 
not done by us in our life time), in which we will also that 
the bones of our true and loving wife Queen Jane * be put 
also. Also, we will that the tombs and altars of King Henry 
the Sixth, and of King Edward the Fourth, our great uncle 
and grandfather, be made more princely, at our charges*. 
Also, I will '* that the service of Placebo, add Dirige, 
with a sermon and mass on the morrow, devoutly to be 
done, and that all divine service accustomed for dead folks 
to be celebrated for us in the next proper place where it 
shall fortune us to depart this transitory life." Also 
yearly, for ever> to 13 poor men, which shall be called 
Poor Knights, to every of them \2d. by day, and once 
in the year, yearly for ever, a long gown of white cloth, 
with the garter upon the breast embroidered with a shield 
and cross of Saini George within the garter, and a mantle 
of red cloth, and to such a one of th^ thirteen poor 
knights, as shall be appointed governor £3. 6$. Sd. yearly, 
over and above the said 12c2. per day. And as for and 
concerning the Qrder and disposition of the Imperial Crown 
of these Realms of England and Ireland, with our title of 
France, and all dignities, honors, 8cc. for the sure esta- 



* Jane Seymour, his third wife, who died in child-birth Oct. 

I^tli, 1537- 
' Here follow some directions about his funeral, and many cha- 
• ri table bequests. 



TESTAMfiNTA VETUSTA. 39 

Uishment of the succession of the same ; and also for a fiill 
declaralioDi limitatioDy &c. with which conditions our 
daughters Mary and Elizabeth shall severally hold, have, 
and enjoy, the said imperial crown, after our decease, and 
for default of issue of our son Prince Edward lawfully be* 
gotten, and his heirs ; and also for a full declaration, limi- 
tation, 8cc. to whom, and in which manner, form, and con- 
dition, the said imperial crown shall remain and come after 
our decease, and for default of issue and heirs of the several 
bodies of us, our said son Prince Edward, and of our said 
daughters Mary and Elizabeth, lawfully begotten, we, by 
these presents, make and declare our last will and testa* 
ment concerning the said imperial crown in manner and 
form following, that is to say : 

Immediately after our decease, our said son Prince Ed> 
ward shall have and enjoy the said imperial crown and 
realm of England and Ireland, our title of France, with all 
dignities, honors, pre-eminences, &c. Sic* to him and his 
heirs of his body lajvfully begotten ; and for default of such 
issue, we will that the said imperial crown, &c. after our 
two deceases, shall wholly remain and come to the heirs of 
our body lawfully begotten of the body of our entirely 
beloved wife Queen Katheriue* that now is, or of any other 
our lawful wife that we shall hereafter marry, for each of 
such issue and heirs ; and default of issue of our said son 
Prince Edward, the said imperial crown, &c. shall wholly 
remain and come to our said daughter Mary and the heirs 
of her body lawfully begotten, upon condition that our said 
daughter Mary, after our decease, shall not marry without 
the consent of the Privy Councillors and others appointed 
by us to our dearest son Prince Edward aforesaid, to be of 
council, or of the most part of them, or of the most part of 
such of them as shall be then alive, thereunto had before 
the said marriage in writing sealed with their seals ; all 
which conditions we declare, limit, appoint^ and will, by 
these presents, shall be knit and invested to the said estate 
of our daughter Mary in the said imperial crown, and all 
other the premises ; and if it fortune that our said daugfa« 

' Catharine Parr, his sixth and last wife. 



W TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

ter do die without lawful issue^ we will that the said inipe* 
rial crown and other premises shall wholly remain and come 
to our said daughter Elizabeth, and to the heirs of her body 
lawfully begotten, upon condition that she do not marry, 
&c. excepting with the consent of the same persons and 
in the same manner as just stated. If it so happen that 
our said daughter Elizabeth do die without lawful issue, 
and for default of issue of the bodies of us, of our said son 
Prince Edward, and our said daughters Mary and Eliza- 
beth, the said imperial crown shall wholly remain and 
come to the heirs of the body of the Lady Frances our 
niece, eldest daughter to our late sister the French Queen *, 

* Henry the Eighth had two sisters, Margaret and Mary ; Mar- 
garet, the eldest, married, first, Jame^ IV. of Scotland, whose son, 
by her, succeeded as James V. and was grandfather of James VI. 
of Scotland, and First of England. Mary^ the second sister, mar- 
ried, first, Louis XII. of France, who died s. p. ; and, secondly, 
Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk; by whom she had Henry 
Earl of Lincoln, who died vitiL patris unmarried, and two daugh- 
ters, Eleanor and Frances, on whose heirs. King Henry, in case of 
fiulure of the issue of Prince Edward, his son, and of his daughters 
Mary and Elizabeth, bequeathed the crown, entirely passing by 
the issue of Margaret his eldest sister. It is worthy of remark 
that the throne is left to the heirs of his said nieces Eleanor and 
Frances, but that they themselves are not included in the succes- 
sion. On the death of Edward VI. an attempt was made to place 
the crown on the head of the unfortunate Lady Jane Grey, the 
eldest daughter and coheir of the said Lady Frances, on the 
ground that Mary and Elizabeth, the daughters of Henry VIIL 
were illegitimate ; and as it is evident, that according to the will 
of that monarch, if they had died s. p. Lady Jane Grey would have 
been the next heir, the effect of their being considered illegitimate 
would equally have established Lady Jane's claim to the throne. 
Catherine, the sister of Lady Jane, on her unfortunate fate, of 
course succeeded to her claim to the crown, and on the death of 
Queen Elizabeth, Edward Lord Beauchamp, son and heir of the 
said Lady Catherine, by her second husband (she having been di- 
vorced from her first) Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford, would^ 
agreeably to the limitation of the crown by the will of Henry VIII. 
and which was authorized by act of parliament, have been the next 
in succession. The representative of the said Lord Beauchamp is 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 41 

lawfally begotten. And for default of such issue of the 
body of the said Lady Frances, we will that the said impe- 
rial crown and other the premises shall wholly remain and 
come to the heirs of the body of the Lady Eleanor our 
niece, second daughter to our said late sister the French 
Queen lawfully begotten ; and if it so happen that the said 
Lady Eleanor die without issue, then we will that the said 
imperial crown shall come to our next rightful heirs. Also, 
we will that if the said Lady Mary marry without the con* 
sent before described, the said imperial crown shall wholly 
remain to our said daughter Elizabeth, in the same manner 
as if the said Lady Mary were then dead without any lawful 
issue ; and if the said Lady Elizabeth do not marry ac- 
cording to the said conditions, then that the said imperial 
crown shall wholly remain to the heirs of the said Lady 
Frances, as if the said Lady Elizabeth were then dead with* 
out lawful issue. And we do constitute and appoint the per- 
sonages following to be our executors and performers of 
this our last will and testament: the Archbishop of Can'- 
terbury; the Lord Wryothesley, Chancellor of England ; the 
Lord St. John, Great Master of our House ; the Earl of 
Hertford, Great Chamberlain of England'; the Lord Rus- 
sel. Lord Privy Seal; the Viscount Lisle, High Admiral of 
England; the Bishop of Durham, Tonstal * ; Sir Anthony 
Browne, Knight, Master of our Horse; Sir Edward Mon- 
tague, Knight, Chief Judge of the Common Pleas; Justice 
Bromley'; Sir Edward North, Knight, Chancellor >of the 

her grace 'Anne-Elizabeth, the present Duchess of Buckingham 
and Chandos, she being daughter and sole heiress of James third 
.Duke of Chandos, son of Henry second Duke, by Mary, eldest 
daughter and^ coheir of Charles Earl of Aylesbury, son of Thomas 
Bruce, first Earl of Aylesbury, by Elizabeth sole daughter and 
heiress of Henry Lord Beauchamp, eldest son of William Duke of 
Somerset, son and heir of Edward Lord fieauchamp, the son of the 
said Lady Catharine Grey. 

* Brother of Lady Jane Seymour, Queen of England, uncle of 
King Edward VI. and afterwards Protector of England, K.'G. be- 
headed 22d Jan. 165^. ^ Cuthbert Tonstall. 

-^ Chief Justice of the King's Bench 1545—1547. 



42 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

Aagmentations ; Sir William Paget^ KDight^ our Ohief 
Secretary; Sir Anthony Denny, Sir' William Herbert, 
Knights, Chief Gentlemen of our Privy Chamber; Sir Ed- 
ward WottOQ, Knight; and Mr. Doctor Wotton, his bro^ 
ther ; all these we will be our Executors and Councillors 
of the Privy Council with our said son Edward, both of his 
private and public affairs. We will further, that Sir Ed- 
^londPeckham, our trusty servant and yet Cofferer of our 
House^ shall be Treasurer, and have the receipt and laying 
out of all such money as shall be defrayed by our execu* 
tors for the performance of this our last will. We will that 
our said executors do execute these points, iirst, the pay* 
ment of our debts, with redress of injuries, if any such can 
be duly proved, though to. us they be unknown, before any 
other part of this our will be performed, excepting our funeral 
and exequies* Further, according to the Laws of Almighty 
God, and for the fatherly love which we bear to our son 
Prince Edward, and to this our realm, we declare him, ac- 
cording to justice, equity, and conscience, to be our lawful 
heir, and do bequeath him the succession of our realms of 
England and Ireland, with our title of France, and all our 
doipinions both on this side the seas and beyond, a conve- 
ni^t portion from our will and testament to be reserved. 
Al«o, we give unto him all our plate, stuff of household, ar- 
tillery, ordnance, ammunitions, ships, cables, and all other 
things and implements to them belonging, charging and 
commanding him, on pain of oar curse, that he be ruled 
and ordered, both in his marriage, and in ordering of the 
affairs of this realm, and also in his own private affairs, by 
the advice and counsel of our well beloved councillors be- 
fore named, and will that they have the government of our 
said most dear son, and of all our realms and dominions, 
8lc until he shall have accomplished his I8th year. And 
furthermore, for the special trust and confidence we have in 
the Earls of Arundel and Essex that now be ; Sir Thomas 
Cheney, Knight, Treasurer of our Household ; Sir John 
Gage, Knight, Comptroller of our Household; Sir An« 
thony Wingfield, Knight, our Vice Chamberlain ; Sir Wil- 
liam Peter, Knight, one of our principal Secretaries ; Sir 



T£nrAliSNTA V£TUSTA. 43 

Sdph ^mSler, Knight; Sir Thomas Seymoar, Knight; 
Sir Richard Soathwell, Sir Edmund Peclcham^ K bights, 
they and every of them shall be of council for aiding and 
assisting the forenamed councillors and our executors 
when they or any of them shall be called by our said exe- 
cutors. Item, we bequeath to our daughters Mary and 
Elizabeth's marriages, they being married to any outward 
potentate, by the advice of our said Councillors (if we bestow 
them not in our life-time) <£ 10,000, and until they be mar- 
ried they shall Lave each of them from the hour of my 
my death .£3,000 ultra reprisas to live on. And for the 
great love, obedience, chasteness of life, and wisdom, being 
in our fore-named wife and Queen, we bequeath unto her 
£SfiOO in plate, Jewells, and stuff of household, besides 
such apparel as it shall please her to take of such as she 
hath already; and further, we give unto her «£ 1,000 in 
mone/, with the enjoyment of her dowry and jointure. 

Furthermore, for the kindness and good service which our 
said executors have shewn unto us, we give and bequeath 
to each of them such sums of money, or the value of the 
same as hereafter ensueth : first, to the Archbishop of Can- 
terbury 500 marks ; to the Lord Wryotheslie <£500 ; to the 
Lord St. John <£500 ; to the Lord Rnssell ^500 ; to the 
Eari of Hertford £500; to the Viscount Lisle <£500; to 
the Bishop of Durham .£300; to Sir Anthony Browne 
i^SOO; to Sir William Paget .£300; to Sir William Her- 
bert c£300 ; to Justice Montague <£300 ; to Justice Brom. 
ley .£300; to Sir Edward North i^300; to Sir Edward 
Wotton c£300 ; to Mr. Doctor Wotton .£300 ; ako, for the 
special love we bear to our trusty councillors and other our 
servants, ^' we give and bequeath unto them such sums as 
is tolled upon their heads ; first, to the Earl of Essex .£200 
to Sir Thomas Cheney £900; to the Lord Herbert £200 
to Sir John Gage .£200; to Sir Thomas Seymour' i^SOO 
to John Gates <£e00; to Sir Thomas Darcie, Knight, <£200 
to Sir Thomas Specke 200 marks ; to Sir Philip Hobby 200 
iharks; to Sir Maurice Berkeley 200 marks; to Sir Ralph 
Sadler .£200; to Sir James Carden .£200; to Sir Peter 
Newton 200 marks ; to Edward Bellingham 200 marks ; to 



44 TfiSTAM£NTA V£TUSTA. 

Thomas Audley 200 marks; to Edmund Harman 200 
marks; to John Penne .100 marks; to Henry Nevill 100 
marks; to Henry Nevill ^100; to William St. Barbe^lOO; 
to Richard Cooke c£lOO; to John Osbourn<£lOO ; to David 
Vincent c£lOO; to James Ruffbrth^ Keeper of our House 
bere^ 100 marks ; to Richard Cecill, Yeoman of our Robes^ 
100 marks; to Thomas Sternhold^ Groom of our Robes, 100 
marks; to John Rowland, Page of our Robes, c£50; to the 
Earl of Arundel, Lord Chamberlain, ,£200 ; to Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, Vice Chamberlain «£200 ; to Sir Edmund Peck- 
ham ^200; to Sir Richard Rich .£200; to Sir John Baker 
c£200 ; to Sir Richard Southwell c£200 ; to Mr. Doctor 
Owen i'lOO; to Mr. Doctor Wendy c£lOO; to Mr. Doctor 
Cromer ^100; to Thomas Alsop 100 marks; to Patrick 
. • . . 100 marks*; to . . . .Aylett 100 marks; to Henry 
Forest 100 marks ; to Richard Ferrers 100 marks ; to ... . 
Holland 100 marks; to the four gentlemen ushers of our 
chamber (being daily waiters) <£200 in all ;" and we will also 
that our executors give orders for the payment of such le- 
gacies as they may think meet to such of our ordinary ser- 
vants to whom we have not appointed any legacy by this 
our present testament. In witness' whereof we have signed 
it with our hand in our palace of Westminster the dOth 
day of December 1546, and of our reign the S8th year, 
being present and called to be. witnesses the persons which 
have written their names hereunder, John Gate, William 
Saint Barbe, Robert Hewicke, William Clerke, Richard 
Cooke, .... Patrick, Edward Harman, George Owen, 
Henry Nevill, David Vincent, Thomas Wendy ». 

* Brother to Lady Jane Se3rmour, Queen of England, created 1 
Edward VI. Baron Seymour of Sudley, and Admiral of England, 
K.G. He married Catherine Parr, widow of Henry VIII. (who died 
in child-bed in September 1548) and was beheaded 14th March 1549. 

* Copied from the will printed by Mr. Nichols, but from the 
names of the witnesses it appears that Patrick was the surname. 

> King Henry VIII. died January 28, 1547, and within a month 
after the date of his will. 



TESTAMENTA V£TUSTA. 45 



AGNES DE CLIFFORD. 

In the name, &c. I, Agnes de Clifford \ in the name of 
the Holy Trinity, bequeath to the Prior and Convent of 
the Holy Trinity of Canterbury, cs. of land in the town of 
Wicham, with the consent of my Lord Walter de Clifford; 
to the Church of St. Augustine of Canterbury xl«.; to the 
Church of St. Gregory xxs.; to the Church of the Holy 
Sepulture xx s, ; to the Hospital at Canterbury one mark 
and a half ; to the '^Heremit de Hoppa" one mark; to 
the Altar of All Saints of the Church of St. Andrew x 
marks for my soul ; to the Church of St. Radigund xx s, ; 
to the Church of Hotley one mark. Item, to each parish 
Church in Canterbury xii d. ; to the Church of St. Edelbert 
of Hereford xl s. ; to the Church of Hagenby xl s. ** et unam 
insulam ;" to the Church of Wenlock two marks ; to thirty 
poor maidens, to their marriage, xxxs. ; to the Priory of 
Clifford, ''duas insulas et unicum tuniclum;" to Basilia 
my daughter xx marks; ''Terrico Flandrensi" x marks; 
to Ralph Despencer x marks ; to Nicholas, Clerk, xx s. ; to 
Robert, Vialatori xxs.; to Herbert, William, and Richard, 
my servants, x s.; to Matilda my servant x marks, ^' et unam 



* This Agnes de Cli£Pordwas the daughter and sole heir of Ro- 
ger de Cundy, Lord of the Manors of Cavenby and Glentham, co. 
Lincoln; she married Walter Baron CIi£Pord, who was Sheriff of 
Hereford 1, 8, 9, and 17 John, and died 7 Henry III. There is 
no account when this Agnes died, and the transcript whence the 
above will is taken does not give the date of her will ; as however 
it was written during the life-time of her husband, who died in 
1823, it is manifest its date must have been some time prior to that 
year ; and from its being made at so very early a period it is worthy 
of notice. 



46 TESTAMBMTA VBTUSTA. 

robam de Skarket, et unam Gulecem " punctataiDy et anum 
cooptorium;" to Bartholomew de Newlof xxs.; toGalfroCuI- 
tario, X8. ; Gilbert de Chatirij half amark ; tp William Pis- 
tori half a mark; to Ide Parker half a mark ; to Lambert my 
seryant x s. ; to " Dfio Philippo, canonico," v «.; " Item, duo- 
bus parvis pistoribus duos soldos;" to Hamoa, preposito, 
y«. ; to '^ Richardy coco, vs.; et Thomas, socio suo, v s. ;" 
'' Will'oy summetar dni» xii d» ;" John, Venatori, xii d. Item, 
a palfrey, &c. ^et summS menro cUm ptin';" to theChufch 
pf the Holy Trinity /where I shall be buried; to the Anchor 
rites of St. Andrew, of Wicham, every year, so long as 
they shall live, two measures of whebt ; to Walter Aurifa- 
bro XX 8. ; to Walter de Nicholls xx s. ; to my mother ' a 
ring of gold ; to Walter % my son, a ring of gold ; to Ro-* 
ger % my son, Richard, my son, Simon, my son, and Giles, 
my son, a ring of gold each ; to each of my daughters a 
ring of gold ; to the Hospital of St. Wolstan, of Worces^ 
ter, . • • ; and fqjr the fulfilment of this my will, Walter de 
Clifford, my Lord, has granted the profits of the Manor of 
Cavenby « for one whole year after my decease, *' et War- 
dam de la Graye quod emi a Dno meo tarn diu quousq' 
hoc testamentum meum compleatur.'' Item, I desire that 
all my vestments and vessels of gold and silver be sold 
that my will may be fulfilled, and that the remainder be 
disposed of for my soul, at the discretion of my eJ^ecutors. 
I constitute my Lord Walter de Clifford, the Bishop of 



ft 

' Alice, daughter and heir of William de Cheney, Lord of 
Homcastle, co. Lincoln. 

* He succeeded his father in the Barony, but died 47 Henry HL 
s. p. m. ; Maud, his only daughter and heir, married, first, Willianl 
de Longespe, Earl of Salisbury ; and, secondly, John ' Giffiird, of 
Brimfield. 

) This Roger died vitA fratris, and his son Roger de Clifford 
succeeded to the inheritance, and was the common ancestor of the 
Barons Clifford and Earls of Cumberland, and of the Barons Clif^ 
ford of Chudleigh, &c. 

. ^ It appears from note * in the preceding page that this manor 
was part of her inheritance. 



TESTAMSNTA VETTUSTiC 4^- 

Hereford*, the Prior of Cfarist Church 6f Canterburjt^ 
HeDry Archdeacon of Canterbury % and Dno Peter de 
Hungria, my executors. Item, I bequeath to the Church 
of St. Martin of Dover xx *.♦ 



WILLIAM MARSHAL, EARL OF PEMBROKE. 

William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke', 1219. I bequeath 
my Manor of Caversham to my executors, the Abbot of 
St. Aagustine's, at Bristol, and Henry Fiugerald, until cer- 
tain of my debts are paid f. 



RICHARD* BISHOP OF CHICHESTER. 

I, Richard, by divine permission. Bishop of Chichester, 
being, &c. I will that my body be buried in the Church 



' Giles de Bruse 1200^1216 ; Hugh de Mapenore 1316—1219; 
Hugh Foliot 1219—1234. 

■ Le Neve states, that Henry de Sandford, Bishop of Roches- 
tor, was Archdeacon of Canterbury from 1202 to 1227> between 
which years this will must have been made, for no other Archdea- 
con of Canterbury was called Henry until 1374^ when Henry 
Wakefield possessed that dignity. Fasti Eccles. Angl. 

* Lansdown MSS. 1402. 

' He was first Earl of Pembroke of that name, which Earldom 
he obtained by marrying Isabel, daughter and heir of Richard 
StroDgbow, Earl of Pembroke ; he was buried in the Temple 
Church on May 16, 1219. 

f Dugdale's Baronage, vol. i. p. 602. 

* Le Neve calls him Richard de la Wich, but other writers style 
him Sir Richard, sumatned de la Wich. He was consecrated Bi« 
shop of Chichester in 1245, and died on the 2d or 3d of April 
1253, about which time he probably made his will, and was buried 
in his own Cathedral. From his describing Robert Chandos as his 



48- TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

of Chichester, before the altar of St. Edmund the Confess 
sor, near the pillar; to the said Charch xls.; to the Friars 
Minors of Chichester; my psalter andxx^.; • • • Robert Chan* 
dos my .brother ; to the Abbey of Lucoc my silver cup ; to 
the Abbey of Marham a silver cup ; to the House of Friars 
at Dover xx. s. ; to the marriage of the daughter of my sis- 
ter XX marks. I appoint the venerable man Dn John Man- 
sell, Prepositi Bever)ye \ the Dean of Chichester, and the 
Precentor of Chichester, my executors *. 



ROGER BIGOT, EARL OF NORFOLK-. 

In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, I, 
Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, Marshal of England, being. 



brother, it may be inferred, that he was either a member of that 
family, or that his sister had married the said Robert Chandos. 

■ He was also one of the executors to the will of King Henry 
III. in the same year in which it is conjectured that this will was 
written. 

* Lansdown MSS. 1000; there is no date assigned to it, but it 
is stated m a note that it was the will of Richard de la Wich, Bi- 
shop of Chichester, who died in 1253. 

• He was fourth Earl of Norfolk of this family, and fifth Earl 
after the Conquest, and succeeded his father in 1225 ; in right 
of his mother Maud, eldest sister and coheir of Anselme Earl 
of Pembroke and Earl Marshal, he was Marshal of England, 
and died s. p. in 1270, leaving Roger his nephew his heir, 
on whom his uncle's honours devolved, and who was the last 
Earl of that family. Hugh de Bigot, brpthcr of the testator, 
and father of the last Earl, was the celebrated Justiciar of 
England, to which office he was appointed by the Barons, who 
confederated against Henry III. and to whom Dugdale, vol. i. 
p. 135, attributes the above will. It is pretty certain that in this 
statement he is in error, for he not only gives a very imperfect 
abstract of it, but cites as his authority " Ex autogr. penes 
Phil. Comitem Arundell, an. 1586," whilst the will in the text, 
besides being much more complete, was copied Harl. MSS. 6019, 



TESTAMENTA VETIJSTA. 49 

&c. made this my will. Imprimis, I commend my soul to 
God, and my body to be buried iu the Church of the 
Blessed Mary of the Monastery of Thetford ; and I appoint 
Dom Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester; Dom de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester and Hertford ; Dom Thomas Denbande; 
Dom Hugh de Tudham, my executors. Dated at Cestre- 
ford on Wednesday next * after the Feast of St. Barnabas 
the Apostle, anno Dom. 1258, and 43 Henry III. 



WILLIAM DE LONGESPEE, EARL OF 

SALISBURY. 

William Earl of Salisbury *. I bequeath all the profits I 



f. 7> which is thus described in the Harleian Catalogue, " An ab- 
stract of the will of Roger Bigot, Earl of NorfF. &c. ** Ex chartis 
Philippi Com. Arundell, 1586, Robert Glover, Somerset, &c. 10, 
1^, &c. et a Will. Pole, Gent.*' Hence the source from which both 
abstracts have been taken is precisely the same, and it is not an 
uncommon circumstance for Dugdale*s transcripts of documents 
to be incorrect. In Harl. MSS. 6148, is the following note of a re- 
cord in the Prerogative Office: '^ 1282. John Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Ralph Bigot, John Bigot, and Richard Bigot, sons of Dom' 
Hugh Bigot, against John Earl Warren and John de Steingrave, exe- 
cutors of the aforesaid Hugh.*' It is possible that this note relates 
to Hugh Bigot, the Justiciar before-mentioned, for most pedigrees 
of Bigot state him to have had sons called Roger and John ; and one 
pedigree in Harl. MSS. 807> assigns him a son Hugh, but the edi- 
tor is not aware of any which asserts that the Justiciar had like- 
wise sons named Ralph and Richard. Simon de Montfort, Earl 
of Leicester, mentioned in the text, was that distinguished but 
turbulent Baron, who opposed the arbitrary measures of Henry III. 
and who occupies so prominent a place in the history of that reign ; 
he was killed at the battle of Evesham. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 758. 
The Earl of Gloucester, who is mentioned as the other executor, 
was probably Richard de Clare, who possessed that dignity from 
1229 to 1262. * 12th June. 

* William de Longespee was natural son of King Henry II. by 

E 



50 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

have received or shall receive by the wardship of the land 
and heir ^ of Richard de Camvillei for the building of a 
monastery of the order of Carthusians called God's House, 
until my heir come of full age ; to the said house a cup of 
gold^ set with emeralds and rubies ; also a pix of gold, with 
xLii s. and two goblets of silver, one of which is gilt ; like- 
wise a chesible and cope of red silk, a tunicle and dalma- 
tick of yellow cendal, an alba, amice, and stole ; also a fa- 
von and towel, with all my reliques ; likewise a thousand 
sheep, three hundred muttons^ forty-eight oxen, and fifteen 
bulls*. 



WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP. 

William de Beauchamp *, dated at Wauberge, upon the 
morrow after the Epiphany' anno 1268% 53 Henry I[[. my 
body to be buried in the Church of the Friars Minors 



Fair Rosamond, daughter of Walter de Cli£Pord; by marrying Ela, 
daughter and heir of William D*£vreux, Earl of Salisbury, he ac- 
quired that earldom. He was a celebrated warrior^ and distin- 
guished himself in the Holy Land, in the early part of the reign of 
Henry the Tliird, and died on the Nones of March 10 Henry III. 
i. e. 7th March 1226, having, it is said, been poisoned by Hubert de 
Burgh. His will was ratified by the tCing in the S8th Henry HI* 
Though he lefl several sons neither of them succeeded him in the 
Earldom of Salisbury. 

* Idonea, the daughter and heir of Richard de Camville, by £u- 
statia, daughter and heir of Gilbert Basset, married William de 
Longespee, the son and heir df the testator, and by him left issue. 

* Dugdale, vol. i. p. 177. 

^ He was father of the first Earl of Warwick, and died before 
the year 1269, having married Isabel de Mauduit, sister and 
heiress of William Mauduit, Earl of Warwick, from whom his son 
derived that earldom. Dugdale properly points out that it appears 
from his father's will, he assumed the title of Earl of Warwick 
during the life-time of his mother, his right to do so being consi- 
dered very doubtful. 

» January 7th. * 1268-9. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 51 

at Worcester. I will that a horse, completely harnessed 
with all military caparisons, precede my corpse; to a 
priest to sing mass daily in my Chapel without the City of 
Worcester, near unto that house of Friars which I gave for 
the health of my soul, and for the souls of Isabel my wife, 
Isabel do Mortimer, and all the faithful deceased, all my 
rent of the fee of Richard Bruli, in Wiche and Win- 
chester, with supply of what should be too short out of my 
own proper goods; to Walter, my son, signed with the 
cross, for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land on my behalf and 
of Isabel, his mother, two hundred marks; to Joane, my 
daughter, a canopy, sometime belonging to St. Wolstan> 
and a book of Lancelot, which I have lent them ; to Isa- 
bel, my daughter, a silver cup ; to Sibill, my daughter, all 
the money due to me from my son William^ towards her 
marriage, and xl marks more, with the land which I 
bought in Britlamton, to enjoy it until she be married, and 
no longer; to Sarah, my daughter, one hundred marks for 
her marriage; to William, my eldest ^on, the cup and 
h(»rns of St. Hugh; to my daughter the Countess, his 
wife^ a ring with a ruby in it; to Sir Roger de Mortimer 
and Sir Bartholomew de ^ley a ring each; to the Friars- 
Minors of Worcester forty shillings; to the Friars Minors 
of Gloucester one mark; to the Friars .Carmelites there 
one mark; to the Hospital of St. Wols tan at Worcester 
one mark ; -to the Hospital of St. Oswald there ten shil- 
lings ; to the Canons of Doddeford one mark ; to the 
Church and Nuns of Cokehill x marks ; to Isabel, my wife, 
'ten marks ; to the Church and Nuns of Westwood one 
mark ; to the Church and Nuns without Worcester one 
mark ; to every Anchorite in Worcester and the parts ad- 
jacent four shillings ; to the Church of Salewarp, a house 
and garden near the parsonage, to find a lamp to burn 
continually therein to the honor of God, the Blessed Vir-* 
gin, St. Katherine, and Saint Margaret; and I appoint my 
eldest son William Earl of Warwick, Sir Roger Mortimer, 
Sir Bartholomew de Sudley, and the Abbots of Evesham 
and of Great Malverne, my executors *. 

* Dugdale^ vol. i. p. 9S7* 

E 2 



52 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA, 



WILLIAM DE BEAUCHAMP, EARL OF 

WARWICK. 

William de Beaacbamp i. Earl of Warwicjc^ dated Holy 
Rood Day^ 1296, 25 Edward I.' being in perfect healtb. 
My body to be buried in the quire of the Friars-Minors, 
commonly called the Gray-firiars at Worcester, if I die 
within the compass of the four English Seas ; otherwise, 
then in the house of the Friars-Minors nearest to the place 
in which I may happen to die, and my heart to be buried 
wheresoever the Countess, my dear consort, may herself 
resolve to be interred ; to the place where I may be buried 
two great horses, viz. those which shall carry my armour 
at my funeral, for the solemnizing of which I bequeath two 
hundred pounds ; to the maintenance of two soldiers in the 
Holy Land one hundred pounds ; to Maud, my wife, all 
my silver vessels, with the cross, wherein is contained part 
of the wood of the very cross whereon our Saviour died ; 
likewise the vestments of my Chapel to make use of during 
her life; but afterwards the b^t suit to belong to Guy% 
my eldest son ; the second best to my Chapel of Hanslape; 
and the third best to my Chapel of Hanley ; to Guy, my 
son, a gold ring with a ruby in it, together with my bless- 
ing ; to my said wife a cup, which the Bishop of Worces* 
ter gave me, and all my other cups, with my lesser sort of 
jewels and rings, to distribute for the health of my soul, 
where she may think best; to my two daughters, nuns at 
Shouldham *, fifty marks *. 

* Son and heir of the preceding. He died either in May or 
June IS98. « September i4th. 

? Sic in Dugdale, but September 14, 1996, is the 24th of Ed- 
ward the First. 

* This Guy, Dugdale conjectures, was so named in memory of 
the famous Guy Earl of Warwick, renowned for his valour in the 
time of the Saxons. 

^ The Priory of Shouldham, in Norfolk, was founded by Geof- 

* Dugdale, vol. i. p. 289. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 53 



RICHARD ' BISHOP OF DURHAM. 

I, Richard, Bishop of Durham, make this my will on 
Sunday * next before the Feast of St. Michael 1316. I will 
that my body be boried in the Chapel of Durham, above 
the steps. Item, I bequeath two palfreys, that is to say, 
a black palfrey and a small grey palfrey, to the Church of 
Durham before my burial. Item, to the poor on the day 
of my burial c marks. Item, 1 bequeath all my goods to 
my executors, viz. my kinsman Patrick de Kellawe ; Dn 
Thomas de Hessewell, Rector of the Church of Seggesfield; 
Dn Robert de Brumpton, Prebend of the Church of Huk- 
land ; and Dn Roger de Saxton, Rector of the Church of 
Abberford, to dispose of for the health of my soul *. 



GUY DE BEAUCHAMP, EARL OF WARWICK. 

Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick ', dated at War- 
wick Castle Monday next after the Feast of St. James the 
^— "^^i^— ^■■^^^^— '^— ■'■i^— ■■^'^™'—^ I — — ^— i — — — -■^^— ^— . 

frey Fitz-Piers, Earl of Essex, temp. John, who, by his second wife, 
Aveline, was father of John Fitz-Geoffirey, Sheriff of York IB Henry 
III. whose son John Fitz-John was father of Maud Countess of 
Warwick ; hence the priory in which the religieuses mentioned in 
the above will were secluded was of the foundation of their great- 
great-grandfather by the mother's side, instead of its being, as Dug- 
dale observes, in p. ^9, a Monastery founded by ^eit great-grand- 
father. Vol. i. pp. 705, 706, 707. 

* Richard de Kellawe. The following information respecting 
him is taken from Fasti Eccl. Angl. << His Cong^ d*£lire was dated 
20th March, 1311; he was elected Bishop of Durham on the 30th 
of the same month, and was consecrated on the 90th of May in the 
same year. He died 9th October 1316, but where buried I know 
not." * September 96. 

* LansdownMSS. 1000. 

* Tliis Guy Earl of Warwick, whose celebrated exploits it is 
needless to describe here, died at Warwick Castle on the 98th of 



54 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

Apostle', 1315. My body to be buried id tlie Abbey of 
Bordsley, without any funeral pomp; to Alice % my wife, 
a proportion of plate, with a crystal cup and half my bed- 
ding, and also all the vestments and books belonging to 
my Chapel ; the other half of my beds, rings, and jewels, I 
bequeath to my two daughters ; to Maud, my daughter, a 
crystal cup ; to Elizabeth, my daughter, the marriage of 
Astley's heir'; to Thomas, my son, my best coat of mail, 
helmet, and suit of harness, with all that belongs thereto; 
to John, my son, my second coat of mail, helmet, and har- 
ness ; and I will that all the rest of my armour^ bows, and 
other warlike implements, shall remain in Warwick Castle 
for my heir. 



EDMUND DE BERFORDE^ 

Edmund de Berford, dated 8th January iS50K My body 
to be buried in the Conventual Church of St. Mary of 
Cbaucombe, between the steps and the altar; to my 
Church of Ailesbury; my son Baldwin de Berforde; 
whereas Sir Guy St. Clere is bound to me for one hundred 
pounds for the manor of Melinge, in Suffolk ; to Dame Jane 



August 1316. The abstract of his will is copied from Dugdale, 
but although only two daughters are there mentioned, the pedi- 
gree of this family in vol. i. p. 296, names five daughters. 

' July 28th. " Sister and heir of Robert de Tony. 

> Thomas de Astley, eldest son of Sir Giles de Astley, younger 
brother of Nicholas Baron Astley, to whose lands and honours he 
succeeded on his death s. p. and of which lands he had livery 19 
Edward II. This Thomas Lord Astley afterwards became the hus- 
band of the Lady Elizabeth Beauchamp here mentioned, to whom 
her father gave the benefit of his marriage. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 
669. 

* William de Bereford, probably of the same family, if not the 
immediate ancestor of this Edmund, was summoned to Parliament 
8 Edward II. 1314. * Query ? 1350-1 . 



TE8TAMENTA VETU9TA. 



55 



de Elesfield, my sister; to Sir Gilbert de Elesfield, her son ; 
to Dame Margaret de BroughtoD, my niece ; to Ellen de 
Beaufoe, her sister; to Thomas de Elesfield and William 
his brother ; Dame Margaret de Audley, my sister ; to Wil- 
liam de Audley, her son, and Joan his wife ; to Margaret 
de Audley, my niece; to Thomas de Audley; to John 
d'Audley, my nephew ; to Dame Agnes, my sister ; to Sir 
John, her son ; to John Loveday, a cup, price thirty shil- 
lings ; to Sir William Misbone ; to Sir William Shares* 
hull; William le Payfreman ; Sir Philip Inglefield, and 
John his son; to Dame Katharine St. Liz, a nun atGode- 
stow, my lands in Norfolk and Suffolk. I appoint Sir 
William de ShareshuU and Payne Mohun, my executors. 



SIR JOHN DE SEGRAVE. 

Sir John de Segrave, dated at Bretby 1352. My body 
to be buried in the Priory of Chaucombe, and I appoint 
Sir Thomas Ferrers, Knt. and Henry, Prior of that house, 
my executors. 



WILLIAM LORD CLINTON. 

William Lord Clinton, dated 23d August 1354, 28 E. III. 
My body to be buried in the Church of my Priory at Mar- 
stoke *. 



■ Dugdale^voKi. p. 531. He died on Sunday next after the 
Feast of St. Bartholomew the Apostle in th& same year, viz. Au- 
gust 31, 8. p. 



56 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



ELIZABETH DE BURGH, LADY OF CLARE*. 

I, Elizabeth de Burg, Lady of Clare, &c. dated at Clare 
25th September 1355. My body to be buried io the Sisters 
MiDoriesy beyond Aldgate, London; I devise cclb. of wax 
to burn round my corpse, and I will that the surplus be 
given to the neighbouring poor churches. Item, I will 
that my body be not buried for fifteen days after my de- 
cease. Item, I will that my servants be paid in manner 
following : to Mons^ Nicholas Dammory, Robert Ma- 
rcscball, Susan de Neketon, Ann de Lexeden, Elizabeth 
Torel, Margaret Banchon, Colmet de Morlce and Isabel 
his wife, John de Southam and Agnes his wife, Alison 
de Wodeham, Johannette Drueys, Sir John de Lenne, 
Sir Peter de Ereswell, Sir Henry Motelot, Sir William de 
Mantonz, frereJohn de Haselbech, frere Robert de Wise- 
bech. Sir William Albon, Sir John de Chiph'm, Sir Ed- 
ward Sothword, Sir John de Huntyngdon, Sir William de 
Berkwey, Sir William de Wykkewane, Sir William Ail- 
mare, Sir William de Ditton, Sir Henry Palmer, Sir Wil- 
liam Coke,frere John L'Eremyte, Sir John de Kireby, Rich- 
ard de Waterden, John de Clare, John Bataile, Robert 
Flemengs, John de Horselee, Walter de Kireby, Nicholas 
Nowers, John Gough, Humphrey de Waleden, Thomas 
Charman, Richard de Kingeston,AlexanderCharman, Rich- 
ard de Buskeby, John le Messag', Philip Lichet, Stephen 
Derby, John de Knare&burgh, William Beneyt, Richard de 



* Third daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by 
Joan D'Acres, daughter of King Edward the First. She was 
foundress of Clare Hall, Cambridge, and was thrice married ; first, 
to John de Burgh, son and heir of Richard Earl of Ulster, who 
died in 1315 ; secondly, in 1315, to Theobald Lord Verdon ; and, 
thirdly, to Roger Damory. This celebrated woman died Nov. 4, 
1360, having survived her last husband several years. Her will, 
which is very curious, is printed at length in Nichols* Royal Wills, 
p. 22, hence it has been thought necessary to extract little be- 
sides the names of those persons and places she mentions. 



TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. SJ 

Wodeham, John. Motelot, Thomas de. Lynton^ Firmyn de 
Shropbam, John de Henle, Walter de Coleshull, William 
de Stone, Stephen le Pelleter, William de Colecestre, Tho- 
mas Montjoye, Thomas Scot, John le Lardiner, Hagb le 
Pallitier, Richard le Pasteler, John de Dunmowe, Henry le 
Pulletier, Cok Haveryings, John Brian, John.Whitehened, 
John Braceour, John de Rushton, Johnde.Chaundeler, Rich- 
ard le Gayte^ Richard le Charer, Jost'an Forester, Richr 
ard Forrider, John de Kent, John de Rineshale, John le 
Venour, Richard de Waltham, John Parker of Southfrith, 
John Parker bailiff of Erbury, Roger Garbedon, Richard 
Segor, Richard atte Pole, William Edward, Simon Parker 
of Trillek, Adam le Baker, William . Gruffurth, Thomas 
Aylmer^ Esmond Edward of Famham, John Bacon bailiff 
of Burton, Nicholas Artour bailiff of Cranebum, John 
Goffe bailiff, of Wyke, Thomas Palmer provost of Stojce 
Verdon, Adam ap Wyllym bailiff of Novelgraunge, Rich- 
ard Cook bailiff of Liawyry, Richard Toyere provost of 
Troye, Robert de la Chambre, John.de Warden, Nichol de 
Ewer and Isabel his wife, John de Redyngs, Thomas de 
Redyns, Thomas de Hehham, John Testepyn, Richard 
groom of the chamber, Thomas le Purtreour, Richard de 
Lanyngton, John '^ garceon de la Botelleries," Adam de la 
Pestriae, William Bacon, Robert Wolwy, Perot de Ho- 
land, John Caton, John Luceson, Robert Luceson, Henry 
Cnappyngs, Richard de la Forge, Robert de la Chaupde- 
lerie, Walter Hunte, William Joliffe, John le Seller; to. 
all the pages of my " hostel" that wear my livery ; for 
masses to be sung for the souls of Monsi* John.de Bourg, 
Mons' Theobaud de Verdon, and Monsr Roger Dammory, 
my lords, for my soul, and for the souls of all my good 
isind loyal servants who have died or may die in my service 
cxl/s.; to find five armed men for the Holy Land c marks, 
to be spent in the service of God and destruction of his 
enemies, if any general voyage be made within seven years 
after my decease; for the souls of my Lords Mons^ John, 
Monsr Thebaud, Mons^ Roger above-mentioned, and mine ; 
to the Sisters Minors without Aldgate^ London ; to the Sis- 
ter Katharine de Ingham, Abbess of that house xx/»«; to 



5H 

emcktitur oiiksA ^hhej dedajof Bjbmial xiiis. luidL; 
to mj baD caOed Clareball, in Cambridge ''denxboM ai»* 
tipfaooen diefciin ove on gtajd en mesae le Toluiy 1 bone 
kgeodcy 1 bone meMale bien noce, 1 aotie messale coveit 
de blank qoir, 1 bone bibkoorertdenoirqair, 1 bogncion*, 
1 iegeade fanctonun, 1 pone de decretak, 1 livie des qaes- 
tfons^ et XXII qnaien d'on Kvie appella de cansa Dei con- 
tra Pelagianot;^ to tbeCatbedral CbarcbofSt. Paal; to 
Saint Thomas of Heieford ; to the Chorch of Walsingbam ; 
to the leligions bonset of Stokes, Angksej, Craoeboom, 
Tonebrigges, Tjmieroe, Usk, Thetfoid, Swafham, Su:. ; to 
Dame Elizabeth, mj danghter, Coontess of Ulster, the debt 
which mj son, her father, owed me at his death * ; also to 
mjr said daughter for seed com in the manors of ray inhe- 
ritance ^ en la baillie" of Qare, that is to say, Stanndon, 
BerdefeU, Clarete, Erboiy, Hoveden, Woodehalle, Bri- 
cbam, and Walsingbam ; '' en la baillie ** of Dorset, that 
i§ to say, Craneboome, Tarent, Pimpeme, Stapel, Wykes, 
and Portlonde ; and in Wales, Troye, Trillek, Lancombe, 
Novell Graonge, Lantsan, and Tregroke * ; to my daughter 
Bardolf my bed of green veket, 8cc. ; to Mods' John de 
Bardolf, and to my said daughter his wife, jointly in my 



' Hugutio or Hugh de VoraelUs, Bishop of Terrara, a great 
writer on the<lecretals. Royal Wills. 

* In the original, *^ Je devise k Dame Elizabeth, ma filie, Comi- 
tefse d*Ulvestiery tote la dette qe mon fils son piere me devoit le 
Jour q*il morust." Royal Willsi p* 34. To which the editor has 
subjoined the following note : ** Maud, daughter of Henry Earl 
of Lancaster, and sister to Henry Duke of Lancaster, married 
to her son William de Burgh, Earl of Ulster. Sandford, p. 142.'* 
Thus it is certain that this passage has been misunderstood, for 
it will be seen in other parts of this work that the word << daugh- 
ter *' was frequently used about that period, in testaments, for 
grand-daughter. The person alluded to by the testator was evi- 
dently Elizabeth, her grand-daughter^ the daughter and heiress of 
her son William de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, who afterwards married 
Lionel Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence. 

' Hero follows a description of the different kinds of corn, 
beans, &c. 



TE8TAMENTA VETU6TA. 59 

manors of Cathorp and Clapton^ for seed com, &c ; to my 
young ' daughter Isabel Bardolf, to her marriage ; to Ag- 
nes, her sister, to her marriage; to Monsieur William de 
Ferrers % in my manor of Litleworth, seed com, &c.; 
to Mons^* Thomas Fumiyal *, on my manors of Famham, 
Sere, Stoke, Verdon, and Wyndeford, seed com, 8cc«; to 
my daughter Countess of AthoH; to my Lord the King 
for hia College of Windsor ; to my Lord the Prince; to 
the Duke of Lancaster my little psalter, 8&c. ; to Dame 
Mary de St. Paul, Countess of Pembroke, a little cross of 
gold with a sapphire ; to Dame Joan de Bar, Countess of 
Warren, an image of St. John the Baptist ; I will that my 
executors make to Sir John Leche an acquittance of lOOD 
marks. I appoint the following to be my executors : Monsr 
Michol Dammory, Sir John de Lenne, Sir Henry Motelot, 
John Bataille, Sir Piers de Ereswell, Robert Mareschal> 
Sir William de Man ton, principal and chief; Sir Henry 
Palmer, Richard de Buskeley, Thomas Charman, Alexan- 
der Charman, Humphrey de Waleden, Richard de Kynges- 
ton, John Motelot, and Sir William de Berkeooz,^' secun- 
daires *." Proved 3 non. December' 1360. 



> << Joefne fille" in the original, manifestly intended to describe 
her grand-daughters, the children of Lord and Lady Bardolf. 

• Probably her grandson, WilL'am Lord Ferrers, of Groby, son 
of Henry Lord Ferrers, by Isabel, her only child by Theobald de 
Verdon, 

' Most likely the grandson of Theobald Verdon, her second 
husband, by a former wife. 

« <' Ma fille Countesse d'Atthelles." Elizabeth, daughter of 
Henry Lord Ferrers of Groby, by Isabel, daughter of Elizabeth 
de Clare, the testatrix, by her second husband Hieobald de Ver- 
don ; she married, first, David de Strabolge, Earl of Athol, and died 
38d October 49 Edward III. She was consequently Lady de 
Clare's grand-daughter. 

* Royal WiUs, pp. 34, 49. It is worthy of observation that in 
this will some lands are described to be <' en les Countees de Dor- 
set, WilU, et ChiUerne" 

^ 3 December. 



60 TESTAMENTA VEtUSTA. 



ELIZABETH COUNTESS OF NORTHAMPTON. 

ly Elizabeth de BohuDi Countess of Northampton \ on 
the last day of May 1356, with the leave of my hus^band, 
do make this my will. My body to be buried in the quire 
of the Church of the Friars Preachers, London; to that 
Church c marlcs sterling, and also the cross made of the very 
wood of our Saviour's Cross, which I was wont to carry about 
me, and wherein is contained one of the thorns of his crown ; 
also, I bequeath to the said Church two fair altar cloths of 
one suit, two of cloth of gold, one chalice, one missal, one 
graile*, and one silver bell, likewise thirty-one ells of linen 
cloth for making of albes *, one pulpitary, one portfory \ 
and an holy water pot of silver ; to the Friars Preachers at 
Oxford one hundred marks, two whole vestments, with two 
whole copes thereto'appertaining,two cloths of gold of one 
suit and one chalice ; to the Friars Preachers of Cam- 
bridge fifty pounds ; to those of Chelmsford twenty pounds ; 
to those of Exeter twenty pounds ; also I will that one hun- 
dred and fifty marks be distributed to several other con- 
vents of Friars Preachers, in such manner as Friar David 
de Stirington shall think best^ for my soul's health ; to the 
Grey Friars in London five marks ; to the Carmelites five 
marks; and to the Augustines five marks; to the Church 
of Rochford one pair of vestments which I used on holi- 
days in my own Chapel ; to the Earl of Hereford my lord 
a tablet pf gold with the form of a crucifix^thereon ; to 
Humphrey ', my son, a cup of silver gilt with two basons 



* She was sister and coheir of Giles Lord Badlesmere, and died 
before her husband William de Bohun, first Earl of Northampton, 
K. G. who died in 1360. 

* Or <' grayie,*' an ecclesiastical book used in the Romish Church, 
containing certain parts of the service of the Mass, the Hymns 
called Gradales or Graduals. Nares*8 Glossary. 

' Albes was the white dress of a Bishop, which differed from a 
surplice in having regular sleeves. Nares. 

* Breviary, a portable book of prayers. Ibid, 
succeeded his father as Earl of Northampton, and his 



TB8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 6l 

and oDe ewer of silver; to Elizabeth, my daughter \ a bed 
of red worsted embroidered ; to my sister^ the Countess of 
Oxford % a black horse and a nonche ; to my sister Roos ' 
a set of beads of gold and jet, with a firmaile ; to Agnes 
Devereux*; John Avenell; Richard Waldegrave. 



SIR ROGER HILLARY. 

Sir Roger Hillary, Knt. Chief Justice of the Common 
Pleas ^ dated Thursday^ after St. Ambrose 1356.. My 
body to be buried in the Church of All Saints in Walsale ; 
to Katharine, my wife; to Margaret, wife of Roger my son ; 
to Roger de Onley and Eleanor his wife ; to William my 
father; to Agnes my mother; to Roger my uncle; to John, 
Richard, and Robert, my brothers; I appoint my wife, my 
sons, and John de Aston, my executors. 



SIR OTHO DE GRANDISON. 

Sir Otho de Grandison, Knt.' dated Monday before the 

uncle as Earl of •Hereford and Essex. Vide his will in a subse- 
quent page. 9^' 

* Married Richard Fitz-Alan^ Ear] of Arundel. 

* Maud, another sister and coheir of Lord Badlesmere, who 
married John de Vere, Earl of Oxford* . 

> Margery de Badlesmere, also a sister aud coheir of Lord Ba- 
dlesmere, wife of William Lord Roos of Hamlake. 

4 This and the following persons are omitted in Dugdale's ab- 
stract of this will, vol. i. p. 186. 

^ He is said to have been Chief Justice of the Common Pleas 
from February lOth, 1353, to June 97th, 1357, when he probably 
died. * 8 December. 

7 This Otho de Gri^ndison was a distinguished personage temp. 
Edward 11. in the first year of whose reign he was sent ambassador 
to the Pope, but it does not .appear that he was ever.summoned to 



62 TBSTAMBNTA VKTU8TA. 

birth of our Lady, being September IStb, 1356 '• My body 
to be buried in the Collegiate Church of St. Mary de Ot- 
tery, in the diocese of Exeter, if lahoold happen to die therein; 
if I die at Chellesfield, then to be buried in the Chapel of St. 
John at Cbellesfield. I entreat that no armed bqrse or armed 
man be allowed to go before my bod}' on my burial day, 
nor that my body be covered with any cloth painted or 
gilt, or signed with my arms ; but that it be only of white 
cloth marked with a red cross ; and I give for the charges 
thereof xxL and x quarters of wheat; to a priest to cele- 
brate divine service in the Church at Cheliesfield, for three 
years after my decease xv/ ; to several Churches, and to 
the impotent of my parish, for the soul of Sir Gilbert Beau- 
champ; to the cross at the North door of St» Paul's; to 
Thomas, my son, all my armour, four horses, twelve oxen, 
and two hundred ewe sheep ; to Elizabeth, my daughter, 
six dishes, six saucers, and four cups of silver; to William, 
my bastard son. I appoint Beatrix, my wife, and Sir Tbeo- 
bold de Moatney my executors. 



JOHN EARL OF OXFORD. 

John de Vere, Earl of Oxford % at Bentley, on Friday 
being the Feast of All Saints ', 1358. My body to be bu- 
ried in the Chapel of our Lady in the Priory of Colne, on 
the South side the quire, at the head of John and Robert, 

Parliament. He died in the 33d Edward HL 1359, very aged, 
and his son and heir Thomas died s. p. in the 50th year of the same 
reign. 

' There is some mistake in the date of this will. The Feast of 
the Nativity of Our Lady occurs on September 8, which in 1358, 
fell on a Saturday, and the Monday before must have been Sep- 
tember 3. 

* He died January 24th following the date of his will, viz. 32 . 
Edward III. 1359. 

' Query, AILjSouIs, November 2d. llie Feast of All Sauits in 
1358, viz. November 1st, fell on a Thvirsday. 



TBSTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 68 

my soDSy who are there baried ; I will that cccc marks 
sterling, left by my ancestors in aid of the Holy Land, be 
paid by my executors with all convenient speed ; toward 
the building of the Church of Colne c marks; to re-edify 
the Chapel called the New Abbey in Castle Hengham c 
marks, to the end that masses be there celebrated as here- 
tofore by one or two priests; to Maud, my wife', all the 
utensils of my house, as well those of silver as others ; to 
Maud, my daughter ^ for her marriage, m marks. And I 
appoint Sir John Suttonyi Sir John Bennington, John Pel^ 
ham, and Sir William Lavenham, my executors. 



SIR GUY DE BEAUCHAMP. 

Sir Guy de Beauchamp, Knt.' dated at Canterbury 26th 
September 33 Edward III. 1359* My body to be buried 
where my parents shall think proper; to the Earl, my fa- 
ther, my best gold ring ; to the Countess, my mother, my 
next best; to Philippa«, my wife, my third best ; to Kathe- 
rine, my daughter, a nun at Shouldham, my fourth best ; I 
pray my Lord Bardolph, my wife, and others, to whom it 
appertaineth, that they will cause the Church of Neketon, 
in Norfolk, which is of my patronage, to be appropriated 

■ She was the sister and coheiress of Giles Lord Badlesmere, 
and widow of Robert Fitz-Pain. Dugdale, voL i. p. 192. 

^ Her name does not appear in Dugdale*8 pedigree of the Earls 
of Oxford, as he only mentions Margaret and Isabel. 

> Son and heir apparent of Thomas third Earl of Warwick; he 
died viik patris, and without male issue, in the April following the 
date of his will, and was buried in a Chapel at Vendorme in 
France. The inscription on his tomb there, as given by Dugdale, 
states that he died April 28, mcccli ; but the year is unquestion- 
ably erroneous, and is perhaps a typographical error, or the x 
which should follow the l might have been obliterated before the 
inscription was copied from the stone. 

* Daughter of Henry Lord Ferrers of Groby ; she made a vow 
of chastity l ith August, 1360. Vide Dugdale, vol. i. p. 234 



64 TESTAMENtA VETUSTA. 

to the Monastery Cburcb of Shouldhamy for the sustenance 
of Katherine and Margaret, my daughters *, and that after- 
wards the said house of Shouldham shall find a priest to ce- 
lebrate divine service daily for the souls of the said Kathe- 
rine and Margaret, and all the faithful departed. 



JOAN ST. LEGER. 

Dame Joan, widow of Ralph St. Leger, appointed Sir 
Arnold Savage, Knt. and Thomas Parker, her executors ; 
and by an account rendered by them to the Prerogative 
Court of Canterbury, dated at Maghfeld 4th April 1359, it 
appears that Ralph, Arnold, Henry, Bartholomew, and 
Eleanor, were her children. 



HENRY DUKE OF LANCASTER-. 

We, Henry Duke of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Lincoln, 
and Leicester, Steward of England, Lord of Brigerak and 

* The abstract of Guy de Beauchamp's will, as it stands in Dug- 
dale, vol. i.p. ^5, is followed in the text by calling Margaret his 
daughter; but from a note of it in a MS. in the British Museum, it 
would appear that he described her as his ststevy and which is the 
more likely to be correct from Dugdale's informing us, that Ka- 
therine, aged seven years, and Elizabeth, aged about one year, 
were found to be daughters and heirs of this Guy, without mention- 
ing any daughter caJled Margaret, who, it is not very probable, 
died between September 26th, 1359, the date of his will, and the 
28th April 1360^ when he died. Margaret, the sister of the testator, 
is said to have married Guy de Montfort about 1347, ai^d as the 
said Guy was certainly dead in the 35th of Edward IIL 1361, with- 
out leaving issue (vide Dugdale, vol. i. p. 410), it is possible that he 
died a few years before, and that his widow had taken the veil in 
Shouldham when her brother made his will. Vide also Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 235. 

* Surnamed Grismond, from the Castle of Grismond in Mon- 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 65 

Beaafort, dated at our Castle of Leicester March 15tb, 
1360. Our body to be buried in the Collegiate Church of 
the Annunciation of our Lady at Leicester, on that side of 
the high altar where the body of our lord and father, whom 
God pardon, is interred. Item, we will that our body be not 
buried for three weeks after the departure of our soul ; and 
also we will that our Lord the King \ my Lady the Queen, 
be invited to our funeral ; and Mons' the Prince, and my 
Lords his brothers, my wife Lady Isabell, our sisters *, and 
our brothers their Lords, and other distinguished persons of 
our blood ; and we appoint the Reverend Father in God 
John Bishop of Lincoln ', the honorable man of holy reli- 

mouthshire> where he was born. He was the only son of Henry Earl 
of Lancaster, son of Edmund Earl of Lancaster, the second son of 
King Henry IH. On the 16th March 11 Edward III. he was 
created Earl of Derby ; on the 20th August 93 Edward III. Earl 
of Lincoln; and on the 6th March 25 Edward III. Duke of 
Lancaster. He was likewise one of the founders of the Order of 
the Garter, and distinguished himself in the wars and councils of 
his time. By Isabel, his wife, daughter of Henry Lord Beaumont 
he had two daughters his heirs ; Maud, who married first, Ralph, 
son and heir of Ralph Lord Stafford ; and secondly, William 
Duke of Zeland ; and Blanch, the first wife of John of Gaunt, 
Earl of Richmond, &c. who was created Duke of Lancaster in con- 
sequence of his marriage. Maud did not leave any descendants, 
but Blanch was mother of Henry IV. Henry Duke of Lancaster, 
the testator, died of the pestilence at Leicester on the Eve of the 
Annunciation of our Lady, March 24, 35 Edward III. anno 4Mf .>o^. 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 780, et^eq. 

* To whom he was third'cousin. 

* He had six sisters. Blanch, wife of Thomas Lord Wake; 
Maud, who married first, William Earl of Ulster; and secondly, Sir 
Ralph D'Ufford; Joan, wife of John Lord Moubray ; Eleanora^ who 
married, first, John Lord Beaumont ; and secondly, Richard Fitz- 
Alan, Earl of Arundel ; Mary, wife of Henry Lord Percy ; and 
Isabel, Prioress of Ambresbury. 

* John Sinwenwas Bishop of Lincoln from 1351 to 1363, ac- 
cording to Beatson*s Political Index, vol. i. p. 201; but in a note to 
Royal Wills, p. 85, apparently on the authority of Antiq. Brit. p. 
365, he is called John Gynwell or Geneville. 

F 



66 TESTAMEVTA VETUSTA. 

gion William Abbe of Leicester, our very dear sister Lady 
Wake, our very dear cousin of Walkynton, Monsieur Ro- 
bert la Mare, Mods' John de Bokelonde, Sir John de 
Charnele, Sir Walter Power, Sinkyn Simeon, and John 
de Neumarche, our executors. Proved 3 kal. April 136), 
at Leicester, and in London 7 idus of May * following *• 



HUMPHREY DE BOHUN, EARL OF HEREFORD. 

We, Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, 
and Lord of Brecknock ^ on the Sunday* following St. 
Denis, in October lS6l, make our testament. We will 
that our body be buried among the poor brothers, Augus- 
tine Friars, in the choir of their Church in London, before 
the high altar, without any pomp, and that no great men 
be invited to our funeral, which shall only be attended by 
one Bishop and by common people. We will that our ex- 
ecutors pay to Friar William de Monkland, our Confessor; 
Friar William Wilhale, Master of Divinity; and Friar 
GeofFery de Berdefeld ccc marks ; to the Order of Friars 
aforesaid a black vestment, marked with the arms of 
England ; to our Chapel within our Castle of Ple&sy ; to 
Friar John de Teye ; to our dear nephew Humphrey de Bo- 
hun ^ a nouche of gold surrounded with large pearls, with a 

■ 30th March. * 9th May. 

• Royal Wills, p. 83. 

' Son of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, 
Constable of England, by Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of King 
Edward the First. He succeeded to these earldoms on the death 
of his brother John, 10 Edward IIL was a Knight of the Garter, 
and died without issue October 15, 1361, aged about 50. Dug- 
dale, vol. i. p. 184, 185. 

« October 10. 

» Son of his brother William « de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, 
K. G. and who succeeded his uncle in the titles of Hereford and 
Essex, &c. and died in 1372, leaving two daughters his coheirs, 
Eleanor, who married Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, 



TESTAMEMTA VBTUSTA. 67 

ruby between four pearls, three diamonds, and a pair of gold 
paternosters of fifty pieces, with ornaments,, together with 
a cross of gold, in which is a piece of the tnie cross of our 
Lord ; to Elizabeth, our niece^ of Northampton \ a bed 
with the arms of England ; to our niece Dame Catherine 
D'£Dgayne* xhtt. '^ pur sa chambre"; to our sister. 
Countess of Ormond'; to our brother Mons' Hugh de 
Courtenay, Earl of Devonshire «, a large sapphire stone of 
a fine blue colour; to our sister. Countess of Devonshire, 
a bed, &c. and a bason, in which we are accustomed to 
wash our head, and which belonged to Madame my mo- 
ther' ; to the Abbey of Walden ; to Sir Nichol de Neuton ; 
to Sir Thomas de Walmesford ; to Sir Stephen atte Roche ; 
to Sir William Agoldeshalf ; to Walter Blount and Mari* 
anne his wife ; to Lettice de Massendon ; Helen Smyth ; 
to Thomasin Belle xl marks for her marriage, or more if 
she be well married ; to John de Chertesey xl marks, if he 
be aiding to our executors ; to Robert Nobet and Cathe* 
rine his wife; to Simon Peiche; to William Nobet; to 
John Maundeville; to J'ne de Sandhurst; to Friar Wil* 
liam Belle; to John Attefurd; to Thomas Docking; to 
John atte Roche; to John Bonallet'; to William de la 
garderobe xlK. and a robe with a mantle for his fee; to 
Henry Skynnere ; to John Middleton ; to Richard Mai* 
don ; to Piers Peyn ; to William Hurle ; to Watkin Potter ; 
to Walter de la Chambre ; to Raunde de la Chambre ; to 
Henry de la Chaumbre; to John Rolf; to John Luminour; 
to Joh'n rouge Potager; to William de Barton '^hasti- 
W; to JohnUssher; to William Gamage; to John Ralph 
'^ venour"; h un garson pur le ferour xx«.; to John Rare- 

and bad issue ;and Mary, who being wife of Henry IV. was Queen 
of £ngland. 

^ Daughter of his brother William Earl of Northampton ; she 
married Richard Fitz- Alan, sixth Earl of Arundel, K. G. 

* Daughter of his sister Margaret Courtenay, Countess of De- 
vonshire, and wife of Sir Thomas D*Engaine. 

3 Wife of James Butler, Earl of Ormond. 

* Who married his sister Margaret de Bohun, above-mentioned. 
^ Elizabeth Piantagenet^ daughter of King Edward I. 

F 2 



68 T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 

nestone xhs. and an old robCi that is to say, a coat and sur- 
coat ; to Robert de Legh'es ; to Salkyn Wystok ; to Be- 
noyt de la Quisine i mark; k Wbitenod i marc; to 
Gibbe Parkere; to Perimant; to Roger Hergest; pur 
laveurye i garson xxs.; si vi charetters, chescun de eux 
V marcs, cest assavoir a ceux q' suiet lungement demurrez 
ovesq' nous : et a les autres meynes solom leur demeure 
p' avisament de nos executours ; to Mestre Thomas de Fe- 
rour; k Davy q'est Barber et Ewer xls.; k un garson 
feurer i marc. We bequeath to the executors of Sir Ste- 
phen de Greveshende, late Bishop of London '| xx marks, 
which we owed him. We appoint Friar William, Abbe of 
Walden; Friar William Monkeland our Confessor, Sir Ni- 
chol de Meuton, and Sir Thomas de Walmesford, and Sir 
Stephen atte Roche, our Clerks, our executors. We will 
also that a chaplain of good condition be sent to Jeru- 
salem principally for my Lady my mother, my Lord my 
father, and for us ; and that the chaplain be charged to say 
masses by the way at all times that he can conveniently for 
the souls; and that a good and loyal man be sent to Can- 
terbury, and to offer there xls. silver for us; and another such 
man to Pomfret to oifer at the tomb of Thomas, late Earl 
of Lancaster xi^. We will that our executors take c /. 
and buy a piece of land, and therewith enfeoff John de 
Mortimer and the children of his body. Sec. 

In witness of this our will we here put our seal in our 
Castle of Plessy, the year and day aforesaid. And whereas 
we intended to found a chantry in honour of God and 
Saint Anoe, to pray for us, and which was interrupted by 
the death of our dear brother of Northampton*, we will, if 
the said chauntry be not Bnished in our life-time, that our 
executors buy as much land as the value of the manor of 
Dunmawe, and found it in the Priory of Scoule or else- 
where, if they think it more advisable^. Proved before 
Simon' Archbishop of Canterbury 13 kal.< November 1361, 
at the New Temple, London. 

* He died ia 1338. 

* His brother, the Earl of Northampton, died the year before. 

* Royal Wills, p. 44. » Simon Sudbury. * October 20th. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 69 



THOMAS COBHAM. 

Thomas de Cobliam ', 13th January 1367 '. My body to 
be buried in the parish Church of St. Mary Magdalen at 
Cobham ; to the chauntry of priests there c shilliugs ; to 
my brother John de Cobham^ Knt. Lord Cobham a horse; 
to my brother Sir Reginald de Cobham, parson of Cou- 
linge, a horse ; to Julian my wife. 



JULIAN LADY CLINTON. 

Julian de Clinton ' SOth October 1367. My body to be 
buried on the South side of the Church of St. Augustine, 
Canterbury. 



SIR PETER MONTFORT, KNT. 

Peter de Montfort, Lord of Beaudesert, Knight % Sun- 
day next after the Conception of our Lady* IS67. My 
body to be buried in the Church of the Friars Preachers of 



^ A younger brother of John Lord Cobham^ who died 9 Henry 
IV. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 68. 

* The date given of this will by Dugdale, is the 13 kal, January 
i. e. 20th December 1367, but the date in the text is copied from 
a note of this testament in Harleian MSS. 6148. 

3 Daughter and heir of Sir Thomas de Leybum, Knight, wife 
firsts of John Lord Hastings of Bergavenny ; and secondly, anno 
3 Edward III. of William de Clinton, Lord Clinton ; Lady Clin- 
ton died on Monday, the Feast of All Saints, November 1st, 1367. 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 531, 532. 

* This Peter de Montfort was summoned to Parliament from 
the Ist to the 23d of Edward III. and died anno 1369. 

* Query? 12th pecember. 



70 TESTAMRNTA VETUSTA. 

Warwick, to which Church I give ten pounds that they shall 
pray for my soul ; to the nuns of Penley ten pounds to pray 
for my soul ; to the Lady Lora Astley *, a nun there c shillings ; 
to my cousin Sir Baldwin Freville the elder xx pounds ; to 
my son Richard de Montfort all my silver and gilt plate, 
and also all my goods moveable and immoveable^ lying in 
my manors of Kingshurst in Warwickshire, and Odes in 
Wiltshire ; for prayers for the souls of my father and my 
mother, and all the faithful deceased c/. ; and I will that all 
my servants be rewarded at the discretion of my executors. 



SIR THOMAS DE UVEDALE, KNT. 

Thomas de Uvedale, Knt. the Saturday * on St. Leonard's 
Feast 1367* My body to be buried in St. James's Chapel 
in the parish Church of Tichesey; my wife to finish that 
Church, and I will that prayers be said for John de Pole, 
from whom I had goods ; and I appoint Benedict my wife, 
Roger Digge, and William Tirwhitte, my executors. 



LIONEL DUKE OF CLARENCE. 

Lionel Duke of Clarence % in the house of the Duke of 
Milan, in the City of Alba, the 3d of October 1368. My 
body to be buried in the Church of the Friars Augnstines 

* Called by Dugdale <* his old concubine, daughter to one Rich- 
ard Astley, of Ullenhale, co. Warwick,** by whom he had chil- 
dren ; and as it appears he died without lawful issue, the Richard 
de Montfort named in his will must have been a natural son. Dug- 
dale, vol. i. p. 41 1. * November 6th. 

> Third son of Edward III. bom 1338, and died the 17th day 
of October 136S, at Alba Pompeia, in the Marquisate of Monfer- 
ret, in Piedmont ** poysoned as some thought." Dugdale, vol. ii. 
p. 167. 



TE8TAMENTA VETU8TA. 71 

at Clare, in the Coanty of Suffolk ; to Violenta, my wife \ 
my vestment with gold coronets ; to John de Bromwicb, Knt. 
my courser called Gerfacon ; to Richard Musard, Knt. a 
girdle of gold and a courser called Maugeneleyn ; to Bar- 
tholomew Pygot; to John de Capell, my chaplain, a girdle 
of gold, to make a chalice in memory of my soul ; and to 
the said John my best portiforium%*with musical notes; to 
Mast^ Nicholas de Haddeley a small portiforinm, without 
notes ; to John Wayte, ray chaplain, a portiforium, with 
notes ; to Thomas Waleys a circle of gold, with which my 
brother and Lord was created Prince ' ; to Edmund Mone 
the circle with which I was created Duke; to Nicholas Be« 
keonesfeld z marks a year out of the manor of Bremsfeld ; 
to Robert Bardolf. And I appoint Violenta, my wife; Bar* 
tholomew Pigot, and John de Capell, my chaplain ; and 
Sir John de Bromwich, Knightj my executors. In the pre- 
sence of Nicholas de Bekennesfeld, Robert Brad way, John 
Bray, and others. Proved before William Archbishop of 
Canterbury^ 6 ides of June* IS69, at Lambeth*. 



AGNES COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE, JUN. 
Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke^, at my house 

' Violenta, daughter of Galras PriDce of Milan, whom he mar- 
ried about five months before his death. 

« Vide Note S p. 60. 

' Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales. 

« William Wittlesey. » June 8th. 

* Royal Wills, p. 88. 

' Daughter of Roger Mortimer, first Earl of March, and wife of 
Laurence Hastings, Earl of Pembroke ; shortly aHer whose death, 
in 1348, she married John de Hakelut; who in 29 Edward lU. ob. 
tained from the King a grant of the custody of the Town and Castle 
of Pembroke, and other lands, to himself and the said Agnes, 
during the minority of John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, her 
son by her first husband ; she died 95th July 1368. Dugdale, vol. 
i- p. 577. 



72 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

in London upon the Morrow' after the Festival of St. 
Dionyse anno 1367. My body to be buried in the Church 
of the Minories without Aldgate^ London, within two days 
after my death, without any other cost than a blue cloth 
and two tapers of ten pound weight; to that convent a 
pair of candlesticks of silver and twenty marks ; to the 
Cathedral Church of St. David's one entire suit of vest- 
ments of velvet chequered ; to the Priory of Bergavenny, 
where my Lord lieth buried, a suit of vestments of green 
cloth of gold ; to John de Hastings, my son, a whole suit 
of red vestments of cloth of gold; to Joan, my daughter, 
the benefit of the marriage of Ralph de Grey stock, and 
also a bed with the furniture of her father's arms; to Eliza- 
beth Beauchamp; to Philipp. Chamberlayne; and Cathe- 
rine Countess of Warwick, my sister. 



SIR ROBERT LAUNDE, alias ATTE 
LAUNDE, KNT. 

Sir Robert Launde, alias Atte Lannde, Knt. Citizen of 
London, on our Lady's Eve« IS67. My body to be buried 
in the quire of St. Mary's, of the Charter House in Lon- 
don; to Christian my wife; to Ada Launde my mother ; to 
Robert Watfield, late my servant c /. ; to Rose Pomfret, my 
sister, of Berdfield, cxl /. ; to Richard her son and Wil- 
liam her brother; to Margaret Biernes, their sister; to 
Margaret, her sister, married to Aksted ; to Agnes, my niece, 
at Hallewell; to the high altar of Hempsted in Essex; to 
the poor there, by gift of Robert Watfield; to Joane 
Launde, of Cambridgeshire; to my noble Lady the Coun- 
tess of Norfolk ; to John Southcot, to find him at school; 
to the building of the cross in Cheapside; and 1 appoint 
Sir John Philpot, Knt. overseer of this my will. 



• October lOth. 

* Query ? September 7, the Eve of the Natmty of Our Lady. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 7^ 



SIR MICHAEL DE POYNINGS, KNT. 

Michael de Poynlngs, Knt.' Friday^ after the Feast of 
St. Matthew the Apostle 1368. My body to be buried at 
Poyaings^ near to the grave of my mother, southwards ; to 
the building of a new Church there cc marks ; to the Fri- 
ars Carmelites at Shoreham, towards the building of their 
Church XX /. ; to my heir a ruby ring, which ring is called 
the Charter of Poynings, all the furniture of my Chapel, 
and all my armour, which my father left me, also a pair of 
basyns and ewers of silver, twelve new dishes, and twelve 
saucers of silver'; to the Church of Chichester a cup of 
silver, enamelled with the arms of Arundel ; to my wife 
Joane; to Robert Botiler cxl/. and the store on my ma- 
nors of Finchani and Sidestroud in Norfolk ; to Richard, 
my son; to Margaret, my daughter cccc marks to her 
marriage'; my bondmen in Sussex to be remembered. 



ROBERT EARL OF SUFFOLK. 
Robert de UflTord, Earl of Suffolk^, on the Feast of Saint 

' Son of Sir Thomas de Pojrnings ; he was summoned to Parlia- 
ment from 16 to 42 Edward III. and died 7th March 1369, 43 
Edward III. * September 22d. 

' These bequests are given in Dugdale's abstract of this will, vol. 
ii. p. 134, but omitted in the note of it in Harl. MSS. 6148. The 
MS. however contains the legacies to the Church of Chichester 
and to Robert Botiler, who it appears from it was to have half the 
remainder of his goods with Joan his wife, which Joan was widow 
of Sir John de Molyns. 

« He was created Earl of Suffolk 16th March, 11 Edward III. 
anno 1337, and on the 18th Edward III. was appointed Admiral of 
the King*s whole fleet from the mouth of the Thames northward. 
At the battle of Poictiers, << by his signal valour and skilful conduct 
he gained to himself immortal fame, and was elected Knight of the 



74 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

Peter and Paul ' 1368. My body to be buried in the Abbey 
of Campesse in Suffolk, under the arch betwixt the high 
altar and St. Nicholas' Chapel, and I will that five square 
tapersi and four mortars besides torches shall bum about 
my corpse at my funeral; to William, my eldest son, my 
sword, which the King gave me in name of the Earldom*; 
also my bed with the eagle, and my summer vestment pow- 
dered with leopards ; to Sir Edmund d'Ufford, my dear 

brother, a cup with a cover chased with silver arms' 

to my dear sister de Brewz ; to Sir Thomas d'Ufford ; to Sir 
Edmond my cousin; Robert d'Ufford the lesser «; to Dame 
Joan de Loudham ; to Sir John de Brewz, my nephew ; to 
Giles de Brewz; to Mons' Ralf Hemenhale; to Sir Nicho- 
las Gernon a ring of gold, for a remembrance; to Mons^ 
Thomas de la Dale ; to Dame Katherine de Hemenhale ; 
Co my niece Doxen* I will that prayers be said for my ser- 
vants that died in my service, knights and others ; to the 
Lady of Ulster*, a minoress, xx marks, towards the build- 
ing at Brusyerd, and also a ring of gold, which was the 
Duke's her brother's. 



Garter soon after the foundation of the order." This eminent per- 
sonage died on Sunday next after the Feast of All Saints Nov. 4> 
1369. D.ugdale, vol. ii.p. 48. ' June 29th. 

* Or, as Dugdale states it, << the sword wherewith the King girt 
him when he created him Earl." 

* All the following bequests, excepting that to the Lady of Ul- 
ster, are oinitted in Dugdale*8 abstract, which lady is not men- 
tioned in Harleian MS. 6I4S9 from which the above is taken. 

Query? the younger, or possibly the leper. 
^ Apparently Maud, daughter of Thomas Plantagenet, Earl of 
Lancaster, and sister of Henry Duke of Lancaster ; she married, 
first, William de Burgh, Earl of Ulster ; and secondly Ralph d'Uf- 
ford, brother of Bobert Earl of Suffolk. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 75 



ROGER IXmV LA WARRE. 

Rpgper La Warre, Knt.^ at my Maaor of Wakerle^ in 
ITortbampton 28th April, 42 Edward III. 1366. Mj body 
to be buried in the Abbey of Swineshed, in the County of 
Lincoln, if I die in England, without pomp ; and I will 
that on my funeral day twenty four torches be placed 
about my corpse, and two tapers, one at my head, the 
other at my feet; and also that my best horse shall be my 
principal*, without any armour or man armed, according 
to the custom of mean people; T will that cL be distri- 
buted amongst poor people, not by penny dole, but that 
every person, whom my executors may think fit, shall have 
half a mark; also I will that all the debts of Sir John La 
Warre, my grandfather^ and the Lady Joan, his wife, and 
likewise the debts of the Lady Margaret, my mother, be 
duly paid ; to Aleanore, my wife, all the vestments, books, 
and other necessaries belonging to my chapel ; after all my 
debts and legacies be paid, I will that the remainder of my 
goods be divided into three parts, the one to be disposed of 
for the health of my soul; the second part to Aleonora, my 
wife; the third to Thomas, Edward, and John, my younger 
sons; to John, my eldest son; to Katherine, my daughter'. 
And I appoint my sons John and Thomas my executors. 
Witnessed by Sir Hugh Husee, Knt. 

* Roger Lord La Warre was summoned to Parliament in the 
S6th and 37th Edward III. ; he died 27th August 1370, aged about 
41. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 16. According to Colllns's Peerage, vol. 
viii. p. 380, for his services at the battle of Poictiers in taking John 
King of France prisoner, he obtained the crampet or chape of that 
monarch's sword as a memorial of his conduct in that exploit, and 
which he and his successors wore as an honourable augmentation to 
their ensigns. His second wife, who is mentioned in his will, 'was 
Eleanor, daughter of John Lord Mowbray ; all his song died s. p. 
and the barony passed to Reginald West, son of Sir Thomas West, 
by Joan his daughter. ^ Or Mortuary. 

Not mentioned in Dugdale's extract, but so called in the note 
of this will in the Harl. MS. whence the above is taken. 



76 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



WILLIAM LORD FERRERS, OF GROBY. 

William Ferrers, Lord of Groby *, Jane 1,1368. My 
body to be buried in the Conventual Church of our Lady 
at Ulvescroft ; to poor people and for my funeral expences 
c /. ; to the Friars at Leicester, at Maldon, at Stebninge, 
and Woodham ; 1 will that there be five tapers^ four mor- 
ters, and twenty-four torches, at my burial ; to Elizabeth, 
my daughter, a nun in the Minories, London, xx /. ; to the 
Abbess and Nuns there x marks; to Margaret, my wife *; 
to Henry, my son, my green bed, with my arms thereon ; 
to Margaret, my daughter, my white bed and all the furni- 
ture, with the arms of Ferrers and UfFord thereon ; to Phi- 
lippa de Beauchamp, my sister, a cup of silver, standing on 
three lions, with a cover, also two pattels and a salt-cellar 
of silver; to Elizabeth d'Assells, my sister, my best spice 
plate, also a tablet of silver gilt and enamelled with three 
leaves set with figures, one of the Ascension of our Lady 
in a tabernacle; Sir Ralph Basset, of Sapcoat^; Sir John 
Talbot*. Proved 14 leal. August* 1372. 



SIR BARTHOLOMEW BURGHERSH, KNT. 
Bartholomew Burghersh, Knight \ London, April 4, 1369- 

' He died on Wednesday next afler the Feast of the Epiphany 
9th January, 44 Edward III. anno 1371, having married, first, Mar-, 
garet, sister and coheir of William d*Ufford, Earl of Suffolk ; and 
secondly, Margaret, daughter of Henry de Percy, and widow of 
Gilbert Earl of Angus. Dugdale^ vol. i. p. 868. 

^ Omitted both by Dugdale, and in the abstract in Collins's Peer- 
age, vol. vi. p. 335. but copied from Harl. MSS. 6148. 

* 19th August. 

< Knight of the Garter, and one of the founders of that most 
noble order. He was summoned to Parliament from the 31st to 
the 42d Edward III. and died the 5th of April. 1369, 43 Edward III. 
Dugdale's Baronage, vol. ii. p. 36. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 77 

My body to be buried in the Chapel of Walsyngham, be- 
fore the image of the Blessed Virgin^ and thither to be car- 
ried with all speed, having one taper at the head and ano- 
ther at the feet where it rests the first night. Also I will 
that a dirige shall be there said, and in the morning a 
mass, whereat a noble shall be offered for my soul ; that 
two torches be carried along, one on one side, and the other 
on the other side, which are to be lighted at passing 
through every town, and then given to that Church wherein 
it shall rest at night. Likewise I will that the chariot in 
which it be carried shall be covered with red cendall, with 
the lion of my arms * thereon, and my helmet at the head ; 
and to every Church wherein it may rest all night the like 
cloth of cendall with my arms thereon, to be left. Also I 
will that every morning there shall be given to the poor of 
that place as much dole as my executors may think fit, and 
that on the day of my funeral no other cover be laid on my 
body than that of red cendall, with the lion of my arms, 
with my helmet, and also a taper at the head and another 
at the feet, and on each side a torch; to Margaret % my 
wife, my lands in Wiltshire and in Wales ; to Sir Walter 
Paveley a standing cup gilt with an L upon the cover, and 
also my whole suit of armour for the justs, with my coat 
of mail and sword ; to Sir John Dassels. And I appoint 
Thomas Ferrers, the aforesaid Sir Walter Paveley, Thomas 
Hungerford, John Guildburghe, and Sir William Windsor, 
my executors. Witnessed by Sir John Dassels, Sir Wil- 
liam Istell, and Sir William de Sutton. 



' The arms of Burghersh were, Gules, a lion rampant double 
quev^ Or. 

* His second wife, sister of Bartholomew Lord Badlesmere. 



78 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



KATHERINE COUNTESS OF WARWICK. 

I 

Katherine Coantess of Warwick '• Augast 4, 1369* My 
body to be buried where the Earl, my husband, shall ap- 
point. To the Earl, my husband, my goblet bound with 
gold, and those buckles of gold which I used to carry, and 
also a ring with an emerald in it ; to Thomas, my son, my 
book of ch. ; to William, my other son, a tablet of gold ; to 
Mand de Clifford, my daughter % a cup enamelled with 
dogs ; to Philippa de Stafford, my daughter % a bowl with 
a cover; to my daughter Alice* a cup of silver gilt; to 
Margaret Montfort', my daughter, the cross with the pe* 
destal in my Chapel ; to Isabel, my daughter, a cup ; to 
EKzabetb, the daughter of my son Guy, a cup ^ ; to the Con- 
vent of Friars Preachers at Worcester xx /. ; to the Friars 
Preachers of Shrewsbury xx /• ; to the Friars Minors there 
XX /• ; to the Friars Preachers of Northampton xx /. ; to 
the Friars Minors of Coventry xx /• ; to the Friars Minors 
of Litchfield xx /. And I appoint Isabel de Harley, Ralph 
Tangeley, and John Fnlvesse, my executors, and I desire 
my husband to be assisting to them in the performance of 
this my will** 



* Daughter of Roger Mortimer, first Earl of March; she died 
4th August 13699 a few months before her husband Thomas Earl of 
Warwick, whose Will will be found in the next page. 

* Wife of Roger Lord Clifford, who died 13 Richard II. 
> Wife of Hugh Earl of Stafford, K. G. 

* Married to Sir John Beauchamp, of Hache. 
s Wife of Sir Guy de Montfort. 

^ Who died v. p. Vide his will in p. 63. 

* Dugdale, vol. i. p. 934. 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 79 



THOMAS EARL OF WARWICK. 

Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick \at Chelche8ch% 
September 6> 1369- My body to be buried in the quire of 
the Collegiate Church of our Lady at Warwick. Toevary 
Church within each of my manors the best beast which 
should there be found, in satisfaction of my tithes forgotten 
and not paid ; to Thomas, my son and heir, a ring and cup 
with a cover,, the best next to that which my daughter 
Stafford may choose^ also the coat of mail sometime be* 
longing to that famous Guy of Warwick, and I will that 
all my harness, weapons, and such like habiliments be 
equally divided between my two sons Thomas and Wil* 
liam ; to my son William a ring and a cup with a cover, 
the next best to that which his elder brother may choose, 
with twenty four dishes and as many saucers of silver, and 
also two ewers and basons, with twelve pieces of silver ; to 
Isabel, my daughter, m /• to her marriage ; to Margaret, 
my daughter, a nun at Shouldham, a ring and a cup with 
a cover, and forty marks in money ; to Katherine, the 
daughter of my son Guy, a nun at Shouldham, a gold ring, 
with twenty pounds in money ; for the expences of my fu- 
neral D marks, and I desire that my executors make full 
satisfaction to every man whom I have in any sort wronged ; 
I will that my said son William have lands settled upon 
him and his heirs male of the annual value af cccc marks; 
I will that the testament of the Countess, my wife, be fully 
performed out of my goods ; I will that my executors new 
build the quire of the Collegiate Church of Warwick, 
where I order my body to be buried ; I will that masses be 
sung and alms distributed for the health of my soul, espe- 
cially at Bordesley, Worcester, and Warwick; to my 
daughter Stafford an ouche% called the eagle, which the 

' One of the founders of the Order of the Garter, and husband 
of the preceding Katharine Countess of Warwick ; an eminent 
warrior in the reign of Edward III. He died November I3> 1369* 

* Chelsea. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 233. 

> Owches, bosses, or buttons of gold. 



80 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Prince gave me, all my pearls, and a cross made of the very 
wood of our Saviour's cross, a ring with an emerald, which 
my Countess bequeathed to me, another ring which she ' 
herself may choose, a set of beads of gold with buckles 
which the Queen gave me, the choice of one of my cups of 
gold, with the silver bowl, which I always used myself, and 
likewise my best bed, with all the furniture ; to my daugh- 
ter Alice, my next best ouche, which my Lady my Coun- 
tess gave me, with a cup of gold, a set of beads, and a ring; 
to my daughter Clifford an ouche, called the eagle, which 
my son William gave me for a new year's gift, also a cup, 
a set of beads of gold, and a ring ; to my daughter Isabel, 
a cup with a ewer and cover to it gilt, and my next best 
ring, after my other daughters before remembered have 
chosen ; to the Bishop of Lincoln * a cross of gold, which 
the Lady Segrave gave me, and which had sometime be- 
longed to the good King Edward, wherein is a part of the 
very cross of Christ, and other reliques ; to my son William 
a casket of gold, with a bone of St. George, which Thomas 
Earl of Lancaster bestowed on me at my christening ; to 
Sir John Beauchamp a cross of gold, wherein part of the 
very cross of our Saviour is contained, enamelled with the 
arms of England, and also my best tilting horse; to Sir 
Roger Beauchamp a ring, the best he can choose after the 
rest which are disposed of, also my next best tilting horse ; 
to Sir Guy de Brienne a cup and a horse, the next best that 
he can choose; all the remainder of my jewels I will that 
my executors dispose of for my soul's benefit, and I ap- 
point the Earl of Stafford, Thomas and William, my sons, 
Sir Roger Beauchamp, Sir Guy de Brienne, Sir John Beau- 
champ, Sir Ralph Basset, of Sapcoat, Knights, Sir Richard 
Piriton, Governor of Northampton, Sir William Forde, Sir 
Alan Fen, Sir John Blake, Sir John iHarwood, Sir William 
Morton> and John Rous% my executors. 

^ John Buckingham was Bishop of Lincoln from 1363 to 1367i 
when he refused the bishoprick of Lichfield, as degrading, and 
died a monk of Canterbury. 

^ " All which last mentioned were priests as I conceive.** Dug- 
dale, vol. i. p. 334. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



81 



JOAN LADY COBHAM. 

Joan de Cobham, of Starburghe*. August 13, 1369. 
My body to be buried in the church-yard pf St. Mary 
Overhere, in Southwark, before the church door, where the 
image of the blessed Virgin sitteth on high over that door; 
and I will that a plain marble stone be laid over my body, 
and thereon these words : 

^u^ qui pet iti pa^^tetjr, ^ur Palme Sjoane De <(rob})am prietjr* 

% 

I will that vii thousand masses be said for my soul by 
the Canons of Tunbrugge and Tanfugge, and the four 
Orders of Friars in London, viz. the Friars Preachers, 
Minors, Augustines, and Carmelites, who for so doing 
shall have xxix/. iii^. and iwd. Also I will that on my 
funeral day twelve poor persons, clothed in black gowns 
and hoods, shall carry twelve torches ; I bequeath to the 
Church of Lyngefeld a frontpre • with the arms of Berk- 
ley and Cobham standing on white and purple ; to Re- 
ginald my son a ring with a diamond; to Sir Henry 
Grey' and Dame Joan his wife, and to that Joane my 
daughter; to Joane, daughter to that Joane. I will 
that my house in Southwark be sold to pay my Lord's 
debts % and to found prayers in the parish church of 
Langele-Borell for the souls of Sir John de la Mare, 



• Widow of Reginald Lord^ Cob|iagi^yhoj^ gd 3&^dwar^^^ 
and daughter of Sir Thomas de Berkley ; she (died October' 2a, 
1369. ■ Query? 

3 Omitted in Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. ii. p. 67, but copied ver- 
batim from Harl. MSS. 6148. Sir Henry Grey, of Codnor, mar- 
ried Johanna, daughter of Reginald Lord Cobham ; and by her 
had Richard I^ord Grey, of Codnor. It is evident that the testa- 
trix meant to describe her daughter Joan, Sir Henry Grey hus- 
band of her daughter, and her grandchild Joan their daughter. 

* Dugdale ; but it will be seen, that according to the extract in 
that work, her house in Southwark was, in a certain contingency, 
to be enfeoffed to her son, which is not noticed in the abstract in 
the manuscript just cited. 

6 



82 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

knt. some-time lord there. Sir Reginald Cobham, Sir Tho- 
mas Berkeley, and for the souls of mj benefactors. If 
Reginald my son, or any other of my heirs, shall appro- 
priate that church for the maintenance of .two priests to 
celebrate divine service there for ever, as it was intended 
and conditioned by the said Sir John de la Mare when he 
sold that lordship of Langele, with that of Lye, to my hus- 
band, in the presence of the Lord Berkley my father, then 
I will that my Executors shall enfeoife the said Reginald, 
or his heirs, in my water-mill at Edulroe Bridge, and in my 
house ac Southwark, for ever ; to Sir John Cobham * ; to 
John de Cobham, of Devonshire *. 



JOAN LADY POYNINGS. 

Joan, widow of Sir Michael Poynings, Knight*. Fri- 
day* after tie Ascension, IS69. My body to be buried in 
the church of Poynings, on the north side, near to the 
grave of my late husband; to the new building of that 
church c marks ; to Thomas my son c marks, until he be 
of full age, then to be given to the building of the said 
church; to Elizabeth my daughter a drinking-cup of 
silver, with a cover, enamelled and gilt, and also an ewer 
of the same ; to Richard, my other son, two vases and two 
ewers of silver; and also to the said Richard and Thomas, 
my sons, and to Agnes Bardolf, my daughter*, four pieces 
of silver, of one suit. 

I Omitted by Dugdale. 

* She first married Sir John de Molyns ; and, secondly, Sir Mi- 
chael Poynings, and died 16th May following the date of her will. 
Dugdale, vol. iL p. 134. ' May I Itb. 

* In Dugdale's Abstract merely << Agnes, my daughter;" but a 
note of this will in Harl. MSS. 6148, has it as above, and which is 
correct ; for it appears that William Lord Bardolf was ward to Sir 
Michael Poynings, the husband of this Joan, 40 Edward III. with 
the intent Uiat he should marry his daughter Agnes, and which 
marriage is stated in most pedigrees to have taken place, and 
that he had issue by her. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 68^ . 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, 83 



SIR JOHN DELVES, KNT. 

John Delves, Knigbt, at Dodington, August l6th, ld69. 
My body to be buried in St. Jaities Church of Audley. To 
Isabel, my wife; to Henry Delves, my brother, and John, 
his son, my plate, which belonged to Guy de Brian, also 
that which belonged to John de Hawkstone; to Joan, my 
daughter, late wife to Henry de Kymes, my manors of 
Dodington, Weston, Hegh, and Coldworton, my manors 
in Warwick and Stafford, and my lands in North Wales. 



DAME MAUD DE SAY. 

Dame Maud, which was late the wife of Sir Geoffrey 
Say ', at Bermondsey, Tuesday • next after the Feast of the 
Apostles Simon and Jude, 1369. My body to be buried in 
thfe Church of the Friars Preachers of London, near Ed- 
mond my loving husband ; to tlie Friars there x pounds, 
and I desire that no feast be made on my funeral day, but 
that immediately after my decease my corpse shall be car- 
ried to burial, covered only with a linen cloth, having a 
red cross thereon, with two tapers, one at the head and 
another at the feet, and I charge my son, William- de Say, 
that he do nothing contrary thereto; to John, my son', 
xl/.; to John de Harleston my French and Latin books; 
to every esquire of my retinue*; to William de Say, my 
don. 



' Widow of Greoffirey Lord Say> Admiral of the King's Fleet, who 
died 33 Edward III. and daughter of Guy Earl of Warwick. Ed- 
mund, mentioned in her will, was her second husband, but his 
surname does not appear. 

« SOth October. 

3 Omitted in Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 512, but retained in 
Harl. MSS.6I4d. < Ibid. 

G 2 



84 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



WILLIAM VAUX. 

. Wiljiam Vaux, of Maidstoae \ September lOtb, 1368. 
My body to be buried in that Church. John Vaux, my 
father; Isabel, my mother; William Vaux, my grandfather; 
and Joane, my grandmother. 



THOMAS PERCY, BISHOP OF NORWICH. 

Thomas Percy, Bishop of Norwich, 25th May, 1368*. 
To Sir Thomas Percy and Sir Henry Percy, my nephews ' ; 
to Dame Margaret de Ferrers, my sister*; to Maud Nevill, 
my sister^; to William d'Aton, my nephew*; to Sir Edward 
St. John; to Lady Wingfield. Proved. 17th November 
1369- 



* Probably descended frond the baronial family of Vaux or Val- 
libus, mentioned by Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 596. 

* Son of Henry Lord Percy. He was consecrated Bishop of 
Norwich by the Pope on the 3d of January 1355, though then only 
22 years of age. He died at Blofield August 8, 1369. His will, 
of which the above is an extract taken from Harl. MSS. 6148, is 
said to be very curious^ and is preserved in the Register of Arch- 
bishop Whytesley at Lambeth, fol. 105 b. Collins* Peerage, vol. ii. 
p. 313. 

> Sons of his brother I^rd Percy ; Henry was the first .Earl of 
Northumberland of this family ; and Thomas was created Earl of 
Worcester, was a K. G. and beheaded in 1403. 

• Wife of William Lord Ferrers of Groby, and widow of Robert 
de Umfreville. Vide her will in a subsequent page. 

« Wife of Lord Nevill, of Raby, K. G. and mother of Ralph Ne- 
vill, first Earl of Westmoreland, K. G. 

• Son of his sister Isabel, ^ife of William D'Aton. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 85 



SIR WALTER MANNEY, KNT. 

Sir Walter Lord of Manney, Koight ', London^ St. An- 
drew's Day% 1371. My body to be buried at God'8 plea- 
sure, but if it may be in the midst of the Quire of the Car- 
thusians, called Our Lady, near West Smithfield, in the 
suburbs of London, of my foundation, but without any 
great pomp; and I will that my Executors cause twenty 
masses to be said for my soul, and that every poor person 
coming to my funeral shall have a penny, to pray for me 
and for the remission of my sins; to Mary, my sister, a 
nun, X pounds'; to my two bastard daughters, nuns, viz. 
to Mailosel and Malplesant, the one cc franks, the other 
c franks; to Cishbert, my cousin*; to Margaret Mare- 
schall^, my dear wife, my plate which I bought of Robert 
Francis; also a girdle of gold, and a hook for a mantle, 
and likewise a garter of gold*, with all my girdles and 
knives, all my beds and dossers in my wardrobe, excepting 
my folding bed, paly of blue and red, which I bequeath 

* He was a Knight of the Garter, and having been summoned to 
Parliament from the ^Ist to the 44th of Edward III. died on 
Thursday next afler the Feast of St. Hillary, i. e.^Oth January, 46 
Edward III. * November SOth. 

' Dugdale*s Abstract of this will, vol. ii. p. 150, differs consider- 
ably from a note of it in Harl. MSS. 6148 ; in the latter the be- 
quest to his sister is omitted, and instead of mentioning Mailosel 
and Malplesant as his two bastard daughters^ they are there de- 
scribed as his two " neveux bastards de Manny.'* It is not impro- 
bable that Dugdale, from finding that in pedigrees he had two 
illegitimate daughters so named, who were nuns, thought it best so 
to call them in his abstract of Lord Manney*s will. 

« Also omitted by Dugdale. 

^ Lord Manny married Margaret, the daughter and heiress of 
Thomas de Brotherton (younger son of King Edward the First), 
Earl Marshal, and widow of Lord Segrave. Dugdale merely calls 
her <' Margaret his wife,*' but she is styled as in the text in the 
MS. just cited. 

* Evidently the Garter which he wore as Knight of that Order. 



86 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

to my daugbter of Pembroke ' ; and I will also that my said 
wife have all the goods which I purchased of Lord Se- 
grave and the Countess Marshall Also I will that a tomb 
of alabaster, with my image as a knight, and my arms 
thereon, shall be made for nie, like unto that of Sir John 
Beauchamp in Paul's, in London. I will that prayers be ' 
said for me, and for Alice de Henalt, Countess Marshal'. 
And whereas the King oweth me an old debt of a thou- 
sand pounds, by bills of his wardrobe, J will that, if it can 
be obtained, it shall be given to the Prior and Monks of 
the Charter-'house^. And whereas there is due to me from 
the Prince, from the time he had been Prince of Wales, 
the sum of c marks per annum, for my salary as Governor 
of Hardelagh Castle, I bequeath one half thereof to the 
said Prior and Monks of the Charter-bouse before men- 
tioned, and the other half to the Executors of my Will*. 
To my wife, and my daughter Pembroke, the fifteen in 
florins of gold, and five *' vesseux estutes ph V which Duke 
Albert oweth me by obligation?; to Sir Guy Bryan^ Knt. 
my best chains, whom I also appoint my Executor. 



■ Ann his daughter, by Margaret Plantagenet, married John 
Hastings, Earl of Pembroke. 

• Lord Segrave was his wife's first husband ; the Countess Mar- 
shall might mean his wife when that nobleman*s widow, but it 
most likely referred to Mary, the widow of her father, Thomas 
Earl of Norfolk and Earl Marshal. One of the Harl. MSS. con- 
tains the following note : " Sir Peter de Brewz, Sir John de 
Brewz, and Thomas Morieux, had administration of the goods of 
Mary C(^untess of Norfolk, Marshal of England, 7th June 1363." 
She was the daughter of William Lord Roos, and widow of Wil- 
Ham Lord Braose. After the death pf the Earl she married, 
thirdly. Sir Ralph Cobham, Knt- and died 36 Edward IIL 136^. 
Dagdale, vol. i. p. 64. 

« Sic in the MS. above referred to, but omitted in Dugdale*s Ab- 
stract. It probably meant Alice de Halys, first wife of Thomas 
Earl of Norfolk, and his wife's mother. 

* Omitted in the MS. before referred to. * Ibid. 
« Sic in the MS. 

7 This clause is entirely omitted in Dugdale's Abstract : as Lord 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 8? 



THOMAS EARL OF OXFORD. 

Thomas Vere, Earl of Oxford, and Chamberlain of 
England * ; at Bentley, Friday, August 1, 137 1 . My body to 
be buried in thp Priory of Colne, on the north side, in th e 
Chapel of St. Peter, and for my funeral expenses cxxxiii /• 
Yis. viii d. To Maud, my wife, all my reliques now in my 
own keeping, and a cross made of the very wood of 
Christ's cross, and also all the furniture of my chapel ; to 
Robert, my son, two basons of silver; to Sir Alberic de 
Vere, my brother, a coat of mail which Sir William de 
Wingfield gave me; also a new helmet and a pair of 
gauntlets; to Dame Joane de Wingfield*; to Sir John 
Pelham ' ; to John de Hawkwood xx marks, and I appoint 
the before-named persons my Executors. 



JOHN EARL OF PEMBROKE. 

John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke % London, 5th 
May, 1372. My body to be buried in the Church of St. 
Paul's, London, where a tomb is to be made for me near 
the wall on the north side, which tomb I will be made as 
like as possible to the tomb of Elizabeth de Burgh who lies in 
the Minories, London, without Aldgate, and I give for the 



Manily served in the Low Countries in the early part of the reign 
of Edward III. this debt was probably then contracted. 

■ He died 45 Edward HI. leaving by Maud, his wife, daughter 
of Sir Ralph de UfFord, Knt Robert Earl of Oxford, afterwards 
created Marquess of Dublin and Duke of Ireland, and a Knight of 
the Garter, the celebrated favourite of Richard II. 

* Omitted in Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i.p. 193, but copied from 
one of the Harl, MSS. ' Ibid. 

* Knight of the Garter ; he died on the road to Calais on the 
16th of April 1376. He made another will, which see in a subse- 
quent page. 



88 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

making the said tomb cxl /t.; for my funeral expenees, and 
to the poor that day ccc li. or more, according to the will of 
my executors ; to the Charter-house, London, beyond New- 
gate, the remainder of the sum of cccc/. which I have in part 
granted to that house in fulfilment of a vow I made in 
Guienne; Ann, my dear wife*. And I appoint the Reve- 
rend Father in God William Bishop of Winchester*, Henry 
Lord Percy, Sir Walter Amy as. Sir John deBarowe, Clerk, 
Ralph de Walsham, and Thomelyn Crickelade, my Exe- 
cutors* Also I will that the money which I hold from 
my Lady and mother, on whom God have mercy, be distri- 
buted for the health of her soul *. Proved l6th kal. Au- 
gust' 1376. 



ROBERT TWIFORD. 

Robert Twiford the younger, son of Sir Ralph Twiford, 
Knt. 6th May 1372. To Sir Robert, my uncle. 



SIR ROBERT THORPE, KNT. 

Robert de Thorpe, Knt. Chancellor of England «, June 
29ih, 1372. I appoint Sir John Knevet, Knt. John Har- 
leston. Clerk, and John de Breton, my Executors. 



' Daughter of Sir Walter Lord Manny, K. G. Vide his will in 
page 85. 

* William of Wykeham. 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 92. ' 17th August. 
« He was appointed Lord High Chancellor of England 26th 

March 1372, and was succeeded in July 1373 by Sir John Knyvet, 
probably the same person whom he appoints one of his executors. 
Beatson's Political Index, vol. i. p. 322. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 89 



HUMPHREY EARL OF HEREFORD. 

Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, of Essex, and of 
NortbamptOD, and Constable of England *, at Plessy, De- 
cember 12th, 1372. First, I bequeath my soul to God, all 
powerful, to the Blessed Virgin St. Mary, and to all the 
Saints of Heaven, and my body to be buried in the Church 
of the Abbey of Walden. And I bequeath all my goods 
and chattels, alive or dead, moveable or immoveable, to 
Simon, by the grace of God, Bishop of London *, Mons^ 
Guy de Bryan, Monsr John de Moulton, Mons' Robert de 
Tye, John de Gyldesburgh, and to Sir Ph. de Melreth, to 
bury my body, and for the payment of my debts, and those 
of my most honored Lord and father, on whom God have 
mercy ; the residue of my goods and chattels to be appro«- 
priated for the benefit of my soul, and for the souls of those 
for whom I am bound, according to the disposition of the 
aforesaid Bishop, Monsr Guy, Mons*" John, Mons' Robert, 
John, and Philip, whom I appoint executors of this my 
will ; and Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey'; Johanna, 
my dear ^ife^; and Adam Franceys, Citizen of London, 
supervisors thereof*. Proved before William Wittlesey, 
Archbishop of Canterbury, at Lanibeth, id. of May* 1373. 



SIR ROGER DIGGE, KNT. 
Roger Digge, Friday after St. Thomas' Day*, 48 Edward 

■ Son and heir of William, de Bohun^ Earl of Northampton ; and 
on the death of his uncle Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, 
&c. 8. p. he succeeded to his honours. Knight of the Garter. 
Dugdale says, vol. i. p. 186, that he died on the 16 calends Febru- 
ary, 46 Edward III. viz. January 17th, 1373. 

* Simon Sudbury, afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury. 

> Knight of the Garter; his father-in-law, who died 1375. 

* Daughter of Richard Earl of Arundel just mentioned. 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 57- » 15th May. 

* Query? St. Thomas of Canterbury, viz. December 29th, tlie 
Friday after which, in 48 Edward III. was 5th January 1375. 



90 TESTAMENT A VETU8TA. 

II F. My body to be buried io Dereham Church, or in the 
Church-yard. I will that my executors found a chauntry 
for the soul of my Lord the King, for my soul, and for the 
souls of Thomas Triller, Bishop of Rochester \ and my pa- 
rents and benefactors ; to William Kirkby and Agnes his 
wife, to marry their children, all the lands which I bought 
at Feukham and Derme, of Roger Kirkby ; I will my lands 
in Chepsted, after the death of Alice, wife of John Solis, to 
the heirs of the body of the said Alice; James de Peckham, 
my feoffee; to Simou Mouin, and EUen^ his wife, my sis- 
ters, my silver girdle; to Nicholas Allcroach one silver cup 
and cover; and to Joan, his wife, my cousin, one ring. 



MARGARET LADY FERRERS. 

Margaret, widow of Sir William de Ferrers, Lord of 
Groby«, April 86, 1374. To Sir Ingram P'Umfraville, a 
cup of gold, marked with the arms of Percy and Ferrers. 
Witnessed by Sir Ingram D'Umfreville, Knt. and John 
Botiler, of Toleshurst '. 



JOHN EARL OF PEMBROKE. 

. John Hastings, Earl of Pembroke ^ Palm Sunday « 1374. 
My body to be buried in the quire before the great altar of 

* Thomas Trilleck, Dean of St. PauPs, was Bishop of Rochester 
from ]364tol372. 

* She was the daughter of Henry Lord Percy ; and married, 
first, Gilbert d*Umfrcville, Earl of Angus ; she died on the Feast 
of the Nativity of Our Lady, September 8, 1375, 49 Edward IH. 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 268. 

' Omitted in Dugdale's Abstract. 

« This was his second will. Vide the former, page 87- 

* March 26th. 



TESTAMENTA VETU9TA. Ql 

the Monastery of the Friars Preachers of Hereford, 1 will 
that my servants, especially those who underwent much 
labour with me in the Kingdoms of Castile and France », be 
rewarded by my executors. And I appoint Walter Arayas, 
Ralph de Walsham, and those named in my former will 
writteti in England, my executors. Witnessed by Mau- 
rice Wych, Friar Alexander Bacbe, my confessor, Thomas 
More, Walter Atte Watere, John Guybon, Stephen Ha- 
meae, and oth^rq ♦. Proved before Simon Arcbbidbop of 
Canterbury, 16 kalends Nov. 1376. 



ANNE LADY MALTRAVERS. 

Ann Maltravers*, in the parish of St. John Zachary, 
London, Sunday, February 18th, 1374'. My body to be 



' Dugdale states, vol. i. p. 577} that being at the request of tlie 
Gascoigns and Polctovins appointed Lieutenant of Acquitaine 46 
Edward III. then about ^5 years of age^ he arrived at the Port of 
Rochelle the day before the Eve of St. John the Baptist, which 
place was besieged by the French, but being suddenly attacked by 
the Spanish fleet he was taken prisoner ; and af^er having under- 
gone FOUR YBARS imprisonment in Spain, and suffering the most 
inhuman treatment, he was sent to Paris, where he fell so seriously 
ill, supposed from poison administered by the Spaniards, that the 
French, from eagerness to obtain his ransom before his death, has- 
tened his journey to Calais, and that he died before he reached 
that place, on the 16th of April, but without mentioning the year, 
which it would appear was the 49th Edward III. 1375. If how- 
ever the statement of his having been four years a prisoner be cor- 
rect, he must have died on the 16th April 1376, and which the date 
of the probate of his will, October 17th, 1376, supports. 

* Printed at length in the " Royal Wills," p. 95. 

* Dugdale calls her Agnes, and says she was second wife of John 
Lord Maltravers, who died 38 Edward III. and the widow, first, of 
John de Argentine, and then of John de Nerford ; but a note to the 
MS. abstract of this will in the British Museum, calls her << daughter 
and heir of Hereford, and after wife to John de Argentine." 

5 1374-5. 



92 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, 

buried in the Charch of Our Lady in Lychet Matravers, 
near to the grave of my Lord if I depart out of this life in 
the Counties of Dorset or Wilts ; but if it so happen that 
I die in Hertfordshire or Cambridgeshire, then I will that 
my body be buried in the Priory of Wylmundley, and that 
every priest who shall say mass at my funeral be rewarded 
according to the discretion of my executors, and that no 
cloth of gold be put upon my corpse, nor any more than 
five tapers, each weighing five pounds, be put about it ; to 
the Church at Lychet Matravers xls. ; to John, my son, a 
dozer of green, powdered with dolphins, with four ccusters 
of the same suit; also my great cup with a cover, one 
dragenall, six dishes, six pottengers, six saucers, two 
pitchers, two pottels, all of silver, but after his decease I 
will that all the said articles remain to the Priory of Wyl- 
mundley ; to Margaret, his wife ', a tablet of espicerie ; to 
Eleanor, wife to Sir • • • . Arundell ; to Yvon Fitzwarine 
and Dame Maud, his wife, my daughter ; to Sir Baldwin 
St. George and Dame Elizabeth, his wife, my daughter ; 
to my Lord the Earl of Arundel, to be aiding to my exe- 
ecutors; to William Evesfeld, my nephew; to Reginald 
Maltravers ; Payne Mohun. 



THOMAS LORD POYNINGS. 

Thomas Lord Poynings % Slagham, St. Simon and St. 
Jude's Day», 48 Edward III. 1374. My body to be buried 
in the midst of the quireof the Abbey of St. Radegunds, in 
Kent, which is of my foundation, before the high altar. I 

* Omitted in the manuscript, but sic in Dugdale*s note of this 
will, vol. ii. p. 10^ ; he however omits all the following persons. 
It is to be remarked that there is great discrepancy in the pedi* 
grees of the family of Maltravers, of Lytchet Maltraver^. Hutchins, 
in his History of Dorset, considers that Dugdale's account of it is 
not drawn up with his usual accuracy. Vide Banks* Dormant and 
Extinct Peerage, vol. ii. p. 334, for some pertinent remarks on the 
subject of that family. 

> He died 49 Edward III. s. p. ' October 28. 



TBSTAM£NTA VETUSTA. 93 

« 

will that a tomb be made, with the image of an armed 
knight thereoQ of alabaster. To that Abbey c L part for 
the making of the said tomb, and the remainder to be dis-!> 
posed of in masses and prayers for my soul ; to Blanch de 
Mowbray % my wife, the third part of my goods, with all 
my plate and household stu£f, excepting two cups of gold, 
one of which 1 bequeath to Lady Bardolf, my sister, and 
the other to Lady D'Aton % my sister ; to Richard, my 
brother, twelve dishes and twelves sauces of silver, with 
all my armour; I will that ten annets and trentals of 
Gregorie be sung in the Churches of Poynings and 
Slagham, within one year after my death ; Sir Arnold Sa- 
vage 3, my feoffee ; and I appoint Sir William Eglington, 
Hugh Waterton; and John >iewmarche; my Executors. 



ELEANOR LADY SAVAGE. 

Eleanor, widow of Sir Arnold Savage, Knt. October 8tfa, 
1374. My body to be buried in the Chancel of the Priory 
Church of Wallingford, where my Lord's body lieth. To 
the College within that Castle, for a gravestone, x/.; to 
Arnold, my son ; to Eleanor ; to Margaret Lottwik, 
Foliambe ; to Roger Norwood, that married my daughter. 



SIR WILLIAM TAUNK, KNT. 

William Taunk, Knt. * Friday », St. Thomas the Martyr, 
49th Edward III. 1375. My body to be buried in the 

• She married, secondly, Sir John de Wrothe, Knt. 

« Sic in HarL MSB. 6148. but « Dacom," in Dugdale's abstract 
of this will, vol. ii. p. 135. 
' This and the subsequent persons are omitted by Dugdale. 

* He was Chief Baron of the Exchequer from February Sd, 1375, 
to November 12th, 1376, when he probably died. Beatsoo, how- 
ever, calls him William Tarks. Political Index, vol. ii. p. SOT* 

^ Query before ? as the Feast of Su Thomas k Becket, viz^ the 
89th of November^ fell in 1375 on a Saturday. 



94 TBSTAMENTA VfiTUSTA. 

Charch of St. Peter's of Hdunton, where my tomb is ttaade, 
by Isabel, my wife ; for my funeral xx /. ; to Alice, now 
my wife, a . . . . which Lady Brewz gave to my son ; to 
Robert, my son ; to William, my son ; to Richard, my 
son; to John Taunk, my brother, the marriage oF John, 
the cousin and heir of Lawrence de Pageham ; to Isabel, 
tny daughter; to Robert, my son. 



RICHARD EARL OF ARUNDEL. 

Richard Earl of Arundel Md Surrey \ at Arundel Castle, 
December 5, 1375. My body to be buried in the Chapter- 
house of the Priory at (icwes, near to the tomb of Eleanor 
de Lancaster*, my wife; and I desire that my tomb be no 
higher than hers ; that no men at arms, horses, hearse, or 
other pomp, be used at my funeral, but only five torches, 
with their morters, as was about the corpse of my wife, be al- 
lowed ; and that no more than d marks be expended thereon. 
To purchase lands and rents for th^ Monks of Lewes cc /. 
otherwise, that one or two churches be appropriated to that 
Monastery, for the maintenance of two Monks to celebrate 
two masses perpetually every day for the souls of my 
father and mother, my.tvife, and my children and succes- 
sors, and all Christian people, in the Chapel of St. Thomas 
the Martyr in that house, or else in the Chapel of Our 
Lady on the north of the great Church ; the one mass to 
be that of Our Lady, and the other of the Holy Ghost. 
And I will that every. Prior of that bouse, on his first en- 
trance on his government, shall swear to see the same 

punctually performed. Likewise I bequeath m marks to 

——»»»—— ——i^—^^ I « ^^— ^»»— — — .^i—— i-p^».— — ^— —— »— ^— » 

' Knight of the Garter ; he died 9 kalends of February, January 
24th, 1376. 

' Daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster, and second 
cousin of King Edward III. ; she married, first, John Lord Beau- 
mont, and was the second wife of Richard Earl of Arundel, he 
having repudiated his first wife Isabel, daughter of Hugh le De- 
spencer. His only issue by Isabel le Despencer was a daughter 
Philippa, who married Sir Richard Seijeaux, of Cornwall, Knt. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 95 

purchase lands of the ahDual value of cvii marks^ fot the 
maintenance of «ix Priests and three Choristers, to cele- 
brate divine service every day by note, in the Chapel of 
my Castle of Arundel, and to pray for the souls of my 
father and mother, my wife end children, their successors, 
and all Christians ; I will that they rise tBvery day in sum- 
mer at sun-rising, and in winter at break of the day, to 
their matins by note; and they are also to perform their 
masses, high and low, and other divine services, according 
to the direction o( my Executors. To purchase xx /. rent 
for the poor of my counties of Sussex and Salop, ccoc 
marks, with the fulfilment of which I charge Richard, my 
son ' ; to my son, Thomas Bishop of Ely ^, two m marks ; 
to John, my son% five m marks, with all the stock upon 
my lands at my decease ; to Joane *, my daughter^ 
two M marks; to Alice 5, my daughter, three m marks; 
to the eldest daughter of my said son John, one m marks ; 
to Henry and Edward, the younger sons of my said son 
John, D marks each ; to William, another son of my said 
son John, d marks ; to my nephews and nieces, sons and 
daughters of Sir Roger le Strange, and to my sister. Dame 

* This bequest is omitted in Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 315. 

* He was consecrated Bishop of Ely in 1374 ; translated to York 
in 1388^ and became Archbishop of Canterbury on the death of 
Archbishop Courtney in 1396. He died in 1414. 

• ' His second son, who, by marrying Eleanor, the grand-daughter 
and heiress of John Lord Maltravers, acquired that Barony. His 
grandson John succeeded Thomas Earl of Arundel in the Castle, 
and consequently Earldom of Arundel. In Banks* Dormant and 
Extinct Peerage is the following remark on the John Earl of Arun- 
del last mentioned : << The title of Earl is not attributed to this 
John, although he succeeded to the possession of Arundel Castle, 
and the tenure of the Castle was determined afterwards to consti- 
tute the Earldom without any form, patent, or creation whatso- 
ever, temp. Henry VI." It will, however, be seen by the will of 
Eleanor, widow of the John Fitz-Alan in question, in a following 
page, that she styles herself ** Countess of Arundel," and speaks of 
her « late husband John Earl of Arundel.*' 

* Wife of Humphrey Bohun, K. G. Earl of Hereford. 

* She married Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, in the 38th Ed- 
ward III. 



96 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Alaine le Strange, wife to the said Roger, md marks, over 
and above m marks more paid to them already; to 
Richard, my son and heir S my best coronet, and I charge 
him on my blessing to keep it during his life, and then to 
leave it to his heir, and so to remain from heir to heir, 
Lords of Arundel, in remembrance of me; to Joane, my 
daughter, my second coronet, with the like charge, and to 
Alice, my daughter, my third coronet, on the same con- 
ditions*; to John, my son, my house in London, called 
Bermondsey Inn, near Fish Wharf; to my dear uncle. Sir 
John Arundell ; I will that my Executors pay ccclx marks 
to William Skinner, for the Abbot of Hagemont, which 
he oweth to him ; to Joane, my daughter. Countess of 
Hereford ; to Sir Hugh de Segrave; to Sir Guy de Bri.an ; 
to Sir Edward St. John five hundred marks, to be painful 
in the execution of my will^ and to be good to my children. 



SIR WILLIAM DE COBHAM, KNT. 

William de Cobham, Knight, the Friday on the Exalta- 
tion of the Holy Cross, 1373. My body to be buried in 
St. Catherine's Church, at Cherelewood ; to Alice, my wife; 
Co the Parson of Penshurst. And I appoint Ralf Cobham, 
my brother, my Executor. 



THOMAS DE COGGESHALL. 

Thomas de Coggeshall, October 8th, 1375. My body 
to be buried in the Church of St. Mary's of Coggeshall. 
To Joane, my daughter; to Sir Henry de Coggeshall, 
Knight. And I appoint Thomas, my brother, and Henry 
Frank, Parson of Hakwell, my Executors. 

* Who succeeded his father in the Earldom. 

* The bequests of his second and third best coronets to his 
daughters Joane and Alice, probably arose from their both being 
Countesses, and consequently entitled to wear them. Vide notes 
« and ^ in the last page. 

* This and the following bequests are omitted by Dugdale. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 97 



KATHERINE LADY PEVERELL. 

Katherine, wife of Sir Andrew Peverell, Knight *, Sun- 
day* next after St. Luke, 1375. My body to be buried in 
the Monastery of Lewes, if it so pleaseth the Prior thereof. 
To Andrew Peverell, cousin to my Lord; to the Earl of 
Aruqdel, my brother; to Sir Richard, his son, my nephew; 
Henry Huse, late my husband. And I appoint the Prior of 
Lewes my Executor. 



PETER DE LACY. 

Peter de Lacy, at London, o& the Feast of St. Michael', 
1375. My body to be buried in the chancel of the Church 
of Northfiete. I appoint Peter de Lacy, Parson there, and 
Micholas de Lacy, Parson of Brad well, my Executors. 



SIR WILLIAM SAY, KNT. 

William Say, Knight, at Reysham, in Kent, February I, 
49th Edward III. 1375. My goods there, and in the 
County of Sussex and Hertford. 



' She was the daughter of Richard third Earl, and sister of £d- 
mond fourth Earl of ArundeL Dugdale omits any mention of her 
in his account of the Earls of Arundel. Under the Barony of 
Hoese, vol. i. p. 633^ he states, that Henry Hoese, who was in the 
wars of Scotland in the 7 th and 9th Edward III. on the marriage 
of his eldest son Henry, in the 21st of that reign, settled the 
manor of Morton upon him and his issue, failing which, on Richard 
his second son, with remainder to the issue of his own body by 
Katherine^ then his mfe > and that he died July 2 1 st, 23 Edward HI. 
1349. It is pretty evident that the testator was the Katherine there 
mentioned. 

* October 21 St. ^ September 29th. 

H 



98 T£dTAM£KTA VETUSTA. 



SIR THOMAS DE ST. NICHOLAS, KNT. 

Thomas de St. Nicholas, Knt. Wednesday the Feast of 
St. Peter ad Vincula', 1375. My body to be buried in 
the Church of St. Mary Minster, in Tbanet, before the 
great cross; to Alice, my wife's sister; to Elizabeth and 
Agnes, my daughters; to Elizabeth, my wife; to Law- 
rence, my son. 



SIR NICHOLAS DE LOVAINE, KNT. 

Sir Nicholas de Lovayne, Knight, September 20tb, 
137.^. My body to be buried in the Abbey Church of 
Penshurst, otherwise in the Abbey of our Lady Grace, id 
London, near the Tower. I will that the furniture of my 
sepulture be all of black drap de layne, and that my hel- 
met be placed at the head of my corpse, with my shield of 
arms and my swprd ; to Margaret, my wife'; to Nicholas^ 
my son, three m marks, of the debt which the King owetb 
mCf and whereof he hath tallies; to Margaret, my daugh- 
ter; to John Lord Beaumont, a . . . . which my wife gave 
me; to the Honourable Lady Mohun; to Sir Aubrey de 
Vere, brother to my said wife, a cup with a cover; to Sir 
Edward Berkley; to Sir John Pekbrugge; to Sir Reginald 
de Molines, my cousin, a silver cup and cover marked 
with my arms; to Sir Bernard Brocas; to Sir Edward St. 
John ; to Sir Robert Belknap. I will that prayers be said 
for the soul of Dame Katherine St. John^ and Roger her 



' August 1st. 

• She was daughter of John de Vere, seventh Earl of Oxford, 
and married, first, Henry Lord Beaumont, by whom she had John 
Lord Beaumont, mentioned in the above will ; secondly. Sir Ni- 
cholas deLouvaine, of Penshurst, in Kent; and thirdly, Sir John 
Devereux, Knt. Collins* Peerage, vol. vi. p. 2 ; and Dugdale's Ba- 
ronage, vol. ii. p. 53. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 99 

soni whose inheritance I have gotten; my Manors of 
Ospring and 2^nesfeld, in Kent, and Chevele Ditton and 
CamoySy in Cambridgeshire ; my heir male, now under 
age. Whereas I have agreed with all the heirs of Poult- 
ney but one, who is under age; to Maud', my wife, an 
annuity of x/. ; my brother Nicholas. I will also that 
prayers be said for Sir William Poultney, and others that 
I am bound to. To my brother, John Pekbrugge, the 
reversion of the manor of SwaflFham, in the County of 
Cambridge, after the death of Margaret, my sister; to Sir 
Aubrey de Vere the manor of Ditton, paying c /. 



EDWARD LORD DESPENCER. 

Edward Lord Despenser*, Lord of Glamorgan and Mor- 
gannock, at my manor of Lanblethian, November 6, 1375. 
My body to be buried in the Abbey of Tewksbury, on the 
south side, near to the bodies of my ancestors. To the 
Abbot and Convent of Tewksbury, one whole suit of my 
best vestments, also two gilt chalices, and one gilt hanap ; 
likewise a ewer, wherein to put the body of Christ on 
Corpus Christi day, which was given to me by the King 
of France ; to Elizabeth, my wife % my great bed of blue 
camaka with griffins ; also another bed of camaka, striped 
with white and black, with all the furniture thereto belong- 
ing; to Sir Ralf de Ferrers ^ my uncle; to Sir John 



* Probably an error of the person who copied it into Harl. MSS. 
6148, whence the abstract of this will is taken. 

* Knight of the Garter. He was summoned to Parliament from 
31 to 39 Edward III. inclusive, and died at his Castle of Cardiff on 
Martinmas Day, Nov. 11th, 1375. 

* Daughter of Bartholomew de Burghersh. Vide her will in a 
subsequent page. 

* Apparently brother of his mother Ann, daughter of Henry 
Lord Ferrers of Groby. This and following names are omitted in 
Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 396. 

H 52 



100 TE8tAMENtA VETUSTA. 

D'OdibgselU my black coufdei^ And I appoint Sir Jobn 
D'Aunsey, Sir Jobn FallesIC) Sir Edward Delinggrigge, 
Knt. niy Executors. 



mMm 



MARY COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. 

Mary de St. Paul', Countess of Pembroke, Lady of 
Wriffbrd " and of Montenac, at my Manor of Braxsted, in 
Essex, March 13, 1376*. My body to be buried in the 
Church of the Sisters of Denny ^ in the heart thereof, where 
my tomb is made. Sir Aymer de Valence, my late Lord, 
who Heth buried in the Abbey of Westminster, and to 
whom I was executrix; to that Church a cross with a foot 
of gold and emeralds, which Sir William de Valence, Knt. 
brought from the Holy LanJi. My nephew, Sir Aymer de 
Assels. And I appoint Sir John Knevit, Knt. Sir Arnold 
Pinkney, and Sir John Shaftesbury, my Executors. 



JOHN KIRRIEL. 

John Kirriel, son of Sir Nicholas Kirriel, late Knight. 
In the Diocese of Canterbury, Monday » next after the Feast 
of St. Andrew, 1376. I bequeath c marks for the expenses 
of my burial. To Lettice, my wife; to Sir Stephen Va- 
lence; to Sir Peter, Prior of Horton. And I appoint my 
son, Nicholas Kirriel, my Executor. 



' She was third wife of Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, 
who died in 1393, and daughter pf Guy de Chastilian, Earl of St. 
Paul. It is probable that she died very aged. 

* Weysford, in Dugdale, vol. i. p. 778. ' Query, 1376-7? 

* In Cambridgeshire, which was of her foundation. 

* December 6th. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 101 



PHILIPPA COUNTESS OF MARCH. 

Philippa de Mortimer Countess of March, at Plomes- 
tede', November 31, 1378. My body to be buried \n the 
Convfentual Cburcb of the Holy Trinity, in the Priory of 
Bustelesbam Montagu. I bequeath to the 9ai4 Churcb of 
Bustlesham all the furniture of my Chapel, vestments, 
books, chalices, &c. the use of the altar of St. Anne, befor^ 
which altar my body shall be buried, in the second arch, 
near the body of my honoured Lord and father, on whom 
God have mercy, excepting my best vestment with three 
*' capes," which I devise to the Abbey of Wigpoiore, and 
my white vestment, which I bequeath to the House of 
Lyngbrok. Tq the said alt^r of St. Apne a tablet of the 
best gold, which I bought of John Paplyn; also for the us^ 
of the said altar two batons of silver, enamelled with the 
arms pf Mortimer and Montagu ; to £dmond^ my son, a 
bed, JBcc. also a gold ring, with a piece of the true cross, 
with thi9 writing, '' In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus 
Sancti. Amen." and which I charge him on my blessing to 
keep; likewise a cup of silver with an escutcheon of the 
arms of Mortimer. And I require you my very dear son, 
from the great trust which I have, and ought reasonably to 
have in you, that on my blessing you will not disturb. my 
executors, &c. And from the reliance which I have in 
Sir W.,de A3ton, and Sir VV. Wynter, two of my e^ecutQrs, 
I wiU^ &.C. And I appoint Sir William de Aston, Sir Wil- 
liam Wynter, Ph. Holgot, and Robert Wyk, my executors. 
And from the confidence I place in the Reverend Father in 
God the Bishop of Winchester, that is to say. Sir William 
Wykbam,andin my very dear and beloved in God, Monsr 
John de Broniwycb, I request them, especially in works of 
charily, to be aiding to my Executors *. Proved before 
William Courteney, Archbishop of Canterbury, at Lam- 
beth, Feb. 9, 1381. 

* She was daughter of William de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, 
K. G. and wife of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, K. G* and.died 
in 1381. * Printed at length in " Royal Wills," p, 98. 



102 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



LADY LORA ATTE LESSE. 

Dame Lora Atte Lease, on the Feast of St. Edmand, 
Archbishop and Martyr ^ 1378. My body to be buried ia 
the Chapel of St. Augustine's at Canterbury. To Sir 
Richard Atte Lesse, Knight, my son; to William Top- 
dive; to each of my sons and daughters; to Marcell atte 
Lesse, my son. 



SIR JOHN NORTHWOOD, KNT. 

John North wood, of Kent, Knight % on the last day of 
February, 1378'. My body to be buried in the Monastery 
of St. Segebert of Minster. I will that two pilgrims be 
sent to visit ** the shadow «'' of St. Peter, Paul, and James, 
in Galacia. To Joane, my wife; to Joane, my daughter; 
to Stepheo, my son, now at school. I desire that William 
Frogenhall, William Sutton, and John More, oversee my 
daughter's marriage. 



* Novemberl6th. 

* He was son and heir of Sir Roger Northwood, Knt. by Juliana, 
daughter of Geo£frey Baron Say, and was summoned to Parlia- 
ment from the S7th to the 49th of Edward III. and according to 
Dugdale, vol. ii, p. 70, died on the 87th of February 1379, 3 Rich- 
ard IL He also states, that he married Joane, the daughter of 
Robert Hert, of Feversham, co. Kent, which is corroborated by a 
pedigree by Glover in Harl. MSS. 807, but a pedigree of North- 
wood, in Harl. MSS. 1058, asserts, that his wife was Katherine, 
the daughter and coheir of Sir John Aspall ; from his calling his 
wife ^' Joane," in his will, if the Harl. MS. last cited is correct, 
Katherine Aspall must have been a former wife. 

3 Query, 1378-9 ? 

* Query if rightly transcribed in the manuscript whence this 
will is taken ? 



T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 103 



SIR NICHOLAS CRIELL, KNT. 

Nicholas Criell', Knt. on the Friday* before St. Mi- 
chael's Day, 1379* To Elizabeth^ ray wife; to Elizabeth 
EchiDgham, xx marks. And I appoint Sir William Eching- 
faam, Knt. Robert Echingham, and Thomas Brokhull, my 
executors. 



SIR ROGER BEAUCHAMP, KNT. 

Roger Beauchamp, Knt.' at London, 19th December, 
1379*- My body to be buried in the Church of the Friars 
Preachers in London, near to the grave where Sybil*, my 
wife, resteth. And I desire that at my funeral there be a 
placebo and dirige with note, and on the morrow after two 
masses, one of our Lady, and another of Requiem. 
Whereas I am bound to do a service on the Infidels, by 
devise of my grandsire. Sir Walter Beauchamp, to the 



* Sic in Harl. MSS. 6148 ; but most likely it should be Criol, and 
he was probably the descendant of Nicholas Criol, who was sum- 
moned to Parliament the 95th Edward I. and left issue Nicholas 
Criol, his son, .who was employed in the Navy in the 18th Edward 
11. to prevent the landing of Queen Isabel and her son Prince Ed- 
ward. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 770- 

* September 23d. 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 37 Edward III. to 3 
Richard II. as Lord Beauchamp, of Bletshoe; having distinguished 
himself in the wars of France, in the 50th of Edward III. he was 
appointed Lord Chamberlain to the Household. 

4 Sic in an abstract of this will in HarL MSS. 6148 ; but Dugdale's 
extract, vol. i«p.251, states that it was dated }9th Janiiaiy, and 
that the testator died on the third of January the same year, which 
at once proves that the date inserted above is the correct one. 

^ Daughter of Sybil, wife of William de Grandison. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 951. 



104 TBSTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

expense of two hundred marks, I will that Roger*, son to 
Roger, my son, shall perform the same when he comes of 
age. To my Chauntry of Bletnesho one hundred pounds, 
for the maintenance of one priest to sing there perpetually 
for my soul, and also for the soul of Sybil, late my wife, 
and all Christian souls; to the Executor of Sir John Coke, 
the Executor of Queen Philippa'. Whereas Philip my 
son is bound to Sir John Thornbury, a Knight, in Lom- 
bardy. To John Philpot, of London, my great cup gilt, 
which the King of Navarre gave me; to Margaret, now 
my wife. And I appoint the said Philpot and Andrew 
Wanton my executors. 



WILLIAM LORD MOALEY. 

William Morley, Knt.* at Halingbnry Magna, in Essex, 
April 16, 1379. My body Co be buried in the Chuich of 
the Friars Augustines at Norwich. And I will that two 
of ray best horses be disposed of for mortuaries, viz. my 
best black horse to those Friars on the day of my funeral^ 



' In Dugdale*s abstract " Roger my son/' and not his grandson. 
It is also there said thatSirRoger Beauchamp bequeathed << to wfaidi 
Roger," all his right in the manor of Bloxham ; but as Roger his 
grandson was found his heir, it is nearly certain that the extract 
from the Harl. MSS. is correct. 

* Philippa, the Queen of Edward III. who died ld69> is pro- 
bably meant ; but as her will is not mentioned in Mr. Nichols* Col- 
lection of Royal Wills, to which this work is so much indebted, it 
is presumed that it is not extant. This and the following bequests 
are omitted in Dugdale's Abstract. 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 3S Edward III. to 2 
Richard II. and died April 30th next foUowing the date of his will, 
which Dugdale^s Abstract, vol. ii. p. 26, states, was made on the 
26th August 1379, but the extract in one of the Harl. MSS. asserts 
that it was dated April 15th, 1379. It is most probable that the lat- 
ter was the case, and that he died on the 30th of the same month. 



N. 



T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 109 

and my palfrey, called Don, to the Rector of the Charch of 
Halingbury. To sevea priests, to celebrate divine service 
for my soul for the space of one whole year next ensuing 
after my decease, xlwiL xiiis. iiiid. I will that one of 
them celebrate at Hallyngbury, one at Swantone, one at 
Hokeryng, one at Hengham, one at Folsham, one in the 
Chapel of Cecily my wife, and the other seventh part of the 
said sum I bequeath to Friar Richard, of the Order of St. 
Augustine, my confessor, the which sum to be equally di- 
vided amongst them ; to Sir Thomas Morley, Knt. my son 
and heir, my best dorser, four costers, and one banker with 
my arms ; and to the said Sir Thomas the plate belonging 
to Cecily \ my wife, marked with the arms of Bardolph. 



SIR JOHN DE ARUNDEL, KNT. 

John de Arundel, Knt.* November 2BA, 1S79* My 
body to be buried in the Priory at Lewes, in the great 
Church there, under an arch near the Funeral Chapel. 
To Eleanor, my wife; to Joane, my daughter, m marks; 
to each of my sons and daughters ; to my brother, the Earl 
of Arundel ; to the Countess of Hereford, my sister. And 

I appoint Sir Robert Rouse, and Sir — Maltravers, 

my executors. 



' She was daughter of Thomas Lord Bardol£ Vide her will 
in a subsequent page. 

* From his describing the Earl of Arundel as his brother, and 
the Countess of Hereford as his sister, it is evident that he was a 
younger son of Edmond Fitz-Alan, fourth Earl of Arundel, though 
Dugdale takes no notice of hkn. This family presents a singular 
instance of adopting the name of their title as the surname of the 
family^ for afler the marriage of John Citz-Alan, Lord of Clun, with 
Isabel, the sister and coheir of Hv^h D*Albini, Earl of Arundel, all 
the descendants called themselves iCrundel instead of Fitz-Alan. 



106 TESTAMENTA VfiTUSTA. 



] 



SIR WALTER PAVELEY, KNT. 

Sir Walter Paveley, Knight % at the Abbey of Rom* 
^^ui^r^iM. «ey , November Slst, 3d Richard 11. Id79. To Eliza- 
bethy my wife. I will that two stones be laid in the 
Church of the Friars Preachers of London, upon my 
father and mother, and upon my father's brother, one 
-armed with the arms of Paveley, the other with Pave- 
ley and St. Phillibert impaled with my father's and bro- 
ther's, and the label ; also that a stone be laid in the Cha- 
^^ pel of Bocton Ch urch for my grandsire and granddame, 
with the escutcheon of Paveley and Burghersh * quarterly. 
•^*^ To Sir Stephen Valence, Knt. my manor of Stou tinge, in 

Kent. 1 appoint Sir John Gildburghe, Knt. and Sir Wil- 
liam de Windsor, Provost of Wingham, my feoffees in my 
manor of Cotton Ditton, in Kent; and I will that my said 
feoffees convey the said manor to Elizabeth, my wife, and 
the heirs of Paveley. And I appoint Thomas Brokhuli 
my executors. 

■ Apparently Sir Walter Paveley, who was the twenty-sixth 
j^night, and one of the founders of the Order of the Garter. 

* It is manifest from this will that there was an alliance both be- 
tween the families of Paveley and St. Phillebert, and between those 
4)f Paveley and Burghersh, though neither is noticed by Dugdale ; 
but it appears, vol. ii. p. 34« that Robert de Burghersh died 24 Ed- 
ward I. seised of the manor of Stutynge, in Kent, which was pos- 
sessed by this Sir Walter Paveley at his death, and in the will of 
Bartholomew Lord Burghersh, K. G. ; in p. 76 it will be found that 
he leaves a legacy to Sir Walter Paveley, and appoints him one of 
his executors. In Buswell's Knights of the Garter, p. 39, in the 
account of Sir Walter Paveley, K. G. it is stated that <' he bought 
of Bartholomew Lord Burghersh, K. G. the manors of Foxgrove, 
Burwash Court, Ditton, with its two appendages Brampton and 
'^•'i^J^ Sifleston, St&mtingy &c. in the County of Kent, in the 43d Edward 
III." It is however asserted in that work that the Sir Walter 
Pavely there mentioned died 28th June, 49 £dward III. 1375, in 
which case it is of course impossible he could have been the testa- 
tor ; but it is not improbable, either that Buswell or the date as- 
signed to this will is incorrect, for every other circumstance af- 



TESTAMENTA VETOSTA. 107 



SIR WILLIAM TRUSSELL, KNT. 

William Trussell, of Cubleston, Knt. ' on the Feast of 
St. Scolast the Virgin', 1379 '• My body to be buried in 
the Chapel of Merston Trussell. To Elizabeth Trussell, 
my heir ; to Sir Warren Trussell, my brother; to Sir John 
Clinton; to my cousin. Sir Thomas D'arderne; to Sir 
William Coksey; the residue of my goods I bequeath to 
Elizabeth, my daughter* ; to Sir Amery Trussell ; to Dame 
Margarey Careswell. And I appoint Sir Reginald Grey^ 
Sir John Clinton, Sir Walter Coksey, and Sir Warren my 
brother, my executors* 



JAMES EARL OF ORMOND. 

James Botiler, Earl of Ormonde, at Lavachery, the last 
day of August, 1379- My body to be buried in the 
Church of Shiere, in Surrey, if 1 die in England. To Eli- 
zabeth, my wife; to James, my son and heir; to my other 
sons and daughters, not married. 

fords strong evidence that the above Sir Walter Paveley was the 
Knight of the Garter in question. 

! Dugdale, in his Baronage, does not give cgiy information about 
this Sir William Trussell, but in a genealogical table in Banks's 
Dormant and Extinct Peerage, vol. i. p. 425, he is said to have 
married Rose Venables, and to have had by her a daughter and heir 
Katherine, the wife of Alured Trussel ; and that the issue of this 
match was a daughter and heir Elizabeth, who married Baldwin 
Frevill, and died s. p. 

• February loth. « Query, 1379-1380? 

* If the statement just cited from Banks be correct, this EL'za« 
beth must have been the testator's ^ancf-daughter. 

^ Bom 1331 ; he was commonly called the Noble Earl on account 
of his descent from the royal &mily, being great grandson of King 
Edward I. and he died in his casUe of Knoctopher on Saturday 
October 18th, 1382, and was buried in St. Kenny's Church at Kil- 
kenny. Carte's Life of the Duke of Ormond, vol. i. p. xxxv. 



108 TESTAMBNTA VBTU8TA, 



WIU-IAM LOHD l^ATIMEH. 

William, l.ord Latimer', July lOtb, 4tb Rich, II. 1360. 
tiy body to be buried Id the Priory of Giseboame, io 
Cleavelaod. Whereas I have givea in fee simple I9 
Richard Earl of AniDdel and Surrey, and others, by char* 
ter inroUed in the Chancery, all my lands, in trost for the 
Lord Nevil* and bis heirs, male or female, upon condition 
that they bear my arms, and pay tp my execntors tloee u 
marks, excepting my manor of Wodeton, and the advow- 

•on of in Surrey, which I give to ThoQias Camoys^ 

my cousin, and bis heirs male ; to Elizabeth, my daughter, 
a • • • • which belonged to Dame Maud Longespee, Coun- 
tess of Salisbury. I will that my house in the parish of 
St. Mary's be sold to found prayers for King Edward's 
soul^ 



MARGARET LADY BEDINGFIELD- 
Margaret Lady Bedingfield', on the Feast of Pente- 



> Knight of the Garter. He was summoned to Parliament from 
42d Edward III. to the 3d Richard II. inclusive, and, according to 
Dugdale, died May 28tb, 4 Richard II. 1380^ which must be erro- 
neous, if the date of his will, as copied from Harl. MSS. 6148, vuu 
the i4th July in that year^ be correct. 

' John Lord Nevil, of Raby, who married Elizabeth Latimer, 
his daughter and heiress, to whom she was second wife ; the eldest 
son of this marriage was summoned to Parliament as Baron lAti- 
mer from 5 Henry IV. to 9 Henry VI. 

* Sir Thomas Camoys, Knt. was in the retinue of William Lord 
Latimer 1 Kichard U. ; he died 9 Henry V. In Dugdale's ac- 
count of the lands of which Lord Latimer died seised, vol. ii. p. 
d^y the manor of Wodeton is not mentioned ; but in the names of 
this Sir Thomas Camoys* lands, vol. i. p. 768, the Manor of Wode- 
ton, in the County of Southampton, is included. 

* He was one of Edward the Third's executors. 

^ Probably ancestor to the present family of that name. 



TESTAMENTA vetusta. 109 

cost*, 1380. My body to be baried in the Church of Bed- 
ford. To James de Bedingfield, my son, and Alice, his 
wife; to Thomas, my son. And I appoint John Thoma- 
fine, Alice de Mickleiield, Margaret Marshal, and Lady 
Segrave, my executors. 



GUICHARD EARL OF HUNTINGDON. 

Guichard D'Angle, Earl of Huntingdon ', at Maden- 
hede, on Easter Dmy', 1380. My body to be buried in the 
Church of the Holy Cross at Engle, before the high altar, 
if I happen to die beyond the seas, in the Chapel of our 
Lady, in the spot where the priest usually stands to cele- 
brate mass,, in which place 1 have made my tomb. But if 
I die in England, then I will that my body be buried in 
the Charch of the Grey Friars at Reading, without any 
hearscj arms, or banners, at my funeral ; and I will that 
my heart be taken out of my body and preserved with spices, 
to be deposited in the said Church of Engle. I will that 
the expenses which would attend my funeral, if celebrated 
with pomp,' be bestowed in masses for my soul, and for 
thirteen poor men in black raiment to carry torches there- 
at. To William D'Engle, whom I make my heir, all lands 
whi'ch I have bought or may buy in France, with all of 
mine in England. And I appoint Sir William de Bean- 
champ, Lord Chamberlain to the King, Sir William de 
Nerii, Sir Lewis de Clifford^ and Sir John Clambrowe, mjr 
Executors. Proved 4th April, 1380. 



' May 13th. 

^ Knight of the Garter. He was a foreigner, but having been 
tutor to Richard the Second, and performed many eminent ser- 
vices at Gascoigne and elsewhere, he was created Earl of Hunt- 
ingdon July I6th, 1377» and died s. p. very shortly afler the date 
t>f hiB will. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 173. Of this nobleman Froissart 
observes he had all the virtues which a knight ought to have, being 
<< merry, true, amorous, sage, secret, large, preux, hardy, adven- 
turous, and chivalrous." ^ March 25th. 



110 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 



SIR JOHN CAVENDISH. 

Sir John Cayendisb, Knt. ' at Bury St. Edmond's^ on 
Monday^ after the Feast of Palm, 1380. My body to be 
buried in the Church of Cavendish, near the body of Alice, 
my late wife. To Andrew Cavendish, my son and heir, 
my manors and lands in Cavendish, Pentlowe, Fakenham, 
Aspes, and Saxham ; to Rose, the wife of my said son An- 
drew; to Margaret, daughter to Andrew, my said son. 
And I appoint Robert de Swynboume, and John Rooks- 
wood, senF, my executors. Proved August 26, 1381. 



EDMOND EARL OF MARCH. 

Edmond de Mortimer, Earl of March and Ulster, Lord of 
Wigmore', at Denbigh, May 1, 1380. My body to be 
buried with the body of my wife, on whom God have 
mercy, in the Church of the Abbey of Wigmore, on the 
left of the high altar, and we charge oar executors that 
they allow no excessive expence at our funeral, but only 
iive tapers of wax, which, after our funeral we will be dis^ 
tributed to the Parish Churches in the neighbourhood of 

* Of the same family as that from which his grace the present 
Duke of Devonshire is descended. He was in the year 1365 con- 
stituted Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and shortly before 
his death was elected Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. 
An infuriated mob seized the person of this venerable Judge^ and 
beheaded him at Bury in 1381. Collins' Peerage, vol. i. p. 280. 

• March 26th. 

' He was bom on Candlemas Eve, February Ist, 1351, and mar- 
ried Philippa, daughter and heiress of Lionel Plantagenet, Duke 
of Clarence, third son of Edward III. The grand-daughter of 
this nobleman conveyed to the House of York their claim to the 
throne. This Edmund Earl of March was much distinguished in 
his time, and was appointed the King's Lieutenant in Ireland the 3d 
of Richard II. and died at Cork on Friday the Feast of St. John 
the Evangelist, S7th December, 5 Richard II. 1381. Dugdale, 
vol. i.p. 149. 



TESTAMEKTA VETU8TA. Ill 

the said Abbey, for the use of the Holy Sacrament. We 
will, after the payment of onr debts, first, that Roger, son: 
of John de Mortimer, be paid d /. for which we are bound 
by Statute Merchant ; to the Church of the Abbey of Wig-^ 
more m /. to be employed according to the directions of nrf 
most honoured lady and mother, and of my eiBe^oton, and 
under the superintendence of the Bishop of Hereford for the 
time being, and of Sir John de Bysbopeston, Mons*^ Peter 
:>. . ^li ja. de la Mars, Sir William Ford, Sir Walter de Colmpton, and 
Hugh de Boraston; to tbesMl Abbey of Wigmore a large 
cross of gold set with stones^ with a relique of the cross of 
our Lord, a bone of St. Richard the Confessor, Bishop of 
Chichester % and the finger of St. Thomas de Cantelowe*, 
Bishop of Hereford, and the reliques of St* Thomas, Bishop 
of Canterbury, See. ; to our most honoured lady and mother; 
to Roger, our son and heir, the cup of gold with a coyer, 
called Benesonne, and our sword garnished with gold, 
which belonged to the good King Edward, with God's 
blessing and ours ; and we will that, after the decease of 
our said son, the aforesaid cup, sword, and a large horn of 
gold, remain to his next heir, and after him to his heirs for 
ever; also our large bed of black satin, embroidered with 
white lions and gold roses, with escutcheons of the arm^of 
Mortimer and Ulster ; also a silver salt-rcellar in the shape 
of a dog, and our best gold horn with the belt; and if our 
said son die before he is of full age, and without heirs of his 
body, then we will that the said things remain to our son 
Edmond, with the like conditions; to our said son Edmond 
three hundred marks of land, &c. ; to our daughter Eliza- 
beth, a salt-cellar in the shape of a dog, a gold cap, and 
two hundred pearls ; to our daughter Phllippa^ a coronet 
of gold, with stones, and two hundred pearls, &c.; to Symon 
Sudbury, Archbishop of Canterbury, a tripod with two 
silver lions gilt and enamelled ; to William Courtney, Bi- 

* Richard de la Wich, who was Bishop of Chichester from 1245 
to 1253, and was canonized. Vide his will in p. 48. 

* Cantelupe. He was Bishop of Hereford from 1275 to 128% 
Chancellor of Oxford and Lord Chancellor, and afterwards ca* 
nonized. 



112 TESTAM£NTA VETUSTA. 

shop of London ; to Friar John Gilbert^ Bishop of Hereford^ 
a plate of silyer for spices, enamelled with the arms of Mor- 
timer on the bottom, and a ring with four rubies, &c. and 
a diamond in the middle ; to our dear brother, Mons' Henry 
Earl of Northumberland'; to our dear son, Mons' Henry 
Percy*, a small nonche, in the form of the body of a stag 
and the head of an eagle; to Mons'' Richard le Scrop a 
silver cup ; to Mons' John Loydl a cup with the covex of 
a blue stone ; to Sir John de Bishopeston a ring of gold 
with a ruby engraved as a signet; also to Thomas, *^ notre 
fn^«">, c/.; to Sir William Ford, to Sir Walter deColmp- 
ton; to Sir John de Briddlewode a cup of silver called 
Wassail^; to Sir John de Kepston xx marks; to Sir John 
Pens; to Monic Pers de la Mar; to Sir Hugh de Boras ton 
a tablet with the images of St. John and St. Katherine. 
And we appoint the Reverend Fathers in God William 
(3ourteney^ Bishop of London, and Friar John Gilbert^ 
Bbhop of Hereford, Henry Earl of Northumberland, Monsr 
Piers de la Mare, Sir Walter de Colmpton, Six John d^ 
Briddewood, Sir John de Kepston, and Sir John Piers, 
OUT executors. Present our son> .Henry Percy, Mr John de 
Colton, Dean d'£velyQ^ Mons^ Hugh Chene, Kni^ht> 
Thoouis, "n're friere*' •, Henry de Ckn-newaiil, Esquire, and 
Sir William Stutevyle^ Chaplain " q* I'iescript/' And wc 
will that this our will be supervised by our most Reverend 

* Henry Percy, the renowned Hotspur, eldest son of Henry Earl 
of NorthuBoberland, married his daughter Elizabeth; hence the 
testator calls this Earl his brother; * Hotspur. Vide note \ . 

' This expression is inserted in the original words, because the 
editor of Royal Wills, p. 117, conjectures the testator to mean his 
own brother Thomas. It is however evident that this supposition 
is erroneous ; for the place in the will where this bequest occurs, 
viz. immediately after, and indeed in the same paragraph with a be- 
quest to Sir John de Bishopeston, who was evidently a clerk, ren- 
ders it ahnost certain that the word '< friere" here meant his chaplain 
or confessor, designating him as our Friar Thomas, from his forming 
part of his domestic establishment. Dugdale does not mention 
any such brother, nor is he named in his mother's will. 

* Wassa], or grace cup * Dublin. ^ Vide note '. . 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 113 

Father in God Simon Sudbury, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
my most honoured lady and mother, and Monsi" Richard Le 
Scrop *. Proved before William Courteney ', Archbishop 
of Canterbury, 22d January 1382 '. 



SIR EDWARD BARKLE, KNT. 

Edward Barkle, Knight. My body to be buried in the 
gate of the Church of St. Mary Carmelites, in Calais. To 
Sir John Clanbrow, Knt. my dominion and monastery at 
Hikeling. 



THOMAS BISHOP OF DURHAM. 

Thomas Bishop of Durham*, March 28, 1381. My 
house in Ottford, near London. To John de Popham, my 
nephew, m marks, which William de Windsor oweth me, 

for Alice Pers*, now his wife. 

-^■— ^^■^— ■ ^—•~^— I » ^— ^■^■^^— — ^— ^— ^— »^^— ^^-^-^— »""— ^^— — ^^^^— ■^■^■^^i^— i^ 

* Printed at length in " Royal Wills," p. 104. 

' This William Courtney is called Bishop of London in the above 
will ; he was Bishop of London from 1375 to 1381, in which year 
he was translated to Canterbury. * Query, 1382-3 ? 

> Thomas H»tfiield, Principal Secretary of State, Prebendary of 
York and Lincoln ; he was consecrated Bishop of Durham in 1345, 
and died in 1381. 

^ The celebrated Alice Perrers, whom many writers have as- 
signed as a concubine to Edward III. ; her extraordinary beauty 
caused her to be made Lady of the Sun in 48 Edward III. when she 
rode from the Tower of London in a procession through Cheapside, 
accompanied by many Lords, Knights, and Ladies, until she came 
to West Sraithfield, where solemn justs were held for seven days. 
A very interesting account of this personage, who has attracted the 
notice of every historian of the reign of Edward III. from her sup- 
posed connection with that monarch, and the influence she is said 
to have had on his councils, will be fpund in Louth's Life of Wick- 
ham, and in Godwin^s Life of Chaucer, vol. iii. p. 76> et seq. ; she 
afterwards married William Lord Windsor. Vide her will in a sub- 
sequent page. 

1 



114 



NICHOLA? AUDLEY. 

Nlcliolas Aodley ^, Lard at ELhi^ Caade ' sad Hald^b, 
138 U Mj body CO be bucied ia the Chmcii af oar Abbej 
Gif Halton, ac the end a£ my tadier s oiaifa^ ia a marMe 
mmby as mj tuber hadu To Elizabedi^ mj wife; to John 
d'AudW. 



WILLIAM EARL OF SUFFOLK. 

William dXtfbrd, Eari of Sarfblk % Toeadaj^ next 
suing the Festival of Sc Barnabas^ ISSU Mj hodj to be 
buried at Cam passe, onder the aich of St. Nicholas' Cha- 
pel there, behind the tomb of mj honooiaUe father and 
mother. I will chat, on the eve and daj of mjfiuKral, there 
shall be fi^e square taposy of the height whkk. mj near- 
est of kin shall think fit, and fbor OBorteis; also fort j-eight 
torches, borne bj fortj-eight poor men clothed in white. 
To Friar Ralph de Norwich, mj coofrwer; to Isabel, my 
wife% lands which shoold descend to me after the death 

• He fSed widHnt one on Sl Harr Msgd^en's daj 15 Ri-\ 
dard IL July «d, 1391 , haling ben in ^ wars cf France in the 
3Sdtnd4€A of Edward IIL aad wm aHmwaiA i appomted Chief 
Jmcice of Waks ; Ui wiie wm Elia^beAi» dbi^hler cf Aice de 
BeanmoDt, Coontem of Boghna. Dogdate, voL L p. 7S0l 

« Red CasUe, m Shiopdiire. Ibid. 

' He wm constitiited Adfloiial of dbe King*k whole Fleet from 
the nMQth <4 the Thames northward SO Edward IIL and hanog 
btcn elected Km^ of the Garter, died suddenly a. p the 15th 
Febmarf 13^ oa the steps of the Home of Lords. Dogdale, 
vol* If, p. 49, 

• The abstract of this win in Harl« MSS. 6148. mys Wednesday, 
hot die fernier is eofrecl, » June 11, the Feast of SI. Barnabas, fell 
'm 1381 on Tuesday. 

• Dngdale states that he manied Joane, daughter and heir of 
Hir VAwwrd de M ontacole, and thai his widow wm Isabd, daugh- 
ter of Thomm de Beaochamp, Earl of Warwick (rdict of John le 
Grange, of Blackmere), who must have been his second wife. 



TESTAMENTA VBTU8TA. 115 

of my dear cousin of Huntingfield ; other lands which I 
should have after the death of Dame Margery, widow to 
Sir Walter de Norwich * ; to my sister. Dame Maud d'Uf- 
ford; to my nephew, Willoughby Lord Eresby; to my 
nephew Scales, and my tieice his wife; to myconsiq of 
Kardeston; to my cousin. Sir Hobert Ufford; to Richard 
le Scroop, xxl. I bequeath my manor of*Tborney to 
Sir Roger de Boys for life. Whereas Isabel, widow df 
Edmond de Herset, has a rent out of Iken. To Sir Johtl 
Peschal my manor of Denyton, if I die without issue. A 
little cross, which Sir Ralf de Hemenhale gave me. I will 
that a picture of ^ hprse and map armed with my arms, be 
made in silver, and offered to the altar of Our Lady of 
Walsingham ; and another, the Uke, to b^ m^de and offered 
at Brbmeholme. To Maud Montagil, Abbe^ of Barking 9^ 
And I appoint Sir Richard le Scroop, oir Robert de SwU* 
lington. Sir Nicholas Gernon, and Sir Roger de Boys, my 
executors, who are to cause a marble tpmb tp be made 
for me at Campasse. 



SIR JOHN BROKHULt, KNT, 

John BrokhuU, Knight, May I6, Gth Rich. II. 1S8«. 
My body to be buried in the Church of the Friars Minors 
at Canterbury, at the chancel door, near the body of 
Editha, my wife. To Saltwood Church ; to Beatrix, now 
my wife. And I appoint Thomas Brokhull, Walter Barry, 
Thomas St. Leger, and William Bilney, my executors. 

* His mother was Margaret, daughter of Sir John de Norwich, 
Knt. • The Sir Walter de Norwich here mentioned was his uncle, 
his mother*s brother, to whose son John the said Margaret was 
found cousin and cdieir. This and all the subsequent persons 
are omitted in Dugdale^ abstract of this will. His nephews John 
third Lord Willoughby de Eresby, and Roger fourth Lord Scales, 
were the sons of his sister. 

? Daughter of Willittn Lord Montacute, and first cousin to his 
first wife Joane de Montacute. 

1 2 



116 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



SIR MAURICE WHICHE, KNT. 

Maarice Whiche, Knight, at London, Satarday, lltb 
July, 1383. My body to be buried in the Church of St. 
Botolpbe without Aldersgate. To my nephew, Robert 
Whiche ; to Elizabeth, my wife ; to Lawrence Sebrook, a 
silver cup; to Joane Whiche, my sister; to Katherine 
Banaster ; to William Wiche, my nephew. 



SIR JOHN BOTETORT, KNT. 

John Botetort, Lord of Weley ", at my Castle of Weley, 
on the Feast of St. John the Baptist*, 1383, 7th Rich. II. 
My body to be buried in the Abbey of Hales^ before the 
high altar. To Maud, my daughter. Abbess of Poles- 
worth, X /. ; to my daughter Anneyne, a nun at Elstow, iv/. 



WILLIAM LORD BARDOLPH. 

William Bardolph, Lord of Wyrmegcye *, at my manor 
of Cathorpe, in the county of Lincoln, September ]£, 
1384. My body to be buried in the quire of the Church 
of the Friars Carmelites at Lenne. To my heir male, 
whomsoever he be, a part of the very cross of otir Lord, 
set in gold. 

SIR WILLIAM DE WYNDESORE, KNT. 

William de Wyndesore, Knight, at Eversham, in the 
diocese of Lincoln, September 10, 1384. To Sir William 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 16 Edward III. until 9 
Richard II. in which year he died. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 47* 

ft June 24th. 

' Dugdale says^ he died the same year, having been summoned 
to P&rliament from the 49th Bdward III. to the 9th of Richard II. 



TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 11? 

de Melton, Sir James de PykeryDge, Sir Walter de Stryk- 
land. Knights, and John de Wyndesore, sen**, all my 
goods, whom I desire to pay my debts, and to provide for 
the health of my sonl therewith; to Robert, Roger, Wil- 
liam, Elias, and Peter de Windesore, sons of my brother 
John de Windesore, deceased ^ In the presence of Wil- 
liam de Cawood, rector of the church of Bolesby, and 
the Reverend Sir John Bakon, Archdeacon of Richmond*. 
Proved October 22, 1384. 



JAMES LORD AUDLEY. 

James Audley*, Lord of Rony Castle', and of Heleigh, 
at Hejeigh Castle, gth Richard IL 1385. My body to be 
buried in the quire of my Abbey at Hilton, before the high 
altar, if I die in the Marches; but if I depart out of this 
life in Devon or Somersetshire, then I will that my body be 
buried in the quire of the Friars Preachers of Exeter. And 
I desire that there be about my corpse five great tapers, 
and that five morters of wax be burnt on the day of my 
burial; and also I will that xl/. be then distributed to poor 
people to pray for my souU To Nicholas, my son c/. one 

^ This clause is added from a note of this will obligingly sent to 
the .editor by George Baker, Esq. F. S. A. the able Historian of 
Northamptonshire. The date of the will is there stated to be the 
15th of September instead of the lOth. 

* Collins' Peerage, vol. iv. p. 68. This Sir William de Wynde- 
sore married the famous Alice Ferrers mentioned in a former note, 
p. 113 ; he died s. p. m., having been summoned to Parliament 5, 
6, and 7 Richard 11. In the 43d Edward III. he was Lieutenant 
of Ireland, and was a distinguished soldier in the reign of Edward 
111. and in the early part of that of Richard II. His will was a 
noncupative one. 

* Knight of the Garter, and one of the Founders of that noble 
order ; according to Froissart, he distinguished himself much at 
the battle of Poictiers. He was summoned to Parliament from the 
1st to the loth Richard II. and died on April 1st in that year. 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 750. > Red Castle, in Shropshire. Ibid. 



il8 tfiSTAMENtA VfiTUSTA. 

doten of silrer yesaelsi and all the armour for my body; to 
Foulk Fitzwarren, and Pbili|> his uncle, all the rest of my 
armour of plate and mail ; to Margaret Hillary, my daugh* 
teT,xL; to Jenkin d'Andley; to Maud de Hei worth, and 
John Marshal, the residue of my goods; to the Monks of 
Hilton Abbey x /. to pray for my soul. 



HUGH EARL OF STAFFORD. 

Hugh Earl of Stafford », April 6, 1385. My body to be 
buried in the Priory of Stone, near to the grave of my 
wife, if I depart this life in England. I will that six large 
tapers be placed about my hearse, and four morters of wax, 
but I desire that no horse of arms be offered at my funeral, 
fiind that no prayers be said thereat excepting by ecclesias- 
tical persons, my allies, and friends. Also I will that oile 
hundred poor men be clothed in white, with a cross behind 
and before on their garments, each of them to carry a 
torch, as well on the vespers as on my burial day. Also I 
will that five hundred masses be celebrated for the souls of 
iny father and mother, my wife, myself, and all my bene- 
factors, also for all Christians, within one year after my 
decease. Likewise I will that within the said year.th^re be 
celebrated fifty masses and trentals of St.Gregory,fdr the souls 
of the before-mentioned persons, by the most fitting people 
that can be found. My sisters Roos*andCharIton*,andDanie 
Elizabeth Stafford. And I appoint my cousin the Archbi- 
shop of Canterbury *, my brother the Earl of Warwick «, 

% _^-^^^M^^^^ 

' Knight of the Garter. 

• Beatrix, wife of Thomas Lord Roos. 

» Johanna, married to Sir John Charlton, son and heir of Lord 

Powys. 

* William Courtenay, the descent of the Archbishop and of the 
testator from King Edward I. rendered them second cousins 
once removed, the former being the great-grandson and the latter 
the great-great-grandson of that monarch. 

« lliomas, fourth Earl of Warwick, was his brother-in-law, this 
Earl of StaflFord having married Philippa de Beauchamp his sister. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 11^ 

the Lord Nevile, the Eiirl of Suffolk, and Sir William 
Beaucbaoipi my execDtprs**. 

ANOTHER WILL OF THE SAID EARL, OR RATHER A 
CODICIL TO TH^ PRECEDING. 

At Jeroemat)i> April y5, 1385. 1 will that my daughter 
Joan be well and fitly parried ; and that^ out of the profits 
of my lands in the hands of my feoffees % my three sons, 
William, Edmund, and Hugh, shall each have one c /. per 
annum during their lives. To Thomas, ray son, my coat 
of mail, d'Astere of Naples, and my helmet made at Bour- 
deaux, with a camail d'astere, and also my sword made at 
Turenne, which Sir Ralf Ferrers gave me. I will also that 
^ree priests be found to celebrate divine service for the 
health of my soul^ near to the place of my burial^ for three 
years next after my decease. 

ANOTHER CODICIL TO THE SAID WILL. 

At Rhodes % in the house of Bartholomew Comerch, Sep- 
tember 21, 1385. To my sister Roos a gold ring with a 
little diamond. To Margaret de Nevill S my daughter, a 
large gold ring, with a great diamond set therein ; to 
Kathe^nede la Pole^, my daughter, a fermail of knots; 
to Joane, my daughter, a golden fermail with a heart; to 
my sister Charleton a large gold ring with a karrect ; to 
Dame Joane d'Engayne, my cousin \ Witnessed by John 

* This was the EarPs first will^ which, according to a note added 
to the abstract of it in Harl. MSS. 6148, was made by his confes- 
sor Sir John Noel on his going towards the Lord's sepulture at Je- 
rusalem. Vide ako Dugdale, voL i. p. 162. 

' Among whom it wQuld appear from the same MS. were Sir Ni- 
dbolas Stafford and John Fremingham. 

* Dugdale •ays, this Codicil was made oo bis return fr^m Jeru- 
salem. 

' First wife of Ralph NevUl, Earl of Westmoreland, K. G. 

4 Married to Michael de la Pole. 

s Joan, his grand-daughter (vie. the daughter of Catherine de la 
Pole), married Sir John D*£ngayne, Knt.and it appears that it is 
to her that he alludes the word '< cousin/' being sometimes used to 
describe a grandchild. 



120 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

RadingtODy Prior of England of the Order of St John, 
Richard Baru, Thomas Skipwith, and the noble Knights Sir 
William Arundel, and Sir Richard Ludlow. 

A THIRD CODICIL TO THE SAID WILL. 

At Rhodes, September 25, 1385. To John Hinckley, my 
Esquire, xx /. ; to Robert Corbet, my Chamberlain x /. ' 



ROGER LORD SCALES. 

Roger Scales, Lord of Neucells *, at Hikelinge, March 6, 
1385'. My body to be buried in the quire of the Monastery 
of Blackburg. To Isabel Scales, a nun at Shouldham. I 
will that prayers be said for Geoffrey de Milton, of Tilney. 
And I appoint Sir John Todenham, Knight, my executor. 



JOHN BACON. 

John Bacon, Dean of the King's Chapel of St. Martin 
Magnus, in London, May 1, 1385. My body to be burled 
in that Church, if I die in England. To Sir Roger Bacon, 
my brother ; to my sisters and brothers. 



JOAN LADY ST. JOHN. 

Joan, widow of Sir Edward St. John, Sundays being St. 

* The above abstracts of the Wills and Codicils of Hugh Earl of 
Stafford are taken from Dugdale, vol. i. p. 163, and Harl. MSS. 
6148, the one often supplying what is omitted in the other. This 
noblemau died at Rhodes, September 96th, 1385, and his body 
being brought to England, was buried at Stone, agreeably to the 
directions contained in his first will. 

* Query, 1385-6? 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 49 Edward III. to 9 
Richard II. and died on Christmas day 10 Richard II. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 617- 

* St. Martin's day, viz, November 10th, fell on a Friday in 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 121 

Martin's day, 1385 My body to be buried in the Chapel 
of St. Mary, in the Monastery of Lewes^ near the body: of 
my late husband. To Margery, my daughter; to John 
Tregoz; to Dame Joan Tregoz ; to John, my son; to the 
Earl of Arundel, a . . . . marked with my father's arms ; 
to his eldest son ; to Thomas Chamberlaine ; to Richard 
Chamberlaine ; to John Pakenham a brown bay horse. 



SIR EDMOND FITZ-HERBERT. 

Sir Edmond Fitz-Herbert, Knt. February 23, 1386. My 
body to be buried in the Monastery of Christ's Church, 
at Twenham, in the Diocese of Winchester. To Joane, 
my wife; to Lucy, my sister, a nun at Shaftesbury; to 
Thomasine, my sister, a nun at Romsey. 



CECILY LADY MORLEY. 

Cecily de Morley, Lady of Aldeby *, at Aldeby, on Thurs- 
day', the Vigil of St. Matthew the Apostle, 1386. My 
body to be buried in the Church of the Friars Augustines 
of Norwich, near the body of Sir William Morley, late my 
husband. To my dear son Sir Thomas Morley, Knt.; to 
Dame Margaret Kerdeston, my sister; to Alice Hales. 



SIR RALPH CARMINOW. 

Ralph Carminow, Knight', January 1386*. My body to 

1385. Hence it is presumed that the above date is erroneously 
copied, and that it was Sunday next after St. Martin'a day, viz. 
November 12th. 

■ Daughter of Thomas Lord Bardolph, and widow of William 
Lord Morley ; she died on Friday next after the Feast of St. An- 
drew the Apostle ensuing the date of her will, viz. 7th December. 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 27. * September !)Oth. 

' He was descended from an old nf^d distinguished family in 
Cornwall. It appears that it was this Jlalph Carminow who was 
Knight of the Shire for that County in 7 Richard II. and Sheriff of 
Cornwall in 1379. * Query, 1386-7 ^ 



1S9 TESTAMBNTA VSTUSTA. 

be buried in Behemet Church. For my sepulture xl /. ; to 
the Convents of Begging Fri^ in Cornwall c 2. ; to WaU 
ter Seljr. And I appoint Dame Alice, my wife, Sir John 
Kentwoody and Sir John Philip, tny executots. 



SIR WILLIAM CROYSIER, KNT. 

William Croysier, Knight, April 10, 1 386. My body to 
be buried in the Church of St. Mary, in Stoke Dabernou. 
To Pavenham Church ; to Elizabeth, my wife. And I ap- 
my son, Sir John Crpysier, Knight, my executor. 



MARGARET LADY CAMOYS. 

Margaret, late the wife of Sir Thomas Camoys, Knight, 
St George's Day », 1386. My body to be buried in the 
Church of St George in Tedington. 



RICHARD LORD POYNINGS. 

Richard Lord Poynings*, Plymouth, June 10, 1387. My 
body to be buried in the parish Church at Poynings, on the 
right side of the tomb of my brother, Thomas Lord Poyn- 
ings >. For the celebration of twenty trentals for my soul, 

• April 23d. 

* Brother and heir to Thomas Lord Poynings ; he was sum- 
moned to Parliament from the 6th to the 9th of Richard II. and 
being about to accompany John of Gaunt, Duke of Ijmcaster, into 
Spain, whither he had before been in the 9 Richard II. made his 
will, which, from the abstract of it in Harl. MSS. 6148, it appears 
was written in haste with his own hand at Plymouth, from whence he 
probably embarked. He died shortly afterwards in Spain, as the 
probate of his will is dated the S6th September the same year. 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 135. 

» Vide his will, p. 92. 



TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA. 1S3 

and all Christian souls, x marks; to Joane^ my daughter, 
for her marriage, co marks; to the infant in my wife's 
womh, if it be a daughter, c /. And if it so happen that I de- 
part this life in such a place that my body cannot be buried at 
Poynings, to the end that my friends afar off may take 
notice thereof, I will that a stone of marble be provided, 
with an escutcheon of my arms, and an helmet under my 
head, and an inscription declaring my name and the time 
of my death. I will that the advowson of the Church of 
Elsyng be sold, and the money be bestowed in masses and 
ttentals for the souls of Sir Michael de Poynings, my 
honourable lord and father, my mother, my uncle Richard 
de Poynings, my grandfather, brother, and sisters, and all 
my relations, and also for the souls of Sir Thomas He- 
ryngaunte, Robert Botiler, John de Tyes, my benefactors, 
for my own soul, and for all Christian souls. To my lov- 
ing Lady Isabel, my wife, daughter to my Lord Robert de 
Grey, then called Fitz-Payne, the Manor of Wrentham 
called Northale, in Suffolk, for her life. Also I will that 
the manors of Preston juxta Ferlee and West Dene, in 
Suffolk, Ifeld'Peverell and Leveland, in Sussex and Surrey, 
with the rents of Staundene and Combesdene, in the Isle 
of Shepey, be retained for the space of twenty years by my 
Executor, for the payment of my debts and the marriage 
of my younger children. To Thomas d'Odingsells. And I 
appoint Sir William Percy, Knight, my executor* 



SIR NICHOLAS DE CAREW, KNIGHT. 

Nicholas de Carew, senior, at my Manor of Bedington, 
13th October, 1387. My body to be buried in the Church of 
St. Mary of Bedingtob, near the sepulture of Mons'' John de 
Carew, my brother, close to the Church door, on the South 
side. To Nicholas de Carew, my son ; to Dame Margaret 
Turberville, my daughter; to Dame Lucy, my daughter. 
Prioress of Redsparre. And I appoint Sir Guy Rocliffe, 
and Sir John WeHiagburge, my executors. 



124 TESTAMRNTA VETUSTA. 



SIR JOHN MONTACUTE, KNIGHT. 

Joha Montacute, Knight, brother to the Earl of Sarum «, 
March 20, 1388, 12 Richard II. My body to be buried in 
the Cathedral Church of Salisbury, between the two pil- 
lars ; but if I die in London, then I desire that my body be 
buried in St. Paul's, near to the font wherein I was bap- 
tized. I will that a black cloth of woollen be laid over my 
body and about my hearse, and to cover the ground. I will 
that cloth of russet and white be distributed to poor people 
after my burial, sufficient to make every poor man a coat 
and a hood ; and upon my burial day I will that there be 
five tapers, each weighing twenty pounds, placed about my 
hearse, and four morters, each of ten pound weight ; also I 
desire that twenty-four poor men, cloathed in white or rus- 
set, carry each a torch, and that no painting be about my 
hearse, excepting one banner of the arms of England, two 
of the arms of Montacute, and two with the arms of Mon- 
thermer % placed by the five tapers. I will that a plain 
tomb be made for me, with the image of a knight thereon, 
and the arms of Montacute, having an helmet under the 
head ; to my sons John and Thomas two gilt pots, marked 
with the arms of Sir John de Grandison'; to my daughter 
Alianore a gilt, cup of the best sort ; to Richard, my son, 
and to Sibyli, Catherine, and M.irgaret, my daughters, a 
cup and ewer each; to Alianore, my. daughter, the crown 
which my wife had in her custody; to the said Sibyli, my 
daughter, xx /.; and to the Prioress and Nuns at Ambres- 
bury XX /. to pray for my soul ; to Margaret, my daughter, 

* He was brother of William second Earl of Salisbury, and hav- 
ing been summoned to Parliament from 31 Edward III. to 13 
Richard II. died February 25th in that year. 

* His wife was Margaret, the daughter and heiress of Thomas 
Lord Monthermer ; her being the great-grand-daughter of King 
Edward I. was perhaps the cause of a banner of England being 
borne at his funeral. 

* His mother was the daughter of William Lord Grandison. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 125 

xxL ; and to the Abbess and Nuns of Berkyng xx /. to 
pray for ray soal; to the Countess of Sarum ; to my sons 
John and Richard all my armour, spears, and swords, to be 
shared betwixt them ; I will that ray sons be ruled by the 
advice of John de Grandison % Bishop of Exeter*. 



SIR RICHARD D' ACTON, KNT. 

Richard D' Acton, Knight, October l6th, 1388. My 
body to be buried in the Monastery of Glaston. To that 
monastery X /.; to my funeral expences xl/.; to Marga- 
ret my wife ; to Richard Gatecomb. 



RALPH LORD BASSETT. 

Ralph Bassett, of Drayton, Knight % Sunday ' next after 
the Feast of St. Hillary 1389, 13 Richard IL My body to 
be buried in the Cathedral Church of Litchfield, near the 
altar of St. Nicholas. To the Priory of CanWell cc /. be- 
sides tenements in Litchfield and Walsall, for the aug- 
mentation of that convent with five more monks, and to 
find one priest to pray perpetually for my soul, and for the 
souls of my ancestors at the said altar of St. Nicholas, and 
for keeping my obit with certain lights, and likewise to 
make a wall towards the water, and a new belfrey. I will 



> Probably his relation. * Harl. MSS. 6148. 

* Knight of the Garter ; he was summoned to Parliament from 
the 31st of Edward III. to the 13th of Richard II. and died s. p. on 
May loth following the date of his will. It appears that he made 
another will some years before, viz. 7 Richard II. an abstract of 
which will be found in Dugdale's Baronage, vol. i. p. 380^ but as it 
only contains bequests to different religious houses, it was not 
thought necessary to insert it in this work. 

' 17th January. 



126 TESTAMENTA VBTySTA. 

that four cbaa^triea be founded to pray for luy soul for 
ever iu the following places \ two at Bethlem without Bi-« 
shopsgate ; one in the Chapel of Our Lady in the Church, 
and at Olney ; and one in the new Chapel built by me at 
Colston Basset^ iq honour of St. Ivo> for ^hich I give cc/.; 
also I will that the person^ whosoever he be, that shall 
first bear my surname and arms, according to my will, shall 
have the use of my great velvet bed for life, but not to be 
alienated from him who should bear my name and arms ; 
to the same person four silver basons, with two ewers 
whereon my arms are graven, six 9ilver dishqs, two silver 
pots, and four chargers, all marked with tny arms ; as also 
a cup with a cover, gilt, having one ring on the side 

thereof' ; my plate, which once belonged to Sir Bald* 

win Freville; to Joan*, my wife, all the goods which she 
brought, so that she ask no more but that and my legacy. 
And I constitute Walter Skyrlaw, Bishop of Durham; 
Richard Scrope, Bishop of Chester; and Sir Richard 
Scrope, Knight, my executors. 



WALTER CULPEPER, 

Walter Culpeper, pf West Peckhara, Mpnday after the 
Purification of our Lady% 1389. My body to be baried 



' Copied verbatim from Dugdale*8 abstract of this will, vol. i. p, 
381. 

* Omitted in Dugdale's abstract, but so in Harl. MSS. 6148. 
Joane, his wife, was the sister of John IV. Duke of Brittany, In 
the Memoires pour servlr d^ Preuves ft la Histpir^ d^ Bretagne^ t. 
ii.p. 6S1, is a grant from Rid^ard II. to this Jo^oe, dated 2l0t 
April, 21 Richard II. in which she is described as << Johaane que 
fuit uxor Radulphi Basset 0e Drayton, Chev, sorori cariss'i fratris 
nostri, Job. Ducis, Britannie et Comitis Richmund.*' In the wiU 
of her brother she is styled, <^ nostre tres phere ^t bien amte sceur 
de pere et de mere la Dame de 3asset.*' 

3 8th February. 



tBSTAMENtA VEtUSTA. 127 

in the Church of West Peckham ; Walter, my father ; to 
John, my son, and Catherine his wife ; to Margaret, my 
sister. 



MARGARET COUNTESS Ot DEVON. 

Margaret de Courtney, Countess of Devon ^| January 
28th, 1391. My body to be buried in the Cathedral Church 
of Exeter, near the body of my lord and husband, and I 
desire that there be no other hearse than plain bars to keep 
off the press of people, and only two tapers of five pound 
each, one at my head, the other at my feet, without any 
torches or other lights ; I will that on my burial day xx h 
be distributed to poor people, to every one a groat ; I will 
that cc /. be distributed amongst the daughters of knights 
and gentlemen, towards their marriage portions, and to poor 
scholars at school ; to Margaret, the daughter of my son 
Philip one hundred marks, to increase her portion ; to Wil- 
liam^ my son, Archbishop'of Canterbury^ a gilt chalice and 
a missal ; to my daughter Cobham * xl /. ; to my daughter 
Lutterell' x2.; to my daughter Engaine^xL?. with two 
primers and a book called Arthur de Bretagne ; to my son, 
the Earl of Devon, all my swans at Topsham ; to my son 
Philip' all the furniture of my Chapel, books, vestments, 
candlesticks, &c. ; to my daughter Lady Ann Courtney a 
ring with a diamond ; to my son Peter ' my bed of red and 



* Widow of Hugh Courtenay, Earl of Devon, K. G. who died in 
1377> and daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and 
Essex, by Elizabeth PlantageneC, daughter of King Edward the 
First I she died 16th December, 15 Richard II. anno 1391. 

* Margaret, who married John Lord Cobhaiti. 

9 Elizabeth, the wife of Sir Andrew Lutterel, and widow of John 
de Yere. 

* Katherine, wife of Sir Thomas Engaine. 

^ Of Powderham, ancestor of the present Viscount Courtenay. 

* Sir Peter Courtenay, K. G. 



128 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

green, paly ; to the Abbess of Canonlegb ; to the IVioress 
of Corn worth ; to the Prior of Benliche ; to the Prioress of 
Polsho; to Joan, my daughter; to Hugh Lutterel. 



SIR ROBERT DE SWYLLINGTON, KNIGHT. 

Robert de Swyllington, Knight '. My body to be buried 
in the Priory of Kirkby upon Wresthek ; to Margaret my 
wife; to Margery Swyllington, my daughter ; to Richard 
SwyllingtoD, Rawlyn Swyllyngton, and Roger Swylling- 
ton, my sons ; to Thomas Hopton, my bastard ; to Joan, 
wife of Roger Swyllington; to Margaret, my wife, the 
wardship and marriage of Margaret Fresh ville. Proved 
July 2?d, 1391. 



SIR FULK FITZWARINE, KNT. 

Fulk Fitzwarine, Knight, at Heleigh Castle, Tuesday • 
next before the Feast of St. Laurence 15 Richard II. My 
body to be buried in the Chancel of the Church of Whit- 
tington, where I will that a tomb be made over my sepul- 
ture. To Philip Fitzwarine, my uncle, the Manor of Spy- 
cherwyk ', for life. And 1 appoint Elizabeth, my wife, and 
the said Philip, my executors. Proved 5th November 
1391. 



* Of this name, and probably of the same family, was Adam de 
Swillington, of Lincolnshire, who was summoned to Parliament 
from 20 Edward II. to 2 Edward HI. Dugdale^ vol. ii. p. 101. 

^ 8th August 1391. 

> This manor is not mentioned in Dugdale*s list of the lands of 
which he died seised, nor is it included in the imperfect abstract 
which he gives of this will. Vol. i. p. 446. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 129 



SIH JOHN WORTH, KNT. 

John Worth, Knight, May Ist, 1391. My body to be 
baried in the Church of Hampton Meyse. To Dame 
Blanch my wife ; to Robert Worth, my cousin ; to John 
Worth, my base son. And I appoint Henry Norton and 
John Ferrour my executors. 



RICHARD EARL OF ARUNDEL. 

Richard Earl of Arundel and Surrey', March 4th, 1392% 
\6 Richard IL'in my Castle Philipp. My body be buried in 
the Priory of Lewes* in a place behind the high altar, which 
I have shewn to my beloved in God DanzJohan ChierlieuS 
Prior, and frere Thomas Assheboume, my confessor. In case 
my most dear wife E.% on whom God have mercy,benot there 
interred by me, 1 charge my executors that they cause my said 
wife to be conveyed from her present tomb to the said place, 
with the same form as the body of my most honored Lord 
and father was buried. If I die in England I desire that my 
corpse be privately conveyed to the said Priory, and I for- 
bid any hearse, armed men, or other pomp, being allowed 
at my burial, but if I die out of England, and my body 
cannot be conveniently brought to that Priory, then I will 
that I be interred where my executors or those about me at 

> Knight of the Garter and Admiral of the King's Fleet 10 R. 
IL he was beheaded at Cheapside 21 Richard II. 1397. ^ 1292-3 . 

> Dugdale says, vol. i. p. 320, that this will was dated 4th March 
1382, 6 Richard II. which is not only contradicted in the copy of 
this will, printed at length in Royal Wilb, p. 120, from which the 
above is taken, but it is manifestly erroneous, from the Earl men- 
tioning his second wife Philippa, whom, Dugdale informs us, he paid 
a fine in the 15 Richard II. for having married without the King's 

license. 

* John de Cariloco, whowas Prior of that place from 136*4 to 1377. 

* Elizabeth, his first wife, daughter of William de Bohun, Earl 
of Northampton, K. G. 

K 



ISO TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my death may think proper; my Manors of Angermeryn, 
Wepham> Wamecamp, Soucstoke, Tottyngton, Upmer- 
don, and Pyperyng ; whereas my most honored Loitl and 
father, whom God pardon, devised to me by his will certain 
jewels and books, the greater part to remain in the Chapel 
in the Castle of Arundel, I will, 8ic.; my mother of Nor- 
folk ■; my dear wife gave me at our marriage a red vest- 
ment, 8ic. I will that my said wife retain the said vestment 
for her life, if she particularly wishes to have it ; to my most 
dear wife Philippa* a blue bed marked with my arms and 
the arms of my late wife ; also the hangings of the hall, 
which was lately made in London, of blue tapestry with red 
roses, with the arms of my sons the Earl Marshal \ Lord 
Charlton ', and Mons' William Beauchamp * ; to my said 
wife Philippa her own cup called Bealchier, two salt cellars 

' A note to Royal Wills contains the following remarks on this 
bequest : '< This expression is satisfactorily explained by the fol- 
lowing observations of a judicious friend. It is yet a custom in the 
North for parents, whose diildren intermarry, to call brothers and 
sisters. Richard Earl of Arundel upon this principle calling Eli- 
zabeth Lady Mowbray his sister, of course Margaret Duchess of 
Norfolk would be his mother, and he might have the vanity to call 
her so, she being a woman of high rank and fortune. See the fol- 
lowing pedigree : 

Richard Fitz-Alan,=pEleanor Plan- John Lord=MargaretPlanta- 
Earl of Arundel. tagenet. Segrave. I genet. Duchess 

of Norfolk. 

Richard Fitz-Alan^=^EUzabeth, daughter Elizabeth=pJohn Lord 
Earl of Arundel, | of William Earl of Segrave. | Mowbray. 
the testator. I Northampton,K.G. I 

Elizabeth.=^Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, K. G. 

•^ 
Many instances of the kind will also be found in the Paston Letters. 

* His second wife, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, 
and widow of John de Hastings. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 319. 

) Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, who had married his 
daughter Elizabeth. 

* Hufband of his daughter Alice. 

' Lord Abergavenny, husband of his daughter Joane. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 131 

of silver which she gave me for my new years gift at Cas* 
tie Philipp \ likewise two candlesticks of silver for supper 
in winter, a pair of silver basons with my arms, and a pair 
id basons in which I was accustomed to wash before 
dinner and supper ; to my said wife the apparel for the 
heads of ladies, as well of pearls as other attire, which I 
gave my said dear wife in my life, so long as she lives, 
and after her decease I will that the said attire be im- 
mediately divided between my sons Richard and Tho- 
mas, because it appears likely they will marry, if God spares 
their lives, if they are not married before my death ; and 
also that my daughter Charlton have her part, equally di- 
vided between my said two sons and her, fully relying on 
my said wife, that if she be inclined to marry again, she 
will secure the said attire that it be not taken from my be« 
fore named children ; to my son Richard a standing bed 
called Clove, also a bed of silk, embroidered with the arms 
of Arundel and Warren, also to my said son the hangings 
of the large hall of the arms of Arundel and Warren quar- 
terly ; to my dear son Thomas, from the day of my death, 
c L annually in aid of his maintenance, also the Manors 
of Begenever, SuUyngton, and Schapewyk, also iny blue 
bed of silk embroidered with grifEns, a piece of hanging 
which Monsi" William Brian gave me, also the white and red 
hangings embroidered with my arms in the middle, which 
is generally at Ryegate ; to my dear daughter Charlton ; 
to my daughter Elizabeth a nonch with lions and crowns, 
which was given me by my very dear son her husband ; to 
my daughter Charlton my bed of red silk, which is gene- 
rally at Reigate; to my daughter Mareschal^; to my 
daughter Margaret my blue bed, usually at London ; I will 

' Query^ where? His will is dated at the same place, ^'en 
moun Chastel Philipp." 

^ Dugdal^, vol. i. p. 391, conjectures that he means Joan, wife of 
William Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, Marshal of the King*s 
house ; but it is pretty evident that he alludes to his daughter Eli- 
zabeth, the wife of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal, for in 
another place he says << my sons the Earl Marshal^ Charlton^ and 
William de Beauchamp" 

K 2 



132 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

that my said daughter Margaret^ have annually for her 
maintenance c marks, until she be properly married, in aid 
of which marriage I bequeath m marks, to be paid by my 
executors, if she be not married during my life ; to my most 
dear and honored brother, the Archbishop of York % my 
cup enamelled with a stag on the top, in remembrance of 
me and my soul; to my dear sister of Hereford' my cup 
with hearts; and to my dear sister of Kent« my cup with 
trefoils, that is to say, if my said sisters assist in the fulfil- 
ment of my will ; to my mother of Norfolk a cross of gold 
in a red leather case, also an Agnus Dei of gold, enamelled, 
in remembrance of me and my soul ; to my honored lady 
and niece of Gloucester ', in remembrance of me, and that 
she may be kind to my executors, a small tablet of gold 
with a crucifix within, '^etlacoronaciounenlasummite, et 
enamaillez dehors;" to the house of Robertsbrugge to as- 
sist their building their sea walls xx 2. ; I will that the re- 
ligious houses, especially Arundel, and also Lewes, Ciches- 
ter, Winchester, Canterbury, Guildford, and London, be 
reminded by my executors that they are bound to pray for 
the souls of my honored Lord and father, my most honored 
Lady motber, and my most dear wife, God that for his 
great mercy and passion which he suffered for them and 
for all Christians, may have mercy on the three, and us 
also when we pass out of this life. Amen ; to frere Thomas 
Asshebourne, my confessor, to keep my soul in re- 
membrance, c marks ; I will that the advowson of Yvele 
sold, but in case the said Church be vacant before the 
advowson can be sold, and either of my sons willing 
to be a man of Holy Church, be able to accept and 
occupy it, then I desire my feoffees to present him to 
it, otherwise my clerk Robert Pobelowe, if he be then 
alive and wishes to have it; and if the said Robert be 

' She aflerwards married Sir Rowland Lentliall, Knt. 
^ Thomas, afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury. 
*^ Joan, wife of John de Bohun, Earl of Hereford. h*^*f^ 
* Alice, wife of Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent 
^ Eleanor, wife of Thomas Piantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, 
niece to his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 133 

DOt alive or does not desire it, then I will that the said 
Church be given to my chaplain Sir John Gamil, but if 
the said John does not accept it, or be dead when it be- 
comes vacant, then I will that it be presented to my next 
of kin who may be able to hold it ; if my goods, Sic. be not 
sufRcient to pay my debts and legacies my house of Poult- 
ney * to be sold, but if it be not necessary to sell it, then I 
desire my feoffees to render it as securely as possible to my 
ri^ht heirs the Lord of Arundel for ever; I will that the 
coronet, bible in two volumes, and a pair of decretals* in 
French, a large gold chain, with certain other jewels and 
relicks contained in a small box fastened with silver and 
massive lions gilt, which my honored lord and father, on 
whom God have mercy, devised to me and my heirs, remain 
for ever from heir to heir Lords of Arundel, in remem- 
brance of him and of his soul, and if my said heir be under 
age, I desire that my executors put the said coronet, bible, 
decretals, and jewels, in a secure place, until he arrive at 
full age, and then to deliver them to him as they will an* 
swer before God, my said honored Lord and father, whom 
God pardon, and me at the Day of Judgment ; to my most 
dear son Charlton a cup ; to Mons'' John Cobham a cup ; 
to Mons^ Richard Scrope a cup ; to frere Thomas Asshe- 
bourne a cup ; tp Monsr Payn Tiptoft a cup of silver, and 
two of my best horses ; to Monsr William Percy a cup ; to 
John Cokkyng, Thomas Younge, and Thomas Harlyng, 
each a cup in remembrance of me. And I constitute and 
appoint the Reverend Father in God, my most dear and 
honored brother of York, my dear son Charlton, my dear 
friends Mons' John de Cobham, Mons^ Richard le Scrope, 
Mons' Payn Tiptoft, frere Thomas Asshebourne, Sir Ro- 

» Poultney*s Inn, so named after its proprietor Sir John Poult- 
ney, who was Lord Mayor of London in IS 19, 1330, 1333, and 
1336 ; he gave it to Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, whose 
brother and heir William Earl of Northampton, K. G. was the fa- 
ther of Elizabeth Counters of Arundel, the first wife of this Earl 
Richard, who probably acquired it by his marriage. 

* A volume of the Canon Law^ so called, collected by Gratian, 
a monk of the order of St. Benedict. 



134 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

bert Pobelowe, Sir John Gamal called Russel, John Cock* 
jng, Thomas Yonge, and Thomas Harlyog, my execa< 
tors ♦. 



SIR JOHN DEVEREUX, KNT. 

John Devereux, Knight', Tuesday,. • June 1385. My 
body to be buried in the Church of the Grey Friars at 
London, and I will that six tapers in the form of a cross be 
placed upon my hearse, and that six men clothed in white 
bear six torches, and that each of them receive xlJ. for his 
pains; also to every poor man at my burial one penny to 
pray for my soul, and for all Christian souls ; to the Grey 
Friers for my burial there xl marks, and I will that as soon 
as possible after my death one thousand masses be said for 
my soul, and for the souls of my father and mother ; to 
Margaret, my wife*, four dozen of silver dishes and six 
chargers of silver; but after her death the same to remain 
to John my son, and in case of his death to Joan * my 
daughter. Proved 24th February 1392. - f^v 



ISABEL DUCHESS OF YORK. 

Isabel Duchess of York, Countess of Cambridge ^ My 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 120, and of which the 
above is a brief extract, as it extends from p. 120 to p. 143 of that 
volume. It is very curious, and is well worthy of the attention of 
Antiquaries ; but the limits of this work prevented more copious 
extracts being made from it. 

' Knight of the Garter. He was summoned to Parliament 
from 8 to 16 Richard II. and died the next year. Dugdale, vol. 
il. p. 177. 

* Daughter of Sir John Barre, who survived him. 

> Sic in Dugdale*8 Abstract, bi^t a MS. note of it calls her Ja- 
net; it appears she afterwards became his heir (his son John dying 
s. p.) and married Sir Walter Fitz- Walter, Knt. Ibid. 

* She was the daughter of Peter the Cruel, King of Castile, and 
first wife of Edmund Plan tagenet,K.G. 5th son of Edward III. Duke 
of York and £arl of Cambridge, by whose special license she made 



TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 135 

body to be buried wheresoever my Lord and husband, and 
the King shall appoint, and I desire that upon the day of 
my death an hundred trentals and one hundred sauters be 
said for my soul ; likewise that^ four priests, or one at the 
least, shall sing for me for four years, and that on my bu- 
rial day my best horse be given for my mortuary ; to the 
King my heart of pearls ; to the Duke of Lancaster a tablet 
of jasper, which the King of Armonie gave me; to Edward 
Earl of Rutland, my son, my crown, to remain to his heirs; 
to Constance le Despencer >, my daughter, a fret of pearls; 
to the Duchess of Gloucester*, my tablet of gold, with 
images, also my sauter with the arms of Northampton'; to 
the King, after the payments of my legacies, the remainder 
of my goods in trust, that be allow to Richard, my son, his 
god-son, five hundred marks annually for his life. And I 
appoint Mons^ Lewis Clifford and Mons' Richard Stury 
my executors. Proved 6th January 139^. 



SIR JOHN GOLAFRE, KNT. 

John Golafre, Knight, January 19th, 1393. My body 
to be buried in the Chancel of the Church of the Friars 
Minors of Exeter, if I die within the land of England; to 
King Richard, my Lord, my better gross horse ; to Queen 
Ann, my Lady, a great ring with a large diamond ; to Phi- 
lippa my wife; to Dame Elizabeth Golafre x pounds; to 
Dame Alice Golafre, my sister, xx pounds; to William and 
John Golafre, my cousins ; to Elizabeth Kirkby ; to Agnes 
and Peter Chamberiayne. And I appoint William Wil- 
koks and Thomas Barantyne my executors. 



her will. There is some di£Bculty in fixing tlie date of this testa- 
ment ; Dugdale's abstract states, 6 December 1342, 6 Richard II. 
which is impossible, as the 6th of Richard II. is 1388. The MS 
note of it merely says October 6th, without mentioning any year. 

' Wife of Thomas Lord Despencer. 

* Eleanor de Bohua, wife of Thomas Duke of Gloucester, and 
daughter of Humphrey Earl of Hereford, Essex, and Northampr 
ton. * Bohun, Earl of Northampton. 



136 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 



SIR JOHN COBHAM, KNT. 

John Cobbam, of Hever, July 13tb, 1394. My body to 
be buried in the belfry of St. Peter's Church at Hevre. To 
my daughter Elizabeth cc marks; to my brother Ralph 
Cobham c marks ; to Ralph Cobham of Chafford ; to Joha 
Lewknor and Katheriue Lewknor a red bed embroidered 
with lions, also abed of Norwich stuff, embroidered with but^ 
terflies, and a **♦ marked with the arms of Tregoz ; to Joan 
my wife; to Reginald my son; Guy de Mohun, Bishop of 
St. David's, Treasurer of England ; to Ralph Cobham, of 
Devon, my brother. 

ROBERT LORD WILLOUGHBY OF ERESBY. 

Robert LordWillonghby, of Eresby », Saturday', the Eve 
of the Holy Trinity, 19 Richard II. 1395. My body to be 
buried in the Chapel of the Holy Trinity of my Chapel of 
Spillesby. I will that the master of the said chantry, being 
parish priest of Spillesby, shall have mj' best horse and my 
best saddle for a mortuary, and in satisfaction of my 
tithes and oblations forgotten or negligently paid by me or 
my officers; to Elizabeth my wife'; to Robert and Tho- 
mas, iny sons; to Thomas, my son, a * * *, with the arms 
of Nevill and Latimer; to John and Brian, my sons; to 
Margaret, my daughter; to Sir William, my son, a dia- 
mond that belonged to the Earl of SuflTolk*, and a ♦ * *, 
which was once my Lady Wake's ; to the Countess of 



* He was summoned to Parliament from 40 Edward III. to 19 
Richard II. inclusive, and died 9th August SO Richard H. Dug- 
dale, vol. ii. p. 84. * June 5th. 

' His second wife, sister and heir to John Nevil, Lord Latimer, 
according to Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 84 ; but Harl. MSS. 105S, fo. 138, 
says she was his third wife, and that his second wife was Margaret, 
daughter pf Lord Zouch, of Haryngworth. 

* ^Q whom he was one of the heirs ; his mother having been 
Cecily, sister and coheir of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 137 

Warwick ^ I pray John Lord Beaumont, Sir Philip De- 
speocer, and Sir Walter Taileboys to be aiding to the ful- 
filment of this my wilL 



ALICE LADY WEST. 

Alice West •, at Cherllon without Newgate •, in the pa- 
rish of St. Sepulture, London, July 15th, 1395. My body 
to be buried in the Priory of the Canons of Christ Church, 
in the County of Southampton, with my ancestors* To 
Thomas, my son, a bed of tapiter's work, also a pair of 
matin books, a pair of beads, and a ring wherewith I was 
espoused to God *, which were my Lord my father's ; to 
3oan', my son's wife, a bed paled black and white, and all 
my books of Latin, English, and French ; also the vest- 
ments of my Chapel, and what belongs to the altar,' with 
all other apparel thereunto belonging, as silver basons with 
escutcheons of ray ancestors arms ; to Sir Nicholas Clyf- 
ton, Knight, and Eleanor his wife, my daughter, and 
Thomas Clyfton, her son, one hundred and twenty pounds; 
to my sister Dame Lucy FitZrHerbert, Prioress of Shaftes- 
bury, forty pounds ; to my sister Thomasine Blount a nun 
at Romsey, in the County of Southampton, forty marks ; 
for four thousand and four hundred masses to be sung and 
said for the soul of Sir Thomas West, my Lord and bus- 

■ ■ - _ - _ _ , ■ ■ — — — „ - ■ -■ — J . ■ ^ 

* Wife of Thomas fourth Earl of Warwick, K. G. and first. cousin 
to the testator, as her mother was Margaret de Uffbrd, anothear 
sister and coheir of the Earl of Suffolk, 

s W^idow of Sir Thomas West, Knt. who died 1386, ancestor of 
the Earl De la Warr, and daughter of Reginald Fitz-Piers, Baron 
of Wolverly ; she died 1395. 

> Sic in the abstract of this will in Collinses Peerage, vol. v. p. 
378 ; but according to an extract in Dugdale*s Baronage, vol. ii. p. 
139, it was dated at Hynton Martel. 

^ It seems from this bequest that after her husband's death she 
took the veil, but which is not recorded either by Collins or 
Dugdale. 

^ She was sister and heir of Thomas Baron De la Warr, by 
which alliance the Barony of De la Warr came into that family. 



138 TESTAMENTA V8TV8TA. 

bandy my own soul, and all Christian souls, in the mosl 
haste that may be, within fourteen nights next after my 
decease; to the Canons of Christ Church, to read and sing 
masses for my Lord's soul, and my soul, so long as the 
world shall last, forty pounds; to the nuns of St. Olave's in 
London, and to the priest of the said house one hundred 
shillings, to pray for the soul of my Lord and husband Sir 
Thomas West, my own soul, and for the estate of Thomas 
my son, Joan his wife, and their children ; to the religious 
women dwelling without Aldgate, London, and to those of 
the houses of Shaftesbury, Romerslye, Wilton; to the 
Friars within Newgate, London, to each of them one 
hundred shillings ; the rest of my goods to Thomas, my 
son, and I desire that wherever I die my body be carried 
to the Priory of Christ's Church, and there buried, at the 
first mass with a taper of six pounds of wax standing and 
burning at my head, and another at my feet. And I ap- 
point Thomas, my son, my sole executor. 



MARGARET LYONS. 

Margaret, wife of Thomas Lyons, of Ashton, Tuesday 
after the Feast of St. Luke '. To the Friars near Bristowe. 
the reversion of my lands between Isabel my daughter, 
wife to Walter Redeney ", Knight, and Elizabeth, wife to 
Thomas Wodvile, Knight, my sons ; Edmund Plunket, 
late my husband ; to Isabel, my daughter. 



SIR NICHOLAS DAGGWORTH, KNT. 
Nicholas Daggworth, Knight*, December 6th, 1396. 

* Circa 1396, but the date is not given. * Quexy, Rodney ? 

* It is probable that it was this Sir Nicholas Dagworth, of whom 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 148, relates an anecdote of distinguished gal- 
lantry, of his defeating sixty French horse with thirteen English ; 
he calls him ** a right valiant soldier," and says that he was one of 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 189 

My body to be buried in the Cbarch of St. Bennett's, near 
Paul's Wharf, in the North Chapel ; to Bleanor, my wife, 
one third part '* of my goods to be quiet." And I appoint 
John Winter, of Little Bellingham and John Cressham my 
executors. 



THOMAS EARL OF KENT. 

In the nanne of God, Amen. In the day of the resurrec- 
tion of our Lord Jesus Christ, the year of him a thousand 
three hundred fourscore and seventeen. I Thomas of Ho- 
land, Earl of Kent* and Lord Wake, being in whole memory, 
ordain and make my testament in this wise. First, I ** geve 
and bytake" my soul to our Lord Jesus Christ and to his 
mercy, and to the help and grace of our Lady his blissfuU 
mother, and the help of all Saints of Heaven, and my body 
to be buried as soon as it ** goodlich" may in the Abbey of 
Brune. And I give and devise to Alice my wife % and 
Thomas my son, all my cattle and goods moveable, pray- 
ing my wife, for all the love add trust that hath been be- 
tween us, and also praying and charging my son upon my 
blessing, that they by good love and one assent govern 
him in such wise tiiat at her power my debts may be quited, 
and my old servants ^'iholpe" in discharge of me. And to 
execute my will and revise aforesaid, I ordain and make my 
wife and son aforesaid mine executors*. Proved before 
Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury, at Lambeth, 
10th May 1397. 

Richard the Second*s favourites, and in the 19th Richard II. was 
employed with Walter Skyrlaw, Bishop of Durham, in an embassy 
to Calais^ ** after which time,** he adds^ ** I have seen no more of 
him." 

> Son of Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, K. G. by Joan Planta- 
genet, the mother of Richard II. He was born 1350, was Mar- 
shal of England 3 Richard II. a Knight of the Garter, and died 
15th April 1S97' Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 75. 

* Daughter of Richard Earl of Arundel. 

* Royal Wills, p. IIS. The above is a verbatim copy of this 
will, but the orthography has been modernized, excepting in the 
places marked with inverted commas. 



140 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



JOHN DUKE OF LANCASTER. 

I, John, son of the King of England, Duke of Lancaster % 
February 3d, 1397- My body to be buried in the Cathe- 
dral Church of St. Paul, of London, near the principal 
altar, beside my most dear late wife Blanch % who is there 
interred. If I die out of London I desire that the night 
my body arrives there, that it be carried direct to the Friars 
Carmelites in Fleet Street, and the next day taken strait to 
St. Paul's, and that it be not buried for forty days, during 
which I charge my executors that there be no cering or 
embalming my corpse; I will that my executors pay all 
my debts, excepting the debts for the army, which my be- 
loved brother the Duke of York incurred in Portugal, of 
which before God and all the world I hold myself free ; I 
desire that chauntries and obits be founded for the souls of 
my late dear wives Blanch and Constance % whom God 
pardon ; to the said altar of St. Paul's my vestment of satin 
embroidered, which I bought of Courtnay, embroider at 
London, certain lands and tenements in London, of which 
the reversion is purchased, rendering xx marks a year to 
Dame Katherine del Staple for her life, and I desire that 
during her life she be paid out of the rents of the Manor of 
Bernoldwyk, in the county of York; to the prisons of 
Newgate and Ludgate, in London c marks, to be divided 

between them ; to my most dear wife Katherine % my two 

■ ■ — > 

* The renowned John of Gaunt ; he was bom in 1340, and died 

circa the Feast of the Purification of Our Lady 2d February 1399, 
at the palace of the Bishop of Ely in Holborn. 

* His first wife, daughter and heiress of Henry Duke of Lan- 
caster. 

' Constance was his second wife ; she was the daughter and co- 
heiress of Peter, King of Castile, in whose right he claimed that 
crown. She died in 1394. 

4 Catherine, eldest daughter and coheir of Sir Payn de Roet, 
King of Arras of Hainault, and widow of Sir Hugh Swynford ; he 
cohabited with her for many years prev^ious to the death of his se- 
cond wife, and by her had John Beaufort, Henry, Thomas, and 
Jean, who were legitimated by act of Parliament 20 Richard II. 
with an express reservation of their ever possessing any right to 



TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 141 

best nouches which I have, excepting that which I have 
allowed to my Lord and nephew the King, and my large 
cap of gold which the Earl of Wilts ' gave to the King my 
Lord, and which he gave me on my going into Guienne, 
together with all the buckles, rings, diamonds, rubies, and 
other things, that will be found in a little box of cypress 
wood, of which 1 carry the key myself, and all the robes 
which I bought of my dear cousin the Duchess of Norfolk*, 
also my large bed of black velvet, embroidered with a circle 
of fetter-locks % and garters, all the beds made for my body 
called in England ^' trussing beds," my best stay with a 
good ruby, my best collar, all which my said wife had be- 
fore her marriage with me, also all the goods and jewels 
which I have given her since my marriage ; to my Lord and 
nephew the King * the best nouche which I have on the 
day of my death, my best cup of gold which my dear wife 
Katherine gave me on New Year's Day last, my gold salt* 
cellar with a garter, and the piece of arras which the Duke 
of Bourgoyne gave me when I was at Calais ; to my dear 
brother the Duke of York^, a gold cup and cover; to my 
dear son Henry, Duke of Hereford, Earl of Derby*, two of 
the best pieces of arras, one of which was given me by my 
Lord and nephew the King, and the other by my dear bro- 
ther the Duke of Gloucester % whom God pardon, when I 
lately returned* from Spain, also a chain of gold of the old 
manner, with the name of God in each part, which my most 
honored Lady and mother the Queen, whom God pardon, 
gave me, commanding me to preserve it, with her bless- 
ing, and 1 desire that he will keep it with the blessing of 

the Crown ; she was married to the Duke of Lancaster in January 
a^l «SS9, and died 10th May 1403. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 1 19. Her 
sister Philippa, married Geoffirey Chaucer the Poet. 

> WilUam Scrope, K. G. 

' Margaret Plantagenet, grand-daughter of King Edward L 

> The badge of the House of Lancaster. 

* Richard H. son of his eldest brother Edward the Black Prince. 

* Edmund of Langley, Duke of York. 

* Afterwards King Henry IV. 

7 Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, who died a short 
time before. 



143 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

God and mine; to my dear daughter Pfailippa, Queen of 
Portugal *, my second best stay of gold, and a gold cup 
and cover; to my dear daughter Katberine, Queen of Cas- 
tile and Leon% a gold cup and cover; to my dear daughter 
£lizabeth. Duchess of Exeter % my white bed of siik^ with 
blue eagles displayed, and my beat noaebe afker those be- 
fore given; to my dear son John Beaufort, Marquis of 
Dorset \ a dozen sancers, 8cc. ; to the Reverend Father in 
God and my dear sou the Bishop of Lincoln ', a dozen 
saucers, 8cc. and my missal, and my portheus, which be- 
longed to my Lord and brother the Prince of Wales, whom 
God preserve; to my dear son Thomas Beaufort % their 
brother, a dozen saucers, 8cc. ; to my dear daughter, their 
sister. Countess of Westmoreland and Lady of Nevil ', a 
silk bed, and a cup and cover of gold ; to my dear Henry*, 
eldest son of my dear son the Duke of Hereford, a gold 
cup; to my dear son John*, brother to the said Henry, a 
gold cup; after all my debts are paid, and restitution made 
to all who have been injured by me or my servants, on my 
account, I desire that my executor pay to the Minister of 
Bury one thousand pounds ; to my said wife Katherine 
two M /. ; to my said son the Duke of Hereford m 2. ; to my 
said son the Marquis m /. ; to my said son Thomas Beau- 
fort M marks ; '' a mon tres chere bachelier " Mons** Thomas 
Swyneford *** c marks ; to Monsr Walter Blount, Mons' 

' Philippa, who married John, King of Portugal. 

* His daughter by his second wife Constance, and wife of Henry 
in. King of Castile. 

3 His daughter by his first wife; she married John Holland, Earl 
of Huntingdon and Duke of Exeter. 

* His eldest son, by Catherine Swynford, who was created Earl 
of Somerset and Marquis of Dorset. 

' Henry Beaufort, the second son, afterwards Bishop of Win- 
chester and a Cardinal. 

* Thomas Beaufort, the third son, was created Earl of Dorset in 
1413, and Duke of Exeter in 1416. 

7 The second wife of Ralph Nevil, Earl of Westmoreland, K. G. 

* Afterwards Henry V, 

' His grandson, who became Earl of Kendal and Duke of Bedford. 
^^ Probably his son-in-law, his wife*8 son by her first husband, 
who was bom in 1368. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 143 

ChamberlaiD, c marks ; to Mods' Hugh Shirley c marks; 
to MoDsr Richard Aberbury, the sons, l marks; to 
Mods' William Par l marks; I will that a chauDtry be 
fouDded at the New Church of our Lady of Leicester, 
for the soul of my late wife Dame CoDstaDce, who is 
there, buried^ aud for ever to keep an obit for her 
soul on the 24th day of March ; and as for the annuity or 
annual pension of forty-thousand franks, which my dear 
son the King of Castile and Leon is bound to me^ a certain 
part of which is unpaid^ I devise to the King one third part 
of what may, by his assistance, be recovered of the arrears 
now due \ And I constitute and appoint the Reverend 
Fathers in God Richard Bishop of Salisbury*; John Bi- 
shop of Worcester'; my very dear and loving cousins and 
companions Thomas Earl of Worcester % Steward of the 
Household of my Lord the King; and William Earl of 
Wilts ^ Treasurer of England; my son Ralph Earl of 
Westmoreland; Monsr Walter Blount; Mods' John Da- 
brnggecourt; Mods' William Par; Mons' Hugh War*ton; 
Mons' Thomas Skelton; and John Cokey n, Chief Steward 
of my Lands ; Sir Robert Qwytby, my Attorney General ; 
Piers Melburn; William Ketyring; Robert Haylfield, 

' John of Gaunt relinquished his claim to the throne of Castile, 
in consideration of a certain annual sum to be paid him and Con- 
stance his Duchess ; but historians have much differed in fixing the 
exact amount. Vide a valuable note on this clause in the Duke's 
will in Royal WUis, p. 161. * Richard Metford. 

3 The following note relative to the Bishops of Worcester is 
taken from " Royal Wills/' p. 163: *^ This was John Green, whom 
the monks chose Bishop 1394, on the death of Wakefield, and 
whom Walsingham, p. 389, miscalls Robert Tideman, confounding 
him with Tideman de Winchcomb, whom the Pope, at the desire 
of Richard II. to whom he was Physician, obliged the convent to 
accept. This will therefore settle the list of Worcester Bishops, 
among whom John does not appear, though the King confirmed his 
election 4 Maii, 9 Pat. 18 XL II. m. 18, and he actually sat till the 
Pope translated Tidesman, who had not the temporalities till July 
81. I Pat. 19 R. II. m. 80. Godwin, ed. Richardson, p. 465.** 

< Thomas Percy, Lord Admiral. * William Scrope, K. G. 



144 T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Comptroller of my Household ; Sir John Leybum, my Re- 
ceiver General ; and Thomas Longley, Clerk, my executors. 
And I ordain my roost dear and entirely beloved brother 
Edmond Duke of York ; my most dear and entirely beloved 
nephew Edward Duke of Aumerle '; the Reverend Fathers 
in God Roger Archbishop of Canterbury* ; Richard Arch* 
bishop of York '; and the Bishop of Lincoln, my dear son% 
supervisors of this my last will, whom, with my Lord the 
King, I pray to be faithful surveyors of the same. In faith 
of which I have placed hereto the seal of my arms, and 
also my own signet, which I always carry myself, in the 
presence of the following witnesses: Maistre John Ke- 
nyngham. Doctor in Theology ; Sir John Newton, Parson 
of the Church of Burbach; Sir Walter Piers, Parson of 
the Church of Wymondham; William Harpeden, and 
Robert Symeon, Esquires; and by John de Bynbrok, of the 
Diocese of Lincoln, Notary. 

CODICIL TO THE SAID WILL. 

Item. John, son of the King of England, Duke of Lan- 
caster, whereas I have purchased divers manors, &c. 
before my marriage with my dear wife Catherine, to 
whom I have given several parts for her life, and I have 
enfeoffed my dear son John Beaufort, Marquis of 
Dorset, with certain other parts, 8u;. to my dear son 
Thomas Beaufort, brother of the aforesaid John, manors 
which belonged to Edward de Kendale, the reversion 
of which I have bought of Dame Elizabeth Crosier, also 
the lordships, &c. of which Dame Elizabeth Barry held for 
the term of her life, to him and the heirs of his body ; in 
default of which to my said son John, and the heirs of his 
body; failing which to my dear daughter Joan, their sis- 
ter. Countess of Westmoreland ; I will that my dear '' ba- 
chelier'' Monsr Robert Nevil, William Gascoigne, my dear 



■ Eldest son of the Duke of York. 

* Probably an error ; for Thomas Arundel was Archbishop of 
Canterbury from 1396 to 1414, and no person called Roger held 
that see for above one hundred years before or after the date of 
this will. ^^^.^V^^' ' Richard Scrope. * Henry Beaufort. 






TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 145 

esquires, Thomas de Radclyf, and William Kat'yng^ and 
my dear clerk Thomas de Langley, who, according to my 
directions, are enfeoffed in the Manor of Bernolswyk, in the 
County of York, pay annually to my executors for Dame 
Katharine del Staple xx marks for her life; and touching 
the wapentakes of Hangest, Hangwest, and Halykeld, in 
Richmondshire, which 1 have before granted to my dear 
son-in-law Ralph £arl of Westmoreland, and to my daugh- 
ter JoaU; his wife, for their lives, I will, 8cc.* 



WILLIAM EARL OF SALISBURY. 

William Montacute, Earl of Sarum, Lord of Man, and 
of the Isle of Wight ', at Christ Church, Twynham, 20th 
April, 1397, 20th Richard 11. My body to be buried in 
the Conventual Church of Bustlesham Montacute, founded 
by my Lord and father. I will that on every day until my 
corpse be brought there xxv s. be distributed to three hun- 
dred poor men ; likewise that twenty four poor people shall 
bear torches on my burial day, that each torch shall 
weigh eight pounds, and that each of the said men wear a 
gown of black cloth with a red hood ; also I will that there 
be nine wax lights and three morters of wax about my 
corpse, and upon every pillar in the Church a banner of 
my arms; I desire that xxx /. be given to sing trentals and 
for prayers for my soul ; to the finishing the building at 
Bustlesham, and to make a tomb there for my father and 
mother, and another for myself and my son * d marks ; to 
Elizabeth, my wife'; John Denken, Steward of my lands; 
William Drew. 

■ 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 145. 

* One of the founders of the Order of the Garter, and in the 50th 
Edward III. Admiral of the King*8 Fleet ; he died June 3d, 1397* 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 648. 

* His son Sir William, who was unfortunately killed in a tilting 
match by his father at Windsor August 6th » 1382. 

3 Daughter and coheir of John de Mohun, of Dunster. 

L 



146 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

SIR PHILIP D'ARCY, KNT. 

Philip D'Arcy, Knights April l6, 22 Richard II. 
139B. My body to be buried in the Priory of Gisborougb^ 
in the County of York, near to the grave of my father, and 
I will that five wax lights^ each of eight pounds weight, 
and twenty-four torches, shall burn about my corpse on my 
burial day, and of which torches, after my interment, I de» 
sire that two be given to the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin, 
at Gisborough, two to the Church of Rudby, two to the 
Chapel at Querlton, two to the Chapel of Hurst, two to the 
Chapel of Newton, two to the Chapel at Norton, two to 
the Chapel of Aldwerk^ two to the Chapel of Kirk by, two 
to the Church of Ekynton, two to the Church of Knayth, 
and two to the Church of Henyngs; to the fabrick of the 
Church of Querlton (without the Castle) xls.; for covering 
the Church of Torksey xls. ; to the Nuns of Fosse xl5.; 
to the Rector of the Church of Knayth xxwis, viiic2. ; to 
Philip, my son, a coat of mail of Milan; to Thomas, my 
son, a gilt cup with a cover, and crowns, which King Ed- 
ward gave me ; I will that xx s, be disposed of to make an 
image of St. Anne, of alabaster, to be placed on the altar 
of the Blessed Virgin at Henyngs ; and I desire that my 
executors expend ten pounds for a marble stone to be laid 
on my grave, with the image of myself and of Elizabeth, 
my wife*, fixed thereon *. 



ELEANOR DUCHESS OF GLOUCESTER. 
In the name, &c. I, Eleanor Duchess of Gloucester, 

' He was summoned to Parliament from the Ist to the Slst 
Richard II. in the 9th of whose reign he was constituted Admiral 
of the King's Fleet from the river Thames northward, and died on 
the morrow after St. George's day, 24th April 1398. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 373. 

* She was the daughter of Sir Thomas Grey, of Heton, Knight, 
who it appears died before him. 

* Collins' Peerage, vol. viii. p. 397, Ed. 1779. 



TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 147 

Countess of Essex, &c.' at my Castle of Plessy 9th of Au- 
gust, 1399. My body to be buried in the Church of the 
Abbey of Westminster, in the Chapel of St. Edmond the 
King, and St. Thomas of Canterbury, near the body of my 
Lord and husband Thomas Duke of Gloucester, and se- 
venth son of King Edward the Third. I will and ordain 
that on the day of my burial my executors order that my 
body be covered with a black cloth with a white cross and 
an escutcheon of my arms in the middle of the said cross, 
with four tapers round it, and four full mortars being at the 
four comers ; to the Abbess and Convent of the Sisters Mi- 
noresses near London without Aldgate yiL xiiis. iiud. 
and a ^' tonell" of good wine; to the Prior and Convent of 
Lanthony, near Gloucester xuiL viiu. vi^.; to Sir 
William Shuldon, Canon of the said place cs. ; to the 
Church and Abbey of Walden, where my Lord and 
father Humphrey de Bohun, late Earl of Hereford, of 
Essex, and of Northampton, Constable of England, is 
buried, a .vestment, 8cc.; I will that masses be said for 
my soul, and for the soul of Thomas, some time Duke 
of Gloucester, and that at each of the said masses, before 
the priest commences 'f Et ne nos,*' he pronounce with a 
loud voice, turning towards the people, ** for the soul of 
Thomas, some time Duke of Gloucester, and Alianore his 
wife, and all Christian souls, for charity paternoster;" to 
my Lady and mother the Countess of Hereford % a pair of 
paternosters of coral, 8lc. ; to my son Humphrey ' a bed of 

^ She was daughter and coheir of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of 
Hereford, Essex, and Northampton, Constable of England, &c. and 
her sister Mary being the wife of Henry, son of John of Gaunt, af- 
terwards Henry IV. became Queen of England ; she married Tho- 
mas of Woodstock, seventh son of King Edward the Third, who is 
supposed to have been murdered at Calais in September 13979 and 
died October 3, 1399. 

* Joan, daughter of Richard Earl of Arundel ; she died 7th 
April 1419. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 187- 

' He accompanied King Richard into Ireland, and was ship- 
wrecked, according to some authorities, but, according to others, 
died of the plague 1st Henry IV. Some curious particulars of this 

L 2 



148 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

black damask, and the staflT which was delivered to his ser- 
vants on his departure from London for Ireland, also a 
Chronicle of France in French, with two clasps of silver ena- 
melled with the arms of the Duke of Bourgoyne; also a book 
of Giles ''de regimine principum," a book of vices 'and 
virtues, and another poem * of the ** Historic de Chivaler a 
eigne %'* all in French, also a psalter well and richly illu- 
minated with the clasps of gold enamelled with white 
swans, and the arms of niy Lord and father enamelled on 
the clasps, and other bars of gold on the tissues in manner 
of mullets', which psalter was left me to remain to my 
heirs, and from heir to heir; Item, a coat of mail, with a 
cross of '' laton," which belonged to my Lord his father ; 
also a cross of gold pendant by a chain, with an image of 
the crucifix and four pearls round it, with my blessing as 
the thing of mine which I have best liked*; to my 
daughter Anne^, a book well illumined with the 'Megenda 
aurea" in French, also the best palfrey which 1 have; to 
my daughter Johanne^ a bed, &c. also a book with the 
psalter, primer, and other devotions, with two clasps of 
gold enamelled with my arms, which book I have often 
used, with my blessing; to my daughter Isabel ?, sister to 
the aforesaid Minoresses, a bed, 8cc. and a French Bible 
in two volumes, with two gold clasps enamelled with the 
arms of France; Item, a book of decretals in French, also 
a book of " meistre histoires," a book " de vitis patrum,'' 

nobleman will be found in the translation of a French metrical His- 
tory of the deposition of Richard II. in the 20th volume of the Ar- 
chsologia. } '< & un autre rimeie.'* 

^ A swan was the cognizance of her husband's family. 

> The Earls of Northampton bore three mullets on the bend in 
their arms, as a difference from the House of Hereford. 

4 '* Come chose du myen qe jay raieux amee.*' 

s Then aged 19 ; she married, first, Edmund Earl of Stafford, 
K. G. ; and, secondly, William Bourchier, Earl of Ewe, and left 
descendants by both husbands. 

' She was designed to have been the wife of Gilbert, son of 
Richard Talbot, of Irchenfeld, but died unmarried 1 Henry IV. 

7 Who was 16 years of age on St. George's day 23d April, I 
Henry IV. 1400, and was a nun in the Minories, London. 



TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 149 

and the '^pastorelx St. Gregory;'' Item, a psalter veil 
tanqe a la noctum de '' Exultate'' glosez, autre livre novel 
da psaatier gloses de la primer^ *' Domine exaudi'' tanqe a 
''omnia spiritus laudet dominum/' 8c sount les dites livres 
de Francois; and I appoint my executors and execu- 
trix Monsr Gerard Braybrok, the son ; Sybil Beauchamp ; 
John de Boys, Steward of my Household ; Sir NicoU Milx, 
Parson of Depden ; Sir Hugh Peintour, Chaplain of my 
free Chapel, within the Castle of Plessy ; Sir William Un- 
derwode, Parson of Dedisham; William Newbole; and 
Sir Robert Excestre, Prior of Crichurch, in London ; my 
dear cousin Mons' Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester ; and 
my faithful friend Sir Thomas Stanley, Clerk of the Rolls, 
Surveyors of this my will*. 



SIR GILES DAUBENEY, KNT.' 

Giles Daubeney, Knight, son and heir of Sir Giles Dau- 
beney. Knight, June 1st, 1400. My body to be buried 
in the porch of the Church of Kempston ; to Maud, my 
daughter; to Joane, my daughter; to Giles, my son ; to 
Thomas, my son; to Elizabeth, my daughter; Giles Dau- 
beney, Knt. my father; and Eleanor, my mother ; to Mar- 
garet, my wife ; My Manors of Kempston and Ingleby^ 
South Piderton, and Baryngton, and Palman*, and Usse, 
in Cornwall. And I appoint Thomas Daubeney and Wil- 
liam Daubeney, my brothers, my Executors. Proved No- 
vember 14th, 1403. 

SIR JOHN TRAILY, KNT, 
John Traily, Knight, " Maior Burgadalie," son of John 

* Printed at length in " Royal Wills," p. I77. 

' Ancestor of Henry second Baron Daubeney, who was created 
Earl of Bridgewater temp. Henry VIIL 

" Query, Polruan? Vide Lysons* Cornwall, p. 184. A William 
Daubeney was Sheriff of Cornwall in 31 Henry VI. and Giles Dau- 
beney in the 17th Edward IV. Gilbert*s Cornwall, vol. ii. pp. 352, 
353. 



150 TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA. 

Traily, Esqaire. My friend and brother Sir Richard de 
Barley, Sir Reginald Traily, natural son to him, and Dame 
Joan his wife. William Grevili, witness '. 



SIR WILLIAM ARUNDEL, KNT. 

William Arundel, Knight % at London, August Ist, 1400. 
My body to be buried in the Priory at Rochester, at the 
back of the high altar. The lxxx /. which King Richard 
promised me, and I was indebted to Rochester >, I will be 
paid at the discretion of my Lord of Canterbury ; my Lady 
of Hereford ; to my wife Agnes all my jewels ; to my carnal 
brother Sir Richard Arundel all my lands, and my vessels 
of silver; to our loving nephew Sir William Arundel, 
Knight. 



EDMUND DUKE OF YORK. 
Edmund Duke of York, Earl of Cambridge, and Lord 

' Copied verbatim from a note in Harl. MSS. 6148. There is 
no date stated, but as it stands between Wills dated in 1400 and 
1401 , it is presumed that it was written about those years. The 
obscure manner in which it is worded renders it difficult exactly to 
comprehend the degrees of relationship of the legatees ; it would 
appear, however, that Dame Joane was the testator's wife, Sir Re- 
gieald Trayley his legUimate son, for the word ** natural** cannot 
be construed into << bastard," and Sir Richard de Burley, his bro- 
ther-in-law. 

* There is some difficulty in ascertaining the relationship be- 
tween this Sir William Arundel and the Earls of Arundel ; but from 
his mentioning the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Countess of 
Hereford, it is pretty evident that he was of that family. John 
Lord Maltravers had a son William who was living in 1375, but it 
does not appear he had a son called Richard. The testator was 
probably a son of Sir John Arundel, whose will^ p. 105, mentions a 
daughter Joane, and other children ; in which case this Sir William 
would have been first cousin to the said Archbishop and Countess. 

' Query, '< to the Priory" of Rochester. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA^ 151 

of Tyndale S the 25th November 1400, and the 2d year of 
the reign of our ".tres redotes S^ Henry quart appres 
le conquest secounde." My body to be buried at Langley, 
near to Isabel ^ late my wife, whom God pardon ; and I 
pray my Lord the King to be Surveyor, and the Reverend 
Fathers in God the Archbishop of Canterbury ', the Bishop 
of Winchester ^ the Bishop of Durham % that they will' aid 
in the fulfilment of this my last will ; and to accomplish 
my said will I make and ordain my most dear son of Rutp 
land', and my dear Piers de Mawan, Steward of my 
Household; Sir Thomas Gerberge, Steward of my Lands; 
Mousr Thomas Wroston, my Chancellor; Henry Bracy, 
my Treasurer; Sir William Galandre; and Richard Al- 
cham, my Receiver, my Executors *• Proved at Lambeth, 
before the Archbishop of Canterbury, 6th October 1402, 
and in the 7th of his translation. 



ROBERT LORD SCALES. 

Robert Scales, Knight, Lord of Neucells % May 10th, 2 
Henry IV. 1400 •• My body to be buried in the Church 
of the Priory of Blakeburgb; to the Prioress and Nuns of 
Blackburgh. And I appoint Elizabeth Scales, my wife, 
my Executrix. Proved October 31st, 1403. 
■ ' ^ — 

' Edmund of Langley, fiflh son of King Edward the Third ; bom 
1341, and died August 1st, 1401. 

* Isabel, was his first wife, and daughter and coheir of Peter 
King of Castile and Leon, whom he married in 1372 ; she died in 
1394. ' Thomas Fitz-Alan, alias Arundel. 

* William of Wykeham. » Walter Skirlawe. 

* Edward Earl of Rutland, afterwards Duke of York, who was 
killed at the battle of Agincourt. 

» Printed at length in " Royal Wills," p. 187. 

' He was st. 14 in lo Rich. II. and was summoned to Parliament 
firom 20 Richard II. to 2 Henry IV. and died on Thursday the Eve 
of the Conception of our Lady 4 Henry IV. December 7, 1400. 
Dugdale^ vol. i. pi617. 

* May 12th, 1400, was in the Jirst of Henry IV. 



152 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



ELIZABETH LADY AUDLEY. 

Elizabeth Lady Audley \ at the Abbey of HiltoOy SOth 
September 1400. My body to be buried id the quire of 
Hilton Abbey, in the Chancel, in the tomb of my Lord and 
hnsband. I will that five large tapers, burn about my body 
on my burial day ; also five morters and sixty torches of 
wax of the largest size ; to the monks of Hilton four hun- 
dred marks to purchase lands for the Abbey ; to every Monk 
of that house forty shillings to pray for my soul, and for the 
soul of my husband, and for all Christian souls ; to my 
honourable Lord Sir Thomas, the King's son '; to my dear 
niece Joan de Beaumond five hundred marks to her mar- 
riage; to Sir William Peke; to William Nash c pounds; 
to Joan de Audley twenty pounds; to William Newport, 
twenty marks. 



ALICE LADY WYNDSORE. 

Alice, widow of William Wyndesor, Knight', at Up- 
mynster< on the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, August 
15th, 1400, 1 Henry IV. My body to be buried in the 
parish Church of Upmynster on the north side before the 
altar of our Lady the Virgin ; to the said Church one of my 
best oxen for a mortuary ; for wax to burn about my body 
forty shillings; for ornaments to the said Church ten 
marks; for repairing the highways near the town forty 
shillings'; I will that ten marks be distributed to the poor 

• Widow of Nicholas Lord Audley, and daughter of Alice de 
Beaumont, Countess of Boghan ; she died on the eve of St. Simon 
and St. Jude*s day October Q7th, 1400. 

" Thomas Duke of Clarence, second son of Henry IV. 

' She was the celebrated AJice Ferrers, who is mentioned in a 
former note. < August 16th. 

' In the abstract of this will in Collins' Peerage, vol. iv. p. 6S, 
this bequest is said to be to the '' repairs of the said Church." 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 153 

on the day of my sepulture ; to the Chaplain she marks ; 
to John Pelham, Sacrist of that Church, three shillings and 
four pence; to Joane, my younger daughter', my manor 
of Gaynes, in Upminster ; to Jane and Joane, my daugh- 
ters, all my other manors and advowsons which John 
Wyndsore, or others, have, by his consent, usurped, the 
which I desire my heirs and executors to recover and see 
them parted between my daughters, for that I say, on the 
pain of my soul he hath no fight there nor never had* ; my 
manor of Compton Murdac ; to the poor of Upminster xx 
shillings. And I appoint Joane, my youngest daughter; 
John Kent, Mercer of London, my Executors; and Sir 
John Cusson, Knight, and Robert de Litton, Esquire^ 
Overseers of this my will. 



THOMAS EARL OF WARWICK. 

Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick ', at Warwick 
Castle 1st of April 1400. My body to be buried in the 
Collegiate Church of our Lady of Warwick. To every 
town whereof I am Lord or Patron of the Church xx 
marks in money in the name of my principal % but if I de- 
part out of this life at Warwick, then I desire that the Col- 
legiate Church of our Lady there, shall have my best beast; 
for my funeral I will that there be three hundred pounds 
weight of wax, in six tapers and seven morters, which shall 
remain in the said Church ; also that sixty poor men in 



■ In the abstract in Collins* Peerage, " John, my youngest son/* 
but as Sir William de Wyndsore died without made issue, and as 
no former husband has been assigned to this Alice, the above ex- 
tract, which is taken from Harl. MSS. 6148, is probably correct. 

* This singular clause is omitted in Collins* abstract. 

' Knight of the Garter ; he died April 8th, 1401. Du^dale vol 
i. p. ^8. 

< Id. est. a mortuary. Ibid. 



154 T£8TAlfRNTA VBTUSTA. 

gowns made of white doth, cany each of them a torch at 
the solemnizing of my fnnera], and that forty of these 
torches after my exequies be finished, be distributed to the 
poor Churches of my patronage, the remainder to remain 
to the Collegiate Church of Warwick ; I will that all my 
friends attending my funeral shall have good entertain* 
ment, viz. a supper over night, and a dinner on the next day, 
and that money be distributed to the poor according to the 
discretion of my executors ; also I desire that thirty trentals 
be sung for my soul with all possible speed that may be 
after my decease, and likewise one thousand masses, viz. of 
the Trinity, of the HolyGhost,of the Nativity of our Saviour, 
of the Holy Cross, of the five Festivals of our Lady, of the 
Resurrection, of the Ascension, of Corpus Chrisd, of the 
Angels, of All Saints, and of Requiem, of every Feast sixty- 
seven masses, five in the whole excepted ; to my Lord the King 
an image of the Blessed Virgin, with two cruets, silver and 
gilt, made in the shape of two angels ; to the Archbishop 
of Canterbury ' a tablet of gold ; to the College of our 
Lady at Warwick before mentioned, a cross with the pe- 
destal silver and gilt, and enamelled with the story of our 
Saviour's passion, and a precious stone called a berill, 
bound with silver and enamelled, to put the host into ; also 
my best censer with a chalice, two cruets of silver gilt, 
with a bason and a piece pf silver enamelled ; to my Col- 
lege of Elmley a vestment ; to Richard^ my son and heir, 
my blessing and a bed of silk embroidered with bears ' and 
my arms, with all thereto appertaining, also a * * * 
wrought with the arms and story of Guy of Warwick, and 
the sword and coat of mail, which was that worthy 
Knight's, likewise the harness and ragged staves; also I 
will that the said sword and coat of mail, with the cup of 
the swan, and the knives and salt-cellars for the coronation 
of a King, shall be, and remain to my son and his heirs 

' Thomas Fitz-Alan, alias Arundel, was then Archbishop of Can- 
terbury. 

^ A bear and ragged staff was the cognizance of the House of 
Warwick. 



TESTAMSNTA VnHIOTA. 155 

after bim ; to my daag^bter Beauchamp my best nouche • 
to my brother of Bergavenny \ and my sisters of Suffolk * 
and CtiffE^rd^ and to my niece Katberine Beaucbamp, the 
mm at Sbouldham% to each of them some gift of mine, 
according to the liking of my executors, to the end that 
they may preserve my memory ; to my cousin le Despen* 
cer' a pair of paternosters of coral, with buckles of gold'; 
Sir Nicholas Lillinge, and John Daniel, my Chamberlain '• 



JOHN ROPER. 

John Ropere *, of the parish of St. Dunstan, without the 
suburbs of Canterbury, Thursday ' before the Feast of St. 
Baroaby the Apostle, 1401. My body to be buried before 
the high altar of St. Nicholas in the Church of St. Dun- 
Stan. To the repairing of the said Church x /. ; to the Vi- 
car XX s. ; to the Clerk vi s. vjn d, ; and I will that c marks 
be expended on my burial ; to the Priory and Convent of 
Christ Church at Canterbury xl marks; to the Abbot and 
Convent of St. Augustine of Canterbury xx marks ; to the 
Priory and Convent of St. Gregory of Canterbury x 
marks ; to the Friars Preachers of Canterbury v /. ; to Ed- 
mund Roper, son of Ralph Roper, of St. Dunstan's C5.; to 
Katberine, the wife of Edmund, my son, l marks, on con- 
dition that she does not hinder my executors in the disposal 



* William Baron Bergavenny, K. G. 

• Isabel, wife of William D'Ufford, Earl of Suffolk* 
» Maud, wife of Roger Lord Clifford. 

^ The daughter and coheir of Guy de Beauchamp, eldest bro- 
ther of the testator, who died v. p. Vide p. 63. 

^ Richard, his son and heir, married to his second wife, Isabel, 
daughter and heiress of Thomas Lord De SpensiSr. 

' From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 337* 

^ These persons are omitted by Dugdale, but mentioned in an 
abstract of this will in Hari. MSS. 6148. . 

^ Ancestor of Lord Teynham. » June 8. 



156 T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 

of my goods, Sec. in the manor of Bradlee ; to Alice, wife 
of Ralph Hoperxiiis. iv J.; to Richard Roper xiiis. mid.; 
to Catharine Yve, my handmaid * ; the residue of my goods 
to John Collyng*, senior, Ralph Roper, and Edmund Ro- 
per, my son, whom I appoint my executors. Proved at 
Canterbury April 1st, 1402. 



AGNES DE ARUNDEL. 

« 

Agnes de Arundel*, September 6th, 1401. My body to 
be buried in the Priory of St. Andrew's in Rochester, 
under the tomb where my husband and me are pictured ; 
to the Countess of Hereford ; to my Lady mother ; to my 
sisters the Ladies Ross and Brian, and Margaret Cobham ; 
to my brother Sir Richard de Arundel ; to Dame Margaret 
Felbrigge; to Dame Catherine St. Liz; to Dame Isauel 
Vache. 



RICHARD LORD SCROPE OF BOLTON. 

Richard Scrope, Lord of Bolton ^ at Pysho, August 2d, 
1401*, 2 Henry IV. My body to be buried in the Abbey 
of St. Agatha, near Richmond. To every parish priest, 
anniversary or chantry priest, in any of the parish churches 
of Richmondshire, coming to at my celebrating at my obit ii 
shillings ; to Roger, my son and heir, a pair of paternosters 

* Omitted in the abstract of this will in Collins' Peerage, vol. vii. 

p.71. 

* Sic in Collins* Peerage, but he is called '< John RoUyng the 
elder/* in Harl. MSS. 6148. 

' Apparently the widow of Sir William Arundel, whose will 
is inserted in p. 1 50. 

« First Baron Scrope of Bolton ; he was aged 18 in 19 Edward 
III. and died May 30th 4 Henry IV. anno 1403. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, 157 

of coral; to Stephen ', my son, my second sword; to Mill- 
sent', my daughter, a cup with cover gilt; to Margaret', 
the wife of Roger, my son, a gilt cup with cover; to Sir 
Stephen leScrope^, my kinsman, a gilt cup with cover; to 
Richard, my son, Archbishop of York*, my best cup; to 
Henry Lord Fit^-Hugh*, my kinsman, my best spice plate 
of silver. 



JOAN LADY BASSET. 

Joan Lady Basset % at my Manor House of Cheshunt, 
in the County of Bucks, 27th March 1402. My body to be 
buried in the Abbey of Lavenden, near Olney. 

' Ancestor of the Scropes, of Castlecomb^ co. Wilts. 

* Apparent his daughter-in-law, the wife of his son Stephen, and 
daughter and coheir of Robert Lord TiptofL 

' Daughter and coheir of Robert Lord Tiptoft. 

* Perhaps Sir Stephen Scrope, of Masham and Upsale, his first 
cousin once removed. 

* He was beheaded in 1405, for attempting to restore Richard 
IL to the throne. If Dugdale is correct in saying that Roger the 
half-brother of the Archbishop, and son and heir of the testator, was 
only thirty years old at his father's death in 1402, the Archbishop 
could not possibly have been born before 1373, which would only 
allow him to have been 15 years old when he was ordained Bishop 
of Coventry and Litchfield in 1386, and 24 when he was trans- 
lated to the archiepiscopal see of York. In the will of Ralph 
Lord Basset, dated in 1383, he is appointed one of his executors, 
which would hardly have been the case had he then only been be- 
tween 17 and 18 years of age. 

* Henry Lord Fitz-Hugh, K. G. was the son of Henry Lord 
Fitz-Hugh, who died 10 Richard II. by Joane, the daughter of 
Henry Lord Scrope, of Upsale, the first cousin, once removed^ of 
the testator. 

7 Widow of Ralph Lord Basset, of Drayton, and sister of John 
Duke of Brittany. Vide a note to p. 126. She died on Thursday 
next before the Feast of St. Martin, November 8^ 1403. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 382. 



158 TESTAM^NTA VETUSTA. 



SIR RICHARD WALDEGRAVE, KNT. 

Sir Richard Walgrave \ senior. Knight, at Smalbrag, 
April 22d, 1401. My body to be buried on the north side 
of the parish Church of St. Mary at Buers, near the body 
of Joan my wife; to the high altar of the said Church xxs.; 
to the Chapel of the Virgin Mary iii«. ivd.; to the Chan- 
try II15. IV d.; to every priest praying for my soul on the 
day of my burial xii cf.; to Richard, my son, a missal with 
a vestment and chalice ; to the parish Church of Walgrave 
a cope; to the Chapel of St. Stephen, in the parish of 
Buers, a missal now in London ; to my chantry of Polstede 
a vestment, and to the Friars of the Convent of Sudbury cs. 
to pray for my soul, the soul of Joan my wife, and the 
souls of my benefactors. And I appoint Master William 
Candysh, Rector of the Church of Bulmere, and Nicholas 
Blundel, my executors *. 



SIR THOMAS LATIMER, KNT. 

Thomas Latimer, of Bray broke*, ISth September 1401, a 

' Ancestor of the Earl of Waldegrave. He was Knight of the 
Shire for Suffolk 50 Edward III. and was Speaker of the House of 
Commons 6th, 7th, 10th, and 13th of Richard II. ; he died May 
2d, 1401. Collins* Peerage, vol. iv. p. 418. * Ibid. 

* Of whom Dugdale says, it was *< this Sir Thomas Latimer, of 
whom our historians make mention in 11 Richard II. being one of 
the most eminent persons of that sect called Lollards, then sprung 
up in this realm, which so increased as that in 18 Richard 11. hav- 
ing countenance from him, and divers persons of note, the King 
fearing an insurrection by them being then in Ireland, made what 
haste he could back for the prevention thereof. But before his 
death there is no doubt but diat he became a great penitent, as 
likewise did Sir Lewis Clifford,** and he draws the inference of his 
remorse from the humble manner in which he wrote his will ; 
within a few months after the date of which he died s. p. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 159 

false Knight to God, thaDking God of his mercy, haring 
such mind as he vouchsafeth ; desiring that God's will be 
fulfilled in me, and in ** godys/' that he hath taken me to 
keep; and to that make my testament in this manner. 
First, I acknowledge I am unworthy to bequeath to him 
any thing of my power, and therefore I pray to him meekly 
of his grace, that he will take so poor a present, as my 
wretched soul is, into his mercy, through, the beseeching 
of his blessed mother and his hoi v saints, and mv wretched 
body to be buried wherever I die in the next church-yard, 
God vouchsafe, and not in the Church, but in the utterest 
corner, as he is that is unworthy to lyn therein, save the 
mercy of God ; and that there be no manner of cost done 
about my burying, neither in meat, neither in drink, nor in 
no other thing, but it be to any such one that needeth it, 
after the Law. of God, save twey tapers of wax, and anon as 
I be dead, put me in the earth, 8u:/; to Edward my bro- 
ther; to Anne my wife. And I appoint Ann, my wife, and 
Sir Lewis Clifford, overseers of this my will. Proved 21st 
May 140^. 



ALMARIC LORD ST. AM AND. 

Almaric de St. Amand s, at my manor of Woodhay, on 
the Feast of St. George ' 1400. My body to be buried in 
the quire of the Friars Preachers at Oxford, near the grave 
of my first wife ; to John and Almaric, my sons. And I 
appoint Aleonora, now my wife> my executrix. Proved 8 
ides July « 1402. 

' So far from Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 33, but the remaining part is 
taken from a MS. abstract of this will. 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 6 Richard II. to 3 
Henry IV. inclusive, was made a Knight of the Bath 1 Henry IV^ 
and died on Thursday next after the Feast of St. Barnabas the 
Apostle, 14 June 4 Henry IV. anno 1403. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 21. 

5 April 23. « July 8. 



160 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



ANN LADY LATIMER. 

Ana Latimer % July 14, 1402. My body to be buried at 
Braybroke, beside the corpse of my Lord and husband Tho- 
mas Latimer. To Roger, my brother. And I appoint Sir 
Lewis Clifford, Knight, supervisor of this my testament. 
Proved 6 kalends Nov.* 1402, 



ROGER LORD SCROPE. 

Roger Scrope, Lord of Bolton ', at Bolton 2dd Septem- 
ber 1403. My body to be buried in the Abbey of St. Aga- 
tha, near Richmond ; to Richard, my son dnd heir, my pair 
of paternosters of coral with a jewel of gold which be- 
longed to my Lord my father, also a cross of gold which I 
usually carry about me, likewise a portfore and a missal, ac- 
cording to the use of York, which also belonged to my fa- 
ther, upon condition that they shall ever remain to the heirs 
male of my family; and in case Richard, the son of Rich- 
ar<l Lord Grey, of Wilton and Shurland, shall not consum- 
mate the marriage ^ between Maud, my daughter, and him, 
when be shall attain the age of xiv years, then I will that 
my executors shall make the best advantage of the marriage 
of the said Richard and of his lands, in regard he had his 
wardship K 

' Apparently the widow of Sir Thomas Latimer, whose will is in- 
serted in p. 158. * 27th October. 

^ He was summoned to Parliament 5 Henry IV. and died on 
Monday next after the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle December 
3d in that year. Having married Margaret, daughter and coheir 
of Robert Lord Tiptofl, and who, according to Blore*s History of 
Rutland, re-married in the 7th Henry IV. John Nixander. 

^ It does not appear that this marriage was consummated. 
• * Dugdale, voL i. p. 655, but it is evidently an imperfect abstract. 



TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. - l6l 



THOMAS MUSSENDEN. 

I, Thomas de Mussenden*, of the county of Lincoln ,« 
Esq. at Heling, in the said county, 20th July, 1402, and 
io the Sd year of the reign of King Henry IV. after the 
Conquest, make this my Will. Imprimis, I commend my 
soul, &c. and my body to be buried in the Church of the 
Friars Minors of Grymmesbey, befoje the high altar, 
if I happen to die in the county of Lincoln. To my exe« 
cutors XX marks, to cause three thousand masses to be said 
for my soul; to be distributed amongst poor people, for 
the good of my soul, c shillings ; to Johanna, my wife, all 
her apparel, together with all the ornaments for her body, 
and all jewels, &c. which she had at the time of her mar- 
riage, excepting one bed covered with ermine, which bed 
I bequeath to Thomas my son; and also one other bed, of 
black and red, which I will'be sold and disposed of for my 
soul; to the said Johanna, my wife, all my silver vessels, 
excepting one covered cup, which I bequeath to my said 
son Thomas; and excepting one goblet with a silver 
cover, which I bequeath to Dns Robert, Rector of the 
Church of Heljmg. Item, I will that Diis Thomas Hanslay 
have my cup of silver with a cover. Item, I will that the 
aforesaid Johanna, my wife, dispose of part of the vest- 
ments and ornaments of my Chapel for my soul, and for 
the soul of Beatrix, mother of the said Johanna, my wife. 
To Richard Chamberlayne, a long gown of skarlet furred 
with red gray. To Thomas Brunham, a piece of silver 
with a cover, marked with my arms ; to John Rak xiiimvJ. 
and a gown; to Walter Coke vis. viiicf. and a gown of 
russet without fur. Item, I bequeath c shillings to make a 
window of glass over the high altar of the Church of He- 
lyng aforesaid, with my arms in the said window. Item, I 

' Apparently Thomas de Mussenden, second son of Sir Thomas 
Musaendeh, of Mussenden, co. Bucks;' h^ married Johanna, 
daughter of Sir John Hawley, KnU and the descendants of Tho- 
mas his son were living in 1562. HarK MSS. 1550. 

M 



16S TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Will that all my arms, swords, bastard, and dagger, be sold 
and disposed of for my ^oul. And to this will I appoint 
the following to be my executors, viz. the aforesaid Jo- 
hanna, my wife, John de Skipwitb, Thomas de Burnham, 
William de Wymondeswold, Dnum Robert, Rector of the 
Church of Helyng, Thomas de la Chamber of Keleby, 
and Richard Chamberlayne. Item, I bequeath vi marks 
and a half, to celebrate in the Chnrch of Helyng for the 
soul of Beatrice Hawley. Also I bequeath xl$. to cele- 
brate for the soul of Dni Thomas Moubray, late deceased. 
To John Cowper viii d. To Dni John de Helyng vis. viii J. 
Also I will that my executors dispose, &c. for my children, 
viz. Arnold, my son, and Johanna, my daughter. Item, I 
bequeath to Richard Colman, my servant, vis. viiid.; to 
Thomas de Chamber vis^ viuJ. Item, I will that each of 
my servants assisting on the day of my burial have x\d. ' 



AGNES LADY BARDOLPH. 

Agnes Lady Bardolph*, widow of Thomas Mortimer, 
Knight, in the dwelling-house of the Earl of Oxford, in 
the parish of St. Augustines de Pappey, London, January 
9) 1403. My body to be buried in the Priory Church of 
the Holy Trinity without Aldgate, in the suburbs of Lon* 
don. And I appoint Henry Earl of Northumberland, and 
my >son, Thomas Lord Bardolph, supervisors of this my 

will. Proved 15th October, 1403. 

■ ■■■■■■ ■ ■ ■■ I ■ ■ 1 1 I I ■ I I — ■ ■ I . I It 1^1— 1» 

■ llie seal affixed to this will is copied in Lansdown MSS. SO/, 
whence the above Will is taken^ and was a cross engrailed, in 
the first quarter a bird, and inscribed, <' S. Thomee de Mussenden.*' 
The arms of Mussenden were, Or, a cross engrailed Gules, in the 
first quarter a bird Sable, beaked and legged of the second. Harl. 
MSS. 1550. 

* She was the daughter of Sir Michael Poynings, Knight, and 
married, first, William Lord Bardolph ; and secondly, Sir Thomas 
Mortimer, Knight, and died on Tuesday next aAer the Feast of 
^t. Barnabas, June IS, in the same year that she made her will. 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. eSS, states, that her second husband was Sir 
Roger Mortimer. 



>rESTAlkfENTA VETU8TA. l6S 



WILLIAM HERON, LORD SAY. 

William Heron', October SOtb, 1404. My body to be 
buried in the Church of that parish where I may depart 
this life. I will that Sir Robert Pebelow, Parson of West- 
bume, Sir Piers Vicar of Bourne, my feoflFees of the lands 
of Brewose, which fell to Elizabeth Lady Say, my wife, 
by inheritance, deliver all the said lands to her next heir 
on the side of the Brewose family. I charge my said feof- 
fees, as they will answer at the day of doom, to complete 
the hospital which is begun at the Church of Buckstead, 
for six or four poor men at the least, with a chantry priest 
to govern them, the which priest to have for his support x 
marks, and every poor man v marki; per annum. Whereas 
I have been a soldier, and taken wages from King Richard 
and the Realm, as well by land as by water, and peradven- 
ture received more than my desert, I will that my execu- 
tors pay six score marks to the most needful men unto 
whom King Richard was debtor, in discharge of bis soul. 
Also having been a soldier with the Earl of Arundel, and 
peradventure received more than I was worthy of, I desire 
ray executors to pay x pounds to the executors of that 
Earl, or to the poorest men to whom they may know of 
any debt being owing by the said Earl. And having like- 
wise been a soldier with the Earl of Northumberland, 
and received more than I deserved, I will that my said 
executors pay to the said Earl xx/.* Proved Dec. 12, 1404. 



* 'He was summoned to Parliament from the 17th Richard IL 
to the 5th Henry IV. inclusive, probably in right of his wife Eliza- 
beth^ widow of Sir John Fallesle, and sister and sole heir of John 
Lord Say; Dugdale, vol. i. p. 512 : but in p. 730 of that volume, it 
is said that he married Elizabeth^ cousin and heir to Joan, sister 
and heir of Thomas de Brewose, one of the daughters and coheirs 
of William Lord Say, in consequence of which alliance he had 
the title of Lord Say, though he was never summoned to Parlia- 
ment by that designation. 

* Dugdale, vol. i. p-. 790. 

M 2 



l64 TESTAMENT A VETUSTA, 



SIR LEWIS CLIFFORD, KNT. 

I, Lewis Clifford \ false and traitor to my Lord God, 
and to all the blessed company of Heaven, and unworthy 
to be called^ a Christian man, make and ordaine my testa- 
ment and my last will the 17th of September, 1404. y\t 
the beginning I, most unVorthy and God's traitor, recom- 
mend my wretched and sinful soul wholly to the grace 
and to the mercy of the blessful Trinity, and my wretched 
carrion* to be buried in the furthest corner of the church- 
yard in which parish my wretched soul departeth from my 
body. And I pray and charge my executors, a9 they will 
answer before Qpd, and as all my whole trust iq this mat- 
ter is in th^m, that on my stinking carrion be neither laid 
cloth of gold nor of silk, but a black cloth, and a taper at 
niy head, and another at my feet; no stone, nor other 
thing whereby any man may know* where m^ stinking 
carrion lieth '. And to that Church do my executors all 
things which ought duly in such case to be done, without 
any more cost than for poor men^ Also I pray my sur- 
veyors' and my executors, that any debt that any man 
can ask me by true title, that it be paid ; and if any man 
can truly say that 1 have done him any harm, in body or 
in goods, that they make largely his demand, .whilst the 
goods will extend. And I will also that none of my exe- 
cutors meddle or administer any thing of my goods with- 



' Knight of the Garter, and ancestor of the Lords Clifford of 
Chudleigh ; he is celebrated for having been seduced by the Lol- 
lards, but repenting of his apostacy he confessed his error to Tho- 
mas Archbishop of Canterbury ; and the contrite manner in which 
he speaks of himself in his will shews that his repentance was 
sincere. He died shortly after the date of his will. It is worthy 
of remark, that this Sir Lewis Clifford was very frequently ap- 
pointed an executor or supervisor of the wills of his contempora- 
ries, which allows the inference of his having been a man of ac- 
knowledged integrity. • Clepyd. ' Careyne. * Witt. 

"^ Liggeth. • «*Saafto pore men.'* ' Survivors. 






TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. l65 

out advice and consent of my surveyors, or some of them. 
Now, first, I bequeath to Sir Philip la Vache, Knight, my 
mass-book and my porhoos * ; and my book of tribulation to 
my daughter, his wife. The residue of my goods I bequeath 
to Philip la Vache, John Cheyne, and Thomas Clanvow, 
Knights, whom I likewise appoint surveyors of this my 
will ; and I constitute John Andrew, John Carleton, Wal- 
ter Gaytone, and Thomas Barbowe, my executors*. Proved 
December 5th, 1404. 



THOMAS MONTACUTE, DEAN OF SALISBURY . 

Thomas Montacute, Dean of Sarum*, May 6, 1404. My 
body to be buried at the foot of the tomb of Sir John Mon- 
tagu, Knight, my father, in the Chapel of the Blessed Vir- 
gin In the Church of Salisbury f. 



JAMES LORD BERKLEY. 

James Lord Berkley ', at Bristol, on the morrow after the 
feast of St. Dunstan ^ 1404. My body to be buried in the 
Abbey of St. Augustine's near Bristol, in the tomb of my 
Lord and father ; to find a priest to celebrate divine service 
there for the health of my soul, vi marks ; to James, my 
son, all my habiliments pertaining to war. And I appoint 
Isabel^, my wife, and James, my said son, my executors j;. 

* '< Portoos" in the abstract in Collins' Peerage. 

* Printed at length in Dugdale^s Baronage, vol. i. p. 341, and in 
Collins* Peerage, vol. vii. p. 156. 

* Brother of John third Earl of Salisbury ; he died August 3 Ist, 
1404. t Collins* Peerage, vol. ii. p. 66. 

s He died 13th June 6 Henry IV. « May 80th. 

' Daughter and heir of Sir John Bloet, Knt. and of the Lady 
Katherine Wogen his wife. Dugdale says her name was Eliza- 
beth, but sometimes written Isabel ; but from her husband calling her 
Isabel in his will it is pretty certain that such was her real name. 

I Dugdale, vol. i. p. 361. 






166 TBSTAMBNTA VBTUSTA. 



ELIZABETH LADY STAFFORD. 

Elizabeth Lady Stafford*^ September 8tb, ^405. My 
body to be buried in the Cbapel of St. Andrew, in the 
Abbey Church of Abbotsbury, in the tomb of Sir Jofan 
Maltraversy Knight, late liiy husband. To the Rector of 
St. Giles at Stapelford, for his tif hes forgotten and not paid; 
and also to celebrate a thousand masses for my soul and 
the souls of my ancestors four pounds three shillings and 
four pence ; to the Friars of Dorchester four pounds three 
shillings and four pence; to the Friars of Yevel, and to the 
Monks of Abbotsbury the same sum each; to three priests 
celebrating for my soul and the souls of my ancestors, as 
likewise for the soul of Sir John Maltravers, Knight, my 
late husband (whereof I will that two officiate in the Ch«ireh 
of Hooke, or Stapelford, and the third in the Chapel of 
Kentercombe the next year after my decease), fifteen 
pounds ; viz. to each of them one hundred shillings ; to 
Humphrey Stafford and Elizabeth, his wife, my daughter*, 
twelve dishes and six saucers of silver; to Katherine Cob- 
ham, the wife of Humphrey Stafford, a cop of silver gilt. 

* Daughter anid heir of ... . Dynham, and at the time of making 
her will she was the wife of Sir Humphrey Stafford, of Hookc, 
called Humphrey Stafford with the silver hand, who survived her. 
Her first hvsband was Sir John Mdtravers, of Hooke, co. Dorset, 
Knight. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 179. 

* Dugdale's words are ** her own daughter," and from his state- 
ments under Stafford ef Heokcy and under Makf avers, in vol.- ii^ p. 
102, it would appear that the testatrix had a daughter by her first 
husband Sir John Mahraven, called EMzabeCh, who Was her heir ; 
and that she married Sir Hun^phrey Stafford, Knt. he^^n by Sir 
Humphrey Stafford with the silver hand, her second husband ; in 

*^ ^^^^f^Zj which case the said Elizabeth Maltravers must have married her 
rj V t^ifm ,i \ half-brother, which is scarcely credible. The fact probably was 
that Sir Humphrey Stafford with the silver hand married ^ttw Wives, 
and that by hiB first wife he had Sir Humphrey, who married Eliza- 
beth Maltravers, the daughter of his second wife^ the testatrix, by 
her first husband ; though Dugdale does not assigti any other wifb 
to Sir Humphrey with the silver hand, than the said Elizabeth. 



:! 



TEgnUiMSSTA VBTUSTA. l67 

And I constitute Sir Humphrey Staiford, Knight, my bus- 
band, my executor *. 



SIR THOMAS WEST, KNT. 

TbooMia West, Knight'. April 8, 1405. My body to be 
buried in the new Chapel in the Minster of Christ Church, 
Cwynebam. To the work of that Church one hundred 
pounds ; to the treasury there one hundred pounds, on 
condition that once in every year the Canons shall so- 
lemnly keep theminde* of Thomas my father, Alice my 
mother, my own, and Joaa my wife's minde. For 
masses for my soul xviii/. xviiis. iiii(2. to be fulfilled 
within half a year aftev my decease. To Joane, my daugh- 
ter, M/.t 



RALPH COBHAM, ESQ. 

Ralph Cobham, of Kent, Esquire, January 1, 1402. My 
body to be buried in the Collegiate Church of Cobham. 
To William Cobham, my "neposV * To Elizabeth, my 
wife. Proved 8th October, 1405 {. 



^ Dugdale, voLi. p. 172> 

* He was summoned to Parliament 9 and 6 Henry IV. and 
died on Easter day April 10th, 1405. 

• Obit. 

f From the abttraci in DugdSle's Baronage, vol. ii. p. 140. 

4 QuQry, grandson or nephew? 

I It is doubtful whether the probate is not dated in 1403 instead 
of 1405, as the last figure in the MS. from which this will is taken is 
illegible. 



168 TESTAMRNTA VETUSTA. 



SIR STEPHEN SCROPE, KNT. 

Sir Stephen Scrope, Knight', January 6, 1405. My 
body to be buried in the Abbey of St. Agatha, near Rich- 
mond, by the tomb of my father. To Milisent% my wife, 
two basons and ewers of silver; to Stephen, my son and 
heir, two basins and ewers of silver, and a long sword 
which was King Edward's, and given by him to my father. 
To Elizabeth, my daughter, for her marriage, ccc marks*. 



SIR ROGER BEAUCHAMP, KNT. 

Roger Beauchamp, Knight', at New Sarum, 24th April, 
1406. My body to be buried in the Church of the Friers 
Preachers of Fisherton, near Sarum. To the building of 
the Church of Bletsho, ins. iv^. Proved 30th June, 1406. 



THOMAS LORD FURNIVAL. 

Thomas Lord Furnival*, March 12, 1406. My body to 
be buried in the Church of the Priory of Wirksop, and 

* Of Bentley, co. York, a younger son of Richard Lord Scrope 
of Bolton, and ancestor of the Scropes of Castlecomb, co. Wilts. 
Blore*s History of Rutland. 

* Daughter and coheir of Robert Lord Tiptoft. 

* Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 655. 

' Apparently the son of Roger Lord Beauchamp^ of Bletsho, 
mentioned by Dugdale, vol. i. p. 251, as doing his homage? Rich- 
ard II. and attending the King into Ireland 18 Richard II. whose 
son and heir John did homage for his lands 8 Henry IV. 

^ Thotnas Nevill, brother of Ralph first Earl of Westmoreland, 
K. G. who having married Joane, the daughter and heir of Lord 
Furnival, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Furnival ; he died 
8 Henry IV. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 301. 



testamenta vetusta. 169 

without any great pomp. To the King, my best cup of 
gold with a cover; to the fabrick of the steeple of Wirk- 
sop xl/.; to the Lady Alice Deincourt', my sister^ cc/.; to 
John Talboty and Maud his wife*, my best bed, with all 
the furniture thereto belonging. . I will that my feoffees of 
my lands in Wirksop cause my obit to be solemnly 
kept every year in the Priory Church of Wirksop with 
placebo, and dirige and mass of requiem by note **. 



MARGARET COUNTESS OF WARWICK. 

Margaret Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick », 28th No- 
vember, 1406. My body to be buried in the Collegiate 
Church of Warwick ; and I will that at my burial there be 
five tapers, containing five pounds of Wax, burning about 
my corpse, from the beginning of service on the eve before 
my funeral till the high mass of requiem on the morrow 
after ; and at the same time that there be twenty torches 
held burning by twenty poor men about my hears^, but 
which are afterwards to remain for the high altar, and 
other altars of that Church, for the honour of God, accord- 
ing to ancient custom and right f* 



> Who married William Lord Deincourt. 

* Whom Dugclale, in a parenthesis, says was ** his own daugh- 
ter ;** John Talbot her husband, became the first Earl of Shrews- 
bury. * Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 301. 

s Widow of Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, K. G. and 
dfiughter of William Lord Ferrers of Groby ; she died January 
f22, 1407> Dugdale, vol. i. p. ^8. 

f Dugdale's Abstract. Ibid. 



170 TXnAMBNTA TBTUSTA. 



SIR WILLIAM BONVILE, KNT. 

Williani Bonvile, Knight ^, Saturday * before thq Feaat 
of the A88i»a»ptiiM> of Our Lady^ 1407. My body to bo 
buried before the high cross ia the Church of Nyweaham, 
in the eoanfey of Devon. To the said Chucch xhl. for 
licence for myself and my wives to be buried therein^ and 
also to pray for my soul. I will that my executors give 
ccc marks for leave to amortize lands of the annual value 
of L marks, for the endowment of an hospital for twelve 
poor men and women^ in Combe-atreet^ within the city of 
Exeter, there to be maintained for ever, and for the better 
suppoit thereof, and for the honour of God^' I bequeath to 
the said hospital all my rentsi within that city, excepting my 
awn mansion-house there. To Alice^ my wife, the said 
mansion4iouse for term of her life^ after which to the heirs 
male of my body ; also n marks in money, and half of my 
silver vessels. To Anne, my sister,, a nun at Wherwell, x 
marks;, to William, my yoimger sconce marks towards his 
marriage. Proved l&th April, 1408i*- 



FULK FITZWARINE. 
Fulk Fitzwarine', at Whittington, Sunday « next before 



' He was Sheriff of Somarset and Dorset 4 Richard II. and of 
Pevon 13 Richard IL; his grandson Williain was saramoned to 
Parliament 9B Henry VL Diigdale, vol. iL p. 936. 

* August ISth. 

* Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 336. 

\ Dugdale says he was not then of full age, and that he died on 
the eve of All Saints, 2d November, next ensuing. The above 
abstract of his will is partly taken from Dugdale, and partly from 
a MS. ; the former omits noticing that the Eh'zabeth mentioned 
therein was << Elizabeth D'na Botreaux/'and the latter says nothing 
of Anne his wife. « October 30th. 



171 

tbe Feaist of All Stm^, 1407* To Elizabeth Lady Bo*, 
treauz all jqr famdB and goods in England, and in> tEe 
MbicIks of Wales, to be disposed of foe tbe health; of my 
9onl, and tbe soals of miy parents. And I appoint the said 
Eliaabeth, and Anne my wife, exeeutiixcs of this my wilL 
Proved Jane fiO,. 1407. 



SIR PHILIP LE VACHE, KNT. 

Philip la Vache, Knight », April 25, 1407. My body to 
be buried in the Church of St. Giles of Chalfhunt. To 
Elizabeth my wife. Proved 10th October, 1407. 



WILLIAM LORD BERGAVENNY. 

William k fiea«cbanQp> Lord of Bergavenny *, April 9;5, 
1408. My body to be buried in the Church of the Friars 
Preachers at Hereford, next and beneath the tomb of John 
de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke. I will that five tapers be 
bung about my body as soon as may be after my decease, 
and that twenty-four poor men be cloathed in black, and 
that each of them carry a torch, receiving two pence a 
piece for that service. To the place of my burial twenty 
marks or more, as my executors shall think fit ; for the 
charges of my funeral one hundred pounds ; I desire that 
ten thousand masses be said for my soul in all possible haste 
after my death by the most honest priest that can be found; 
and that four good priests be found for ten years to sing 



* Query, if not elected a Knight of the Garter temp. Richard 
II. and the 73d Knight of that Order? Vide Buswell, p. es. 

* Knight of the Garter, and brother of Thomas Earl of War- 
wick, K. G. ; he was summoned to Parliament as Baron of Berga- 
venny from 16 Richard II. to 8 Henry IV. and died 9th May, 12 
Henry IV. 



172 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

fot my soul and for the soul of my Lord Sir John Hastings, 
Earl of Pembroke, and for all the souls to whom I owe obli* 
gation; to the poor tenants within my Lordship one huu' 
dred pounds ; to Joan, my wife S a p&ir of basons covered 
and over gilt, having the arms of Warwick and Arundel 
impaled thereon; to Richard, my son, my best sword and 
harness for the justs of peace, which belonged to war; to 
Joane and Elizabeth, my daughters, one thousand marks 
each for their marriage. And I constitute Thomas Arun* 
del. Archbishop of Canterbury ' ; Thomas Earl of Arun. 
deP; and Joane, my wife, my executors *• 



ELIZABETH LADY ZOUCH. 

Elizabeth Lady Zouche^, on the Feast of St. Ambrose' 
1408. My body to be buried in the Abbey of Tewksbury, 
where the bodies of my brothers are buried ; to that house 
XX /.; to Edmund and Thomas, my sons, all my silver ves- 
sels to be equally divided between them '^^ 



* Who was daughter of Richard sixth Earl of Arundel, K. G. 
and sister and coheir of Thomas seventh Earl of Arundel, K. G. 
Vide her will in a subsequent page. 

' His wife*8 uncle. > His brother-in-law. 

« " With others." Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 239. 

^ In some MS. authorities she is said to have been the daughter 
of Thomas Lord Roos, of Hamlake, and married, first, to William 
Lord Zouche, who died 5 Richard IL ; and secondly, Thomas 
Lord Clifford, who lefl her a widow 15 Richard IL Her stating 
in her will that her brothers were buried in Tewksbury Abbey 
renders the assertion of her being the daughter of Lord Roos 
somewhat doubtful, for Rievault, in Yorkshire, was the usual place 
of interment of the Roos family. 

* April 4th. * From Dugda]e*s Abstract, vol. L p. 691. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 173 



SIR THOMAS MOLYNTON, KNIGHT. 

Thomas de Molynton, Knight, Lord of Wemme*, on 
the nones of May % 1408. My body to be buried in the 
Chapel of the Brothers of the Holy Cross, London. To 
Thomas de Molynton, my son ; to William de Molynton, 
'' nepoti meo > ;" to Agnes, sister of the said Thomas, to 
her marriage; to Robert de Molyntony my brother; to 
Elizabeth, wife of the said Robert de Molynton ; to Eliza- 
beth my wife; to Johanna Grauncester, my daughter. I 
will that my manor of Oldesforth be sold. And I appoint 
Elizabeth my wife my principal executor. 



JOHN LORD LOVEL AND HOLLAND. 

John Lord Lovell and Holland «, at Wardour Castle, co. 
Wilts, on the morrow ^ next ensuing the Feast of St. James 
the Apostle, 1408. My body to be buried in the Church 
of the Hospital of St. John at Brackley, in the county of 
Northampton, to which I bequeath a vestment of black 
adorned with stars of gold ; also certain copes and other 
things thereunto appertaining, of the same suit and colour. 
I will that Maade, my wife, dispose of part of my goods 
for the health of my soul ; whom, with John, my son, and 
Sir Humphrey Stafford, I constitute my executors. Proved 
September 12th, 1408 'f^. 



' The second husband of Elizabeth Boteler, widow of Robert 
Lord Ferrers, of Wemme. Vide her will in a subsequent page. 

* May 7th. ' Query, grandson or nephew ? 

* Knight of the Garter. He was summoned to Parliament 49 
Edward III. and married Maud, the daughter, and ultimately 
heiress of Robert de Holand, who survived him ; he appears to 
have died soon after the date of his will. 

' July 96th. * .Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 559. 



174 TE8TAMENTA VBTUSTl. 



JOHN BEAUFORT, EARL OF SOMERSET. 

John Beaufort, late Earl of Somerset, Chamberlain of 
England, and Captain of Calais ', on the l6th of March, 
1409% in the Hospital of the Blessed Virgin, near the Tower 
of London, being at the point of death, made his nonca- 
pative will in manner following. He bequeathed to Hienry 
bis brother, by the grace of God Bishop of Winchester^, 
all;his goods, after the payment of his debts; and whom 
he also appointed his executor, and Margaret his wife* su- 
pervi0or of his said will. Witnessed by Richard Gardi* 
ner, ''hostiario camere ** to the said testator, John Boys, 
*'domicello," Thomas Herdi, John Forest, John Foray, 
and many others. Proved 5th April, 1410 '*^. 



ELIZABETH LADY DESPENSER. 

Elizabeth de Barghersh, Lady Despenser^ July 4, 
1409- My body to be. buried in the Church of Our Lady 
at Tewksbury, betwixt my lord and husband, Edward Lord 
Despenser, and my son, Thomas le Despenser*. I desire 
that I be buried within three days after my decease, and 
that a black cloth with a white cross be laid over my body, 



^iT*»^i— ' .H I ■■* « f > I ■ ■ " » I < » I 



* Knightof the Garter; he was the eldest natural son of John 
of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and was legitimated by act of parlia- 
mant, and created Earl of Somerset 20 Richard II. and Marquis 
of Dorset^ but which title he relinquished 1 Henry IV. and died on 
Palm Sunday March 16th, 1410. ' 1409^10. 

> Henry Beaufort, afterwards a Cardinal. 

« Sister and coheir of Thomas Holland, Earl of Kexit. 

* Royal Wills, p. 208. 

^ Daughter and heiress of Bartholomew Lord Burghersh^. K« G« 
and widow of Edward Lord Despenser, K- G. who died 49 Ed- 
ward III. 

' Who was beheaded for attemptiag to restore Richard II. Sth 
January 1 Henry IV. 1400. 



TBSTAMSKTA VETUSTA. 175 

with five tapers about it, and no more, during tbe office of 
burial. Likewise^ that a stope of marble be placed over 
my grave, with mj portraiture thereoik* Also I will that 
seven of the most honest priests that can be found sing for 
me for one whole year next after my death, and that each 
of them for so doing receive five pounds : and I desire that 
one thousand masses be sung for my soul. To the Lady 
Morley, my daughter *, my best chalice; to the Lady Mar-- 
garet Ferrers, my daughters two chargers and twelve 
dishes of silver; to Philippa, my daughter, a bed of red 
worsted, with all tbe furniture appertaining thereto; to 
Elizabeth ', daughter to the aforesaid Margaret, two other 
chargeons, twelve dishes, and six saucers of silver. Proved 
ijOth Aagnst, 1409'*^. 



ELA LADY ST. MAUR. 

Ela, widow of Sir Richard St. Maur the elder «, Novem- 
ber 28th, 1409. My body to be buried in the new Chapel 
of Stavedale Priory, next to the grave of Sir Richard St. 
Maur, late my husband. To my son Nicholas xx/.; to 
my son John a set of beads garnished with gold f. 



* Anne, who married, first, Hugh Hastings; and secondly, 
Thomas Lord Morley, K. 6. 

* Wife of Robert Lord Ferrers of Chartley. 

* " Her grand-daughter.** Dugdale. 

* Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 39€. 

* She was the daughter and coheir of Sir John St. Lo, Knight, 
and married Sir Richard St. Maur, Knight, who was summoned to 
Parliament from 4 Richard H. to 2 Henry IV. and died the 15th 
May 1401 ; she died shortly after the date of her will. Dugdale, 
vol. ii. pp. 89, 90. 

t From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii, p. 90. 



176 TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



WILLIELMA LADY DE ROCHES. 

Willielma de Roches*. My body to be buried in the 
Parish Church of Bromham, near my lord and husband, 
John Roche, Knight. And I appoint my son, Walter 
Beachamp, supervisor of this my Will. Proved 22d No- 
vember, 1410. 



JOHN HOWARD. 

John Howard % son of John Howard, Knight, 4th Sep- 
tember, 1409. My body to be buried in Holy Sepulture. 
And I appoint the Countess of Hertford, and John 
Howard, Knight, my father, my executors. Proved 26th 
October, 1410. 



MARGARET COURTENAY, LADY ST. LAUDO. 

Margaret Courtenay'. My body to be buried in the 
Cathedra] Church of Bath, near the body of John St. 

* A note to this will in the MS. whence the aboire abstract is taken 
remarks, that Bromham, co. Wilts, was the mansion of William 
Beauchamp Lord St. Amand, her son ; and in an account of the 
Barons of St. Amand, in Banks' Extinct Peerage, vol. ii. p. 507, 
Walter, a younger son of John Lord Beauchamp, of Pewyk, is 
said to have married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir John 
Roche, Knight ; hence it appears that William Beauchamp Lord 
St. Amand was her grandson. Dugdale does not mention who 
this Walter Beauchamp married, but the Will of Lady Roche 
in the text confirms the statement first cited. 

* Query, if the Sir John Howard who married Joan, the daughter 
of Sir Richard Walton, Knight, and who died vita patris 1 409, on a 
journey to the Holy Land ? Vide Collins* Peerage, vol. i. p. 36. 

> There is some diflBculty in ascertaining who this Margaret 



T£dTAM£NTA. VfiTUSTA. 



177 



Laudo, my husband. To William Lord Botreaux ; to 
Elizabeth, my daughter, wife of the said William; to 

Courtenay was ; for no match with St. Laudo or St» Lo, occurs in 
the pedigree of that f^ily ; but it is pretty evident that she was 
either the daughter or the widow of some member of that illus- 
trious house. In Dugdale*s account of the Lorfls Botreaux, vol. 
i* pp. 6Q9f CSO, he states that William Lord Botreaux, who died 
in die 15th Richard II. 139 1» married Elizabeth, the daughter and 
heir of Sir John St Lo, which might agree with the statements in 
tlie will, for although it was proved in 1411, itls possible that it was 
dated twenty years before ; if this was not the case (for the MS. 
whence it is taken does not contain the date), Dugdale must be in* 
correct in saying that the William Lord Botreaux in question died 
in the 15th of Richard II. There is however such discrepancy in 
his account of the Botreaux family, that much reliance cannot be 
placed on it ; this will sufficiently appear from the following contra- 
dictory pedigree, which is deduced from the different relations in 
pages GZSf 630, and 631. 

Elizabeth,==:William Lord=pElizabeth, dau. of Margaret d 



daughter 
and heir 
of John 
StLo* 



Botreaux, I SirRaufeDaube- 



died on the 
Feast of St. 
Laurence 
loth Aug. 
I391> 15 
Richard II. 



me; marr. m or 
before 48 E. III. ; 
founded a chan- 
try 4 Henry V. 
1416, and died 11 
Henry VI. 143«. 



St.Lo, whose 
obit was to 
be kept on 
the 3d of 
every Janu- 
ary. 



William, son and heir, set. 23 at his fa-=Elizabeth,who appointed 



ther*s death in 1391 ; died 25th May 
following; his obit to be kept on 
every 25th of May. 



her obit to be kept on 
the 4th of every Septem- 
ber. 



Margaret,=:William, son and heir, set. 5» I392,=pElizabeth, dau. 



his wife in 
37 Henry 
VL 



found heir to his grandmother Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Sir Ralph 
D'Aubenie 11 Henry VI. 1432, 
then aged 40 years ; summoned to 
Parliament from 'the 1 1th to the 
38th Henry VI. ; ob. 2 Edw. IV. 



of John Lord 
Beaumont, first 
wife, ob. ante37 
Henry VL 



Margaret, daughter and heir ;=pSir Robert Hungerford, 
ob. 17 Edward IV. 1477. 4^ Knt. 

From the Will in the text, added to the best authenticated state- 
ment in Dugdale's account, it is evident that Elizabeth, the 

N 



178 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Margaret de Botreauz, my daughter » ; John de St. Laudo, 
late father, and Elizabeth his wife, mother of John de St. 
Laudo, my husband. And I appoint William Lord Bo- 
treaux, my son, my executor. Proved January 26th, 141 1. 



SIR JOHN BEAUCHAMP, KNT. 

John Beauchamp, senior, son and heir of Roger Beau- 
champ*, February 21st, 1411*. To Catherine, my sister, 
forty pounds for her marriage; to Margaret, my daughter, 
twenty pounds. And I appoint Editha, my wife, my exe- 
cutrix. Proved 10th December, 1414. 



ELIZABETH LADY BEAUCHAMP OF POWYK. 

Elizabeth Beauchamj), of Powyke*, September Sd, 1411. 
My body to be' buried in the cemetery nearest to the place 
where 1 may die. To Lord William Beauchamp, my son, 
a cup of silver. And I appoint Walter Beauchamp, my son, 
supervisor of this my Will. Proved 26th September, 14U« 



daughter and heir of Sir John de St. Lo, Knt. and Margaret 
Coiirtenay his' wife, married William Lord Botreaux, the father of 
the last Lord, instead of her being 'bAS grandmother i but there is 
great doubt if he died so soon after his father ; for it is not very 
likely that this will should have been dated twenty years before it 
was proved ; and it is still less probable that it was made within the 
few months in which, according to Dugdale's statement, he could 
have been styled << Wiiri D'ni Botreaux.'* 

■ Probably grand-daughter. 

" This Sir John appears to have been the son and heir of Sir Ro- 
ger Beauchamp of Bletsho, whose will is inserted in a former page. 
Vide Dugdale, vol. i. p. «62. » Query, 1411-1« ? 

« Apparently the widow of Sir John Beauchamp, of Powyke, 
who was living 3 Richard II. and who left two sons, Sir William 
de Beauchamp, ancestor of the Lords Beauchamp of Powyk, and 
Sir Walter, from whom the Lords St. Amand descended. Dug- 
dale, vol. i. p. 1249. 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA* 179 



ELIZABETH COUNTESS OF KENT. 

Elizabeth Jaliers, Countess of Kent^ at BedhamptOQ, 
Monday 20th April 1411, 12th Henry IV. My body to 
be buried in the Church of the Friars Minors in the City 
of Winchesteri in the totnb of John late Earl of Kent, late 
my husband. To divers churchesi to pray for the soul of 
the said John, and all the faithful deceased. To my dear 
sister Alice, Countess of Kent% a large portiforum : and I 
will that after her decease she dispose of the said book to 
pious purposes, for the health of her soul and mine ; to 
Joan ', Countess of Kent, a small missal and a large le- 
gend; to the Prioress of Moreton; my manor of Bed- 
hamptoQ* And I appoint Henry Beche, John Mersedon, 



' She was the daughter of the Marquis of Juliers, and married 
j#^^ WbtBoad Plantagenet, Earl of Kent, son and heir of Edmund Plan- 
tagenet, younger son of King Edward I. Her husband died 26 
Edward III. s. p. and she took the veil at Waverley, in the dio- 
cese of Winchester, but afterwards clandestinely married Sir Eu- 
stace Dabrischecourt, Knt. for which breach of her religious vow 
the Archbishop of Canterbury inflicted a severe penance on her ; 
amongst other injunctions, that the said Sir Eustace and she should, . 
the next day " after any carnal copulation had betwixt them, com- 
petently relieve six poor people, and both of them that day abstain 
from some dish of flesh or flsh whereof they did most desire to eat ; 
and likewise that the said Elizabeth should once every year go on 
foot to visit that glorious martyr St. Thomas of Canterbury, and 
once every week during her life take no other food but bread and 
drink, and a mess of potage, wearing no smock ; and specially in 
the absence of her husband.*' She died Qth June 1411. Dugdale, 
vol. ii. pp. 94, 95. 

' Alice, daughter of Richard Earl of Arundel, K.G. and widow 
of Hiomas Holland, Earl of Kent, K. G. ; it would appear from 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 76, that she was dead the Slpt Richard IL 
1397-8, but this will proves the contrary. 

> Joan, daughter of Hugh Earl of Stafford, K. G. and widow of 
Thomas Duke of Surrey and Earl of Kent, who was beheaded at 
Cirencester 1 Henry IV. ; she died 5th October 21 Henry VI. 
1442* Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 77* 

N 2 



180 lUTAMENTA VBTU8TA. 

Chaplain, Gilbert Bammebury, and John Gyleft, my exe- 
cutors. Witnessed by the Prior of Soutbwyke, John Uve- 
dale, Bernard Lucas, Thomas Coke Rector of the Church 
of Bedhampton, Thomas Pulter, Rector of the Church of 
Wykeham, and others. ' Proved sgth June 1411'*^. 



ELIZABETH LADY FERRERS, OF WEMME. 

Elizabeth Ferrers, Baroness of Wemme\ June 6, 1410. 
My body to be buried in the Church of the Holy Cross*, 
near the Tower of London. To the building of a cloister 
there vi /. I will that all my silver vessels^ excepting what 
I have bequeathed, be disposed of for the health of my 
soul, and the soul of Robert Ferrers, my first husband, and 
the soul of Sir Thomas Molynton, my second husband'. 
To Joan Grauncester, my daughter, a cup of gold, which 
formerly belonged to her brother; to Elizabeth Molynton, 
a cup of gold; to Thomas Molynton; Maud Cavendish; 
Elizabeth Lisle, "filise mes spirituali.^" And I appoint 
Joan Graunceston, my daughter, my executrix. Proved 
l6th June, 1411. 



* Printed at length in " Royal WiUs,** p. «11. 

* Daughter and sole heir of William Boteler, of Wemme ; she 
married, first, Robert Baron Ferrers, of Wemme; and secondly, 
Sir Thomas Molynton, Knight, and died 19 Henry IV. Dugdale, 
vol. i. p. 969. But in his History of Warwickshire, he says that 
this Elizabeth married, setondfy, John de Say, and thirdly y Thomas 
de Molynton. Vide the will of this Sir Thomas Molynton, in a 
preceding page, and some pertinent remarks on the contradictory 
statements in Dugdale, in Banks* Extinct Peerage, under Ferrers 
of Wemme, and Butler of Wemme, vol«ii. pp. 79 and 196. 

* Crouched Friars in Dugdale*s Abstract. 

' Omitted in the MS. abstract of this will. 

* Query, god-daughter ? 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 181 



JOANE LADY HUNGERPORD. 

Joane Lady Hangerford S February 1, 1411. My body 
to be buried Id the Chapel of St. Anne, in the Parish 
Church of Farleigh Hungerford, next to the grave of my 
husband. I will that, with all possible speed after my 
decease, my executors cause three thousand masses to be 
^aid for my soul, and for the souls of all the faithful de- 
ceased. Also I desire on my burial day that twelve torches 
and two tapers born about my body, and that twelve poor 
women, holding the said torches, be cloathed in russet, 
with linen hoods, and having stockings and shoes suitable. 
I will that ten pounds be bestowed to buy black cloth for 
the cloathing of my sons and daughters, as likewise for the 
sons and daughters of all my domestic servants. 1 will 
that the two hundred marks now in the hands of my son. 
Sir Walter Hungerford, be given to found a perpetual 
chantry of one chaplain, to celebrate divine service in the 
Chapel of St. Anne, in the North part of the said Church 
of Farleigh, for the health of my soul, and the soul of my 
husband, and for the souls of all our ancestors for ever ; to 
Katherine, the wife of my said son Walter, my black 
mantle furred with minever, and to Thomas his son a 
green bed, embroidered with one greyhound *. 



WILLIAM LORD ROOS. 

William Lord Roos', February 29^ 1412, My body to 
be buried in the Cathedral Church of Canterbury, near the 
Chapel ordained for the Chantry of Thomas Arundel, 

—I I ■■— *— — 1— ii>^— — — I ■ > ■■ — — ■— ^1— ,,. am ■■■■■■ 111— a.iii^— , 

■ Daughter and coheir of Sir Edmund Hussie, Knt and widow 
of Sir Thomas Hungerford, Knt.; she died March Ist, 1413. 
Dugdale, * Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 204. 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 18 Richard II. to 1 
Henry V. and died September Ist, 1414. 



182 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Archbishop of Canterbary, if I depart this life in London, 
or thereabouts. But if I die within the Diocese of Lin- 
coln, then I desire that my body be buried in the Priory of 
Belvoir; and if I die in the Diocese of York, then I will 
that I be buried in the Priory of Rievault. For die find* 
ing of ten honest chaplains, to pray for my soul, and the 
souls of my father, mother, brethren, "and sisters, and also 
for the souls of all my friends and good doers, but spe* 
cially for the soul of my brother Thomas, for eight years, 
within my Chapel of Belvoir Castle, four hundred pounds, 
to the end that one of them shall every day celebrate a 
mass with note, and for that time to be considered as Dean 
amongst them, and all the other nine subject and obedient 
to him. To the Lady Beatrice, my mother, a gilt cup with 
a nob on it *, 



MAUD COUNTESS OF OXFORD. 

Maud Countess of Oxford \ at Bentley, January 20, 
1412 •. My body to be buried in the Nuns* Church at 
Bruseyard. I will that my hearse be covered with black 
cloth> with a white cloth in the form of a cross thereon ; 
also that three tapers be burnt about my corpse on the 
day of my burial, two at my head, and the other at my 
feet, likewise four torches. To the Nuns of Bruseyard my 
manor of Wrabnase, in pure almes, for the health of my 
soul, and the souls of my parents, and the souls of all the 
faithful deceased t« * 

■ ■■■■■■ » ■ ■ ■ ■ I 

* Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 552. 

' She was the daughter of Ralph D'Ufford, widow of Tho- 
mas Earl of Oxford, and mother of Robert Earl of Oxford, the ce- 
lebrated Duke of Ireland ; she died on Wednesday the Feast of the 
Conversion of St. Paul, January 26th, 1413, s. p. 

^ 1412-13. t From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i.p. 196. 



TESTAM£NTA V£TUSTA. 183 



SIR WILLIAM MARNEY, KNIGHT. 

William Marney, Knights August \9, \^14. My body 
to be buried iu the parish Church of Leyr Maroey. And I 
appoint Thomas Mamey, my son, my executor. Proved 
£2d August, 1414. 

In another Will he mentions, ''Anna, my daughter; 
John, my son.'' ' 

ELIZABETH COUNTESS OF SALISBURY. 

Elizabeth Montacute, Countess of Salisbury*, at Don- 
gate, on the. Eve of St. Catherine*, 1414. My body to be 
buried in the Conventual Church of Bustlesham Monta- 
cute. And I desire that on the day of my death dirige 
may be sung at vespers, and mass of requiem on the mor- 
row, at the same place, and that every priest performing 
that service receive xii pence. Also I will, that at every 
place where my body may rest in its carriage to But- 
tesham, my exequies be performed with dirige in the even- 
ing, and on the morrow, before its removal, with mass of 
requiem ; and that in the journey to Bustlesham the sum of 
XX /• or thereabouts, be expended in almes, masses, or 
other'charges ; and when my corpse arrives at Bustlesham, 
I will that XXIV poor men, cloathed in gowns and hoods 
of russet, shall carry each of them a torch of wax at the 
dirige and mass of requiem at my burial, and receive xx J. 
in money. I will that my hearse be covered with black 
cloth, and that five great tapers of wax be placed on it, 
each weighing twenty pounds. On the day of my burial, 
I desire that xxv marks be distributed amongst one thou- 

' Whom it appears was Sheriff of Essex and Hertford 3 Henry 
IV. and died 2 Henry V. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 301 . 

* Daughter and coheir of Sir John de Mohun, of Dunster, Knt 
and widow of William Earl of Salisbury, whose will is inserted in p. 
145 ; she died on the morrow after the Feast of St. Hillary Janu- 
ary 14th next ensuing. > November 24th. 



184 TE«TAM£NT;% vetvbta. 

sand poor people, viz. to cacb of them iv pence; and xii 
pounds X sbiliiiigs to sing three thonsasid inaases with all 
speed after my death, for the health of my soul, and all 
Christian souk. To two honest priests, to sing masses, 
and to say a trental of Gregory for one whole year, for my 
Boul, and all Christian souls^ xiiZ.; to fourscore poor men 
and women bedridden, xxvi/. xiii s. ivd. viz. to each of 
•theiA VIS. viiii2. ; to the Prior and Convent of Bustlesham, 
to maintain one canon priest, and one secular priest, per* 
petually at my altar and tomb, to be made on the South 
side of the Quire of that Churchy opposite to the tomb of 
my lord and husband, to pray for my soul, and for the 
souls of such others as were named upon agreement made 
betwixt them cccc marks ; to make and furnish an altar 
and new tomb for myself and my son, in the South side of 
the same Quire at Bustlesham, opposite to that of my hus« 
band, .c marks '^. 

JOAN LADY SCALES. 
Joan Lady Scales ', wife of Edmond le Thorp, Knight, 

* From Dugda]e*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 649. 

* It would appear from Banks' Dormant and Extinct Peerage, 
vol.ii. p. 479, that she was the widow of Roger Lord Scales, who 
died 9 Richard IL and whose will is inserted in p. 120, mother of 
Robert Lord Scales, whose will will be found in p. 151, and daugh- 
ter and heir of Sir John* North woode, Knt Dugdale merely calls 
her Joan, states the manors of which she had livery, and adds chat 
she died on Friday before the Feast of the Epiphany J Henry V. 
i. e. 4th January 1415, which agrees with the date both of the will 
and the probate. Her second marriage is not noticed by either of 
these writers, and the pedigree of Northwode, in Harl. MSS. 106% 
f. 109, contradicts her having been an heiress or coheiress. A pe- 
digree by Glover, in Harl. MSS. 807> f. 66, states that Sir John de 
Northwood, Knt. had a daughter, who married, first, Roger Lord 
Scales, by whom she had issue ; and secondly, .... lliorp. The 
w|Il of this Sir John Northwood, in p. 109, proves that he had a 
daughter called Joan, who was unmarried in February 1378. It is 
singular that neither of the manors which she mentions in her will 
is included in the list of tliem given by Dugdale. 



TBSTAMBNTA VETU8TA. 185 



^n ike Feast of St Micfaad \ 1414. My body to be buried 
ID the cemetery of the Parish Cburob of Ashwellthorpe ; 
and I bequeath xx/. for the building of my tomb. I will 
that my debts and legacies be paid out of the rents and 
profits of the manor of Stonham, if my said Lprd will per- 
mit ; if not, I will that the manor of Cowling be sold, and 
Uiat the said Edmond Thmrpe have dc mai!ks, if so much 
remain after fcdfiHiiig my wiU^ but if the said legacies, Sic. 
he paid out of the manor of Stonkam, then 1 will that my 
said husband have the manor of Cowling to him and his 
h^irs for ever. Also I wiU that my said husband have th^ 
manors of Stonhamand WyklyfFord for life, with remainder 
of the said manor of Stonham. to Robert Scales, and tbe 
heirs of his body; remainder to Lady Katheriue Savage for 
life^ remainder to our* daughter Isabella, and to the heirs 
of her body ; but if she die without issue, then I desire that 
tbe said manor of Stonham be sold for pious uses, and for 
the health of tbe soul of Lord Scales, my late husband. Also 
I will that the said manors of Stonham and Wyklyfford be 
held by my feoffees for one year after my husband Thorpe'il 
deatb, for the payment of his debts. Also 1 bequeath the 
inanor of Wyklytfol-d, after that time, to my daughtei-^ 
Lady Joan, if living, for three years ; with remainder to 
our daughter Isabella, if alive, for three years ; remainder 
to my daughter, Katheriue Savage ', for two years ; re- 
mainder to Robert Scales, and the heirs male of bis bodjr 
lawfully begotten ; remainder to our daughter Joan, and 
the heirs male of her body lawfully begotten; remainder 
to our daughter Isabella, and the heirs male of her body 
lawfully begotten. In witness, 8u:. I have, with the con- 
sent of the said Edmond Thorpe, my husband, affixed my 
seal. And I, Edmond Thorpe, Knight, having full know- 

' December 129th. 

* The expression ** our daughters '* appears to allude to her 
daughters by Sir Edmund Thorpe, her second husband, and that 
•f ** my daughter** in oUier parts of this will to her daughter by* 
Lord Scales. 

' Banks, in his Dormant and Extinct Peerage, states in a note 
to bb account of the Scales family, that Katherine, the daughter 
of Lady Scales, married Sir Arnold Savage. 



186 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

ledge of the contents, have, in token of such conaent^ 
affixed my seal. Proved 2lst April, 1415. 



THOMAS EARL OF ARUNDEL. 

. Thomas Earl of Arandel', October 10th, 1415. My 
body to be buried in the Quire of the Collegiate Church « 
of the Holy Trinity at Arundel, under a tomb there, to be 
new made for me. I will that a fair monument be erected 
by my executors over the body of my father. For the 
charges of my funeral, and to celebrate masses for my 
soul, cxxxZ. VI «• vnid. In regard to a vow made by me 
to St. John of Bridlington, when I was there with my Lord 
the King, then Prince, viz. that I would once every year in 
person offer to that Saint, or send the sum of v marks 
during my life, I will that my executors forthwith pay all 
the arrears thereof, besiae the cost of the messenger sent 
for that purpose. Also I will that my executors cause a 
Chapel to be built at the gate called Mary-gate, in Arun- 
del, in honour of the Blessed Virgin. I desire that all 
those soldiers who were with me at Harfleur, in France, 
have all their arrears ; and that all those lands and tene- 
ments in the possession of Robert Pobellowe and Thomas 
Harling, priests, by . virtue of my father's feoffment, be 
amortized for the benefit of the hospital at Arundel *• 



EDWARD DUKE OF YORK. 
Edward Duke of York *, of all sinners the most wicked. 



■sw- 



^ Knight of tlie Garter. He was restored in blood in 1 Henry 
IV. the attainder against his father being then reversed, and was 
made a Knight of the Bath at the coronation of that monarch ; on 
the 24th of November 1404, he married Beatrix, an illegitimate 
daughter of the King of Portugal; died s. p. ISth October 1415, 
leaving his three sisters his heirs. Beatrix, his widow, re-married 
John Holland, Earl of Huntingdon. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 320. 

* Edward Plantagenet, K. G. /son and heir of Edmund of Lang- 
ley, Duke of York, was created Earl of Rutland 13 Richard U. 



TBSTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 187 

f 

being, 8cc. the 22d August, 1415, the 3d of Henry V. My 
body to be buried in the parochial Church within my Col- 
lege of Fotheringay, in* the middle of the quire, near the 
steps, under a flat marble. I will that my debts be paid 
before any expence be incurred for oiy funeral, and thai- wlien 
they are discharged, that die expeBOies thereof do not exceed 
G L To my Lord the King the best sword and best '^ dager ^ '^ 
which I have; to my dear wife, Philippa*, my bed. of 
feathers and leopards,, with the furniture appertaining to 
the same; also my white and red tapestry of garters, fet- 
terlocks,, and falcons', my green bed, embroidered with a 
"com pas V' ony two large vessels of silver, the covered 
basons which she now has, with the fetterlocks and falcons 
in the middle, on a blue ground. I will that my menial 
servants who dwelt in my household for a whole year be- 
fore I went to Harfleur, in company with my sovereign 
Lord the King, be paid by my executors their wages for 
the term next after my decease, that is- to say, to each 
Esquire l«., to a "Vadlet*" xx*., to a ''Gar5eon*" . . .*., 
and to a Page vis. viud, I will that all my hopolandes', 
huykes* not furred, be divided among the servants of my 
chamber and wardrobe, at the discretion of my executors. 
Also that my saddles and harnesses be equally divided 
amongst my henchmen 9, excepting that 1 desire that Ro- 
kell may have the best. Also I will, that in all masses and 
other prayers which may be said for me, mention be made 
of my Lord King Richard, my Lord King Henry the 

Duke of Albemarle 29th September 21 Richard IL and was de- 
prived of his title of Duke 1 Henry IV. He was killed at the 
battle of Agincourt, and did not leave any issue. Vide note ' p. 18. 
' Sic in the original. Query, dagger ? 

* Daughter and coheir of John Lord Mohun ; she re-married Ro- 
bert Lord Fitzwalter. Vide her wilt in a subsequent page. 

> Fetterlocks and falcons were badges of the House of York. 

* Sic in the original, probably a circle. 

* Sic in the original. * Ibid. 

7 A note to Royal Wills, says, that hopulandes were long cloaks* 
' Supposed to be a huke or Dutch mantle. Ibid. 
' A foot page. 



188 TSSTAHBNTA VETUSTA« 

Fourtliy my lord and fother Edmund Dake of York, m^ 
lady my mother, Isabel, his wife, and of alt other persons 
departed this life for whom I am in conscience bound to 
pray that God will have mercy on them, and on me, the 
least Woithy of all. Item, I will that all my vestments, cruci- 
fixesy images, tabernacles, basons, ewers, censers, sconces, 
and ot&et jewels in my Chapel, excepting the goods and 
jeweb which I pledged to enable me to go in that voyage 
Co France in the company of my Lord the King, after my 
decease be given to the Master and his Companions of my 
said College, to be perpetually kept by them and their sue* 
cessors, to the honor of God, and of his glorious mother, 
afSt.Thomas the glorious Martyr, St. Edward the Confessor, 
and ail Saints. To Thomas Pleistede xx /. in memory of the 
kindness which he showed me when I was a prisoner at Pe- 

vensey *; to Philip Beauchamp,the habergeon which he wears, 

« I I ■ ■ - -o 

, ■ << Item, je devise a Thomas Pleistede xx i. en memoire pour 
lanaturesse qu'il me monstra quant je fus a Pevensey en garde/' 
The foUowing extract explanatpry of this expression is taken from a 
note to a very able article by the Rev. John Webb, on the deposi- 
tion of Richard II. in Archaeologia, vol. xx. p. 26. Speaking of this 
Edward Duke of York, that intelligent antiquary observes, '^ his 
restless spirit prompted him in 1405 to attempt the rescue of the Earl 
of March from confinement in Windsor ; the plot, however failed, and 
he was arrested and shut up in Pevensey Castle till the next parlia- 
ment/' Hume describes the tergiversation and infamous duplicity 
of this prince with' peculiar force and elegance: "This infamous man, 
who was soon after Duke of York by the death of his father, and 
first prince of the blood, had been instrumental in the murder of 
his uncle the Duke of Gloucester, had then deserted Richard, by 
whom he was trusted ; had conspired against the life of Henry, to 
whom he had sworn allegiance ; had betrayed his associates, whom 
he had seduced into this enterprize [to restore Richard the Se- 
cond to the throne] ; and now displayed in the face of the world 
these badges of his multiplied dishonour/' Vol. iii'. p. 64. 

The gratitude which the bequest that has occasioned this note 
evinces, may be considered as one redeeming trait in a character 
where all besides was dark and contemptible, and corroborates the 
observation that there is no individual so vile but occasionally 
to perform some act worthy of applause and imitation. 



TE8TAMENTA VETU8TA. 189 

and which the Earl of Huntingdoby whom God pardon; 
gave me, also the sword which he has of mine, and /.in 
money; to Thomas Beauchamp my '^ brigaodiers V' ^o-. 
vered with red velvet chequered black and white, and xL 
in money ; to John Popham my new ^' brigaudiers ** of red 
velvet which Grove made me, my helmet which I wear, 
and my best horse excepting the above ; to Diprant my 
small coat of mail, the piece of plate which my Lord the 
Prince gave me, called breast-plate, the ^'pance*'' which 
belonged to my lord my father, whom God. pardon, my 
'^housellV' ai^d my iron morion ^ And I appoint my 
dear servants of approved fidelity towards me, Robert 
Wyntryngham, Clerk, Peter Manan Esquire, John Mus-^ 
ton. Vicar of Caresbrok, and John Loudon, Chaplain, my 
executors; and I will and ordain that Thomas Bishop of 
Durham S Roger Flore, John Russel, and Laurence, be 
super visors« Proved before Henry Chicbeley, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, on the last day of November, 1415 *• 



MICHAEL EARL OF SUFFOLK. 

■ > 
Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk'', ist July, 1415. 

My body to be buried in the Church of the Carthusians 

at Kingston-upon-HuIl, betwixt the tomb of my father and 

mother and the altar, if I die in those Northern parts, and I 

desire that no tomb be placed over me, only a flat 9tone ; but 

if I depart out of this life in any other part of England, then 

' A fashion of ancient armour, cansistLog of many pointed and 
scale like plates, pliant unto and e^sy for the body."^ Congreve. 
Note to Royal Wills, p. 9^1. 

* « Query, belly-piece, fbom pance gros ventre. Pan6e/a great- 
bellied doublet ?** Cotgreve. Ibid. ^ 

s «< Housings." Ibid. 

« « Et mon chaperoR de fere.*' Qrig. 

^ Thomas Langley. 

* Printed at length in *' Royal Wills,'* p. 217. 

* He died at the siege of Harfleur on Wednesday next after the 
Feast o^he Holy Cross, September iatb« 1415, 



t 



190 TESTAMENT A VETUSTA. 

I will that my body be buried in the Collegiate Chul'ch of 
Wyngefeldy on the North side the altar of the Blessed Vir* 
gin. To Katherine, my wife, a little book with tablets of 
silver and gilt, and also the coronet which belonged to the 
Earl of Stafford, her father; to my son, a little primer; 
which belonged to John de la Pole, ** his brother \" And 
I constitute the said Katherine, my wife, and Edmund, my 
uncle, my executors *. 

THOMAS LORD BERKLEY. 

Thomas Lord Berkley^, Sunday the Purification of the 
Blessed Virgid >, 1415. To the fabrick of that Church 
wherein my body may happen to be buried, a gilt cross^ 
with all the relicks included therein ; to my daughter, the 
Countess of Warwick, my best pair of matins; also one 
gilt cup, with XX pounds contained therein; to James, my 
nephew «, my best bed, and great cup of jet ; also twenty 
coats of mail, twenty breast^plates, twenty helmets, and 
twenty lances f- 

SIR THOMAS WEST, KNT. 
Thomas West, Knight % at Stonebridge, beyond the 

' The expression ^< his brother/* may, from the maimer in which 
it is used in Dugdale*8 abstract of this will, either mean that John 
de la Pole was the brother of the testator or of the testator's son. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 186. 

* This Thomas Lord Berkley died s. p. nu on Tuesday the 13th 
July 1417; Elizabeth, his daughter and sole heir, married Richard 
Earl of Warwick, K. G. ' 1415-16. 

^ ** His next heir male being son of James his brother, and who, 
contrary to the usual descent of a barony in fee;, succeeded to that 
dignity, probably from its being then the opinion that the dignity 
depended on the possession of the castle, to which he succeeded 
under an entail.'* Dugdale. 

t From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 361. 

^ Eldest son of Sir Thomas West, Knt. by Joan, sister and heir 
of Thomas Lord de la Warr ; he died s. p. September 30th, 1415. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 191 

Seas, on tbc Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula', 1415. I will 
that DO more than xl/. be laid out in meat, drink, and ta- 
pers on the day of my burial ; and that xxiv /. be given to 
two priests to celebrate divine service for my soul for two 
years after my decease, as also for the souls of all my pro- 
genitors, and all the faithful deceased *. 



WILLIAM LORD BOTREAUX. 

William Lord Botreaux% July 20, 1415. My body to 
be buried in the Parish •Church of Cadbury. To Eliza- 
beth, my wife', all the utensils, ornaments, and furniture 
of my hall, chambers, kitchen, pantry, and buttery, ex- 
cepting the drinking-cups, basons, and ewers, and other 
vessels of gold and silver. To my two daughters ^ m /• in 
money, to be equally shared between them for their mar- 
riage portions, in case I should have an heir male at the 
time of their marriages ; but if they should happen to be 
my heirs, I will that the said m/. be distributed by my 
executors to the poor and needy, and to buy books and 
vestments for such Parish Churches of my patronage as 
may want them, and for the succour of my poor tenants 
in my lordships. I will that three priests celebrate divine 
service for my soul, and the souls of my ancestors, in the 
said Church of Cadbury, until a certain College be there 

* August Ist. 

* From the abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. v. p. 380. 

* He was summoned to Parliament from the lith to the 38th 
of Henry VI. and died 9 Edward IV. 1462, aged at least 76, if 
Dugdale is correct in saying that his father died 15th Richard II. 
Vide a note to p. 177. It appears that he made his will when 
about to accompany Henry V. in his expedition into France, above 
40 years before his death. 

' Daughter of John Lord Beaumont ; it is c^vident that she died 
before her husband, for in a deed dated the 37th Henry VI. he 
calls Margaret his wife. Dugdale, p. 630. 

* One of these daughters must have died young, as Margaret, 
the wife of Sir Robert Hungerford, Knt. was found to be his sole 
heir, by the inquisition taken on his decease. 



\9i TESTAMVKTA VSTUSTA. 

fennded according to my directions by a writing indented^ 
and that each of them shall have z marks yearly. To the 
Friars Augus^tines at Bristol xhs.; to the Carmelites tfaev^ 
XL<. ; to the Grey Friars there xl s. ; to the Friars Preachers 
there xl; to tb^ Carmelites at Marleburgh xls.; to the 
Friars at Salisbury x&s.; to the Friars at Pulcestre xl«.; 
to the Friars at Bridgewater xh$. to pray for the soals 
aforesaid ; to the Prioress and Nuns at Myncbenburgh xx 
marks; to the Carthusians at Henton xls.; to the Friars 
at Bodmin xl5.; and to every house of Friars Mendicants 
iPi Exeter xh$. to pray for my squI; to priests and poor 
people at the solemnizing of my obit c /• I will that od 
every Wednesday and Friday for ten years after my death 
us. be distributed to twenty-four poor people, to be equally 
divided between them. To the before-mentioned Eli* 
zabeth, my wife, a bason and ewer of silver, five goblets 
n^wly made, a drinking-cup of gold made in the. form of a 
rose; as also a suit of vestments for the altar, adorned 
with peacock's feathers and velvet*. 



RICHARD EARL OF OXFORD. 

Richard de Vere, Earl of Oxford ', August 6, 1415. My 
body to be buried in the Conventual Church of the Priory 
of Colne, in Essex, where my ancestors are interred. To 
Alice \ my wife, all my goods and chattels, to pay my debts 



* From Dugdale's Abstract, VoL i. pp. 630f 631. 

* He died on the morrow after St. Valentine's day, 16th February 
1417, and was succeeded in the earldom by John his son and heir. 

* This Alice was the daughter and heir of Sir Richard Seijeaux, 
Knight, though it appears he had formerly married into the blood 
royal, for in the 1st of Henry IV. the Gommons petitioned the King 
to restore him to the office of Chamberlain of England, on the. 
ground « q' ad espose la file de v're soere n're tretf redoute SeignV ;" 
but it is not stated by Sandford, or any other writer, who this Alice 
was; it is most likely that she was the daughter of Elizabeth 
Plantagenet, sister of Henry IV. by her first husband John Duke 
of Exeter, and that she was married or betrothed to the Earl of 
Oxford, but died young, and without issue. 



TEST AMENTA VETUSTA. 193 

aod my funeral ex pences, and to dispose of the remainder 
to pious purposes*. 



SIR ALEXANDER GOLDINGHAM, KNT. 

Alexander Goldingham^ of Chigwell, Knight, 1408. I 
bequeath my lands in Chigwell and Eltesby, in the county 
of Cambridge, and Great Gransden, in the county of 
Huntingdon, to Isabella, my wife, for life, with remainder 
to Sir Walter Goldingham, Knight, my son, remainder to 
John Goldingham, my son. Proved 1409* 



SIR WILLIAM LANGFORD, KNT. 

William Langford, Knight, 24th August 141 1. My wife 
Lecrice and my son Robert. 



JOAN LADY SAVAGE. 

Joan, widow of Sir Arnold Savage, Knight, 1412. lap- 
point my son Arnold my executor f* 



ISABEL COUNTESS OF SUFFOLK. 

Isabel d'Uffprd, Countess of Suffolk *, September 26, 1416. 
My body to be buried in the Abbey of Campesse, near 
my- husband ; and on the eve and day of my burial I will 
that five square tapers, four morters, and eighteen torches. 



* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 196. 

t For the notes of this and of the two preceding Wills the editor is 
indebted to George Baker, Esq. the historian of Northamptonshire. 

* Daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, K. G. Earl of Warwick, 
and widow of John le Strange, of Blackmere ; she married secondly, 
William D'Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and died s. p. on the Feast of St. 
Michael the Archangel 29th Sept. 1416. 



194 TESTAMBNTA VETU8TA. 

borne by eighteen poor men clothed in white, but without 
any banners, be about my hearse. For my funeral ex- 
penses on the eve and day, and to distribute to poor peo- 
ple, cl. I desire my executors to provide thirteen secular 
priests to sing for tny soul for the term of three years ; also 
for the soub of my dear Lord and husband, of my father 
and mother, and of all others for whom I stand obliged to 
pray *. 

THOMAS DUKE OF CLARENCE. 

Thomas, son of the King, Duke of Clarence, Earl of 
Albemarle, and Steward of England', 10th July, I417. 
My body to be buried in Christ Church Canterbury, at the 
feet of my Lord and father. I will that my executors pur- 
chase the patronage of some Church worth xl /. per an- 
num, to be appropriated to the Priors and Monks of that 
Church, for the maintenance of four secular priests, to 
pray for the souls of my father and mother, my own soul, 
and the souls of my dear wife Margaret*, and of all the 
faithful deceased, to be paid for out of the money owed 
me by my Lord the King, and the Dukes of Berry, Or- 
leans, Bourbon, and Alengon. The residue of my goods 
to Margaret, my dear consort, to be disposed of for the 
good of my soul. And I appoint the said Margaret, my 
wife, Dna John Pelham, Dnm Henry Merston, Clerk^ 
Dnm John Oolvyle, Knight, and William Alyngton, Esq. 
executors of this my will. 

Also I will that, immediately after my death, the rents 
and profits of my castles, manors, services, lands, 8cc. in 

* Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 49. 

' He was the second son of Henry IV. was created Earl of 
Albemarle and Duke of Clarence 1419, and was killed on Easter 
Eve March 22, 1421, at Bange ; he died s. p. 1. 

* She was sister and coheir of Edmund Holland, Earl of Kent, 
and widow of John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset ; by her first hus- 
band she had Henry Earl of Somerset, whom the Duke of Cla- 
rence in his Will calls his son ; she died 30th December 18 Henry 
VI. anno 1439. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 19^ 

HoldernesBey in the county of York, and elsewhere, as well 
in the Kingdom of £ngland as elsewhere, be received by 
Margaret, my. dear wife, and my other feoffees and execu- 
tors, for the payment of my debts. And if the sums now 
due to ipe by my Sovereign Lord the King, and the Pukes 
of Berry, Orleans, Bourbon, and Alengon, be paid after 
my decease, I will that the money which I have ordered to 
be levied by my dear wife out of my said castlea, manors, 
services, 8cc. be repaid to her. I will that the profits aris- 
ing from the wardship of the lands and tenements of my 
most dear son, Henry Earl of Somerset % ^nd of Thomas, 
son and heir of Mons^* Morice Russel, Knight, together 
with their marpage^, be disposed of in aid of the payment 
of my debts. And if the said Earl ^enry, and the said 
Thomas Russel, die within age, I will, 8cc. . Provided 
always, that the profits of the wardship of the lands of ouv 
said son, for the two years next before he becomes of full 
age, be appropriated to the use of my said son, the Earl, 
for the better maintenance of his estate. After the pay- 
ment of my debts, I bequeath my said castles, manors, 8cc. 
to my said wife Margaret for her life, with Temainder, if I 
die without issue of my body, to my said son, Henry Earl 
of Somerset, and the heirs of his body ; failing such, with 
remainder to our Sovereign Lord Henry the Fifth, King 
of England, and tP his heirs. Kings of England, for ever. 
Proved at Lambeth, before Henry Chicheley, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, November 23, 1423*. 



ROGER DE SWYLLINGTON. 

Roger de Swyllington, on the morrow qf St. Katberjne 
the Virgin*. To Joane, my wife; to John Swyllington, 
my son; to Margaret and Grace, my daughters; to Oni 

* His son-in-law, who was aged 30 years at the death of his mo- 
ther ; hence he was about eight or nine when his father-in-law 
made his will. 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 230. 
3 November 26th. 

o 2 



196 T£STAMB)9TA VETUSTA, 

Robert Willoughby, Lord of Eresby ; to Lord Fitz-Hugh ; 
to John de Heveringbam ; to Joan, wife of John my son ; 
to the Friars Preachers near Ludgate, London xl /. to Iceep 
the anniversaries of myself, of Robert de Swyllington, my 
father, of the aforesaid Joan, and of Joan my wife ; to the 
two sisters of Thomas de Swyllington, nuns. And I 
appoint Thomas Hopton^ and Joan his wife, my executors. 
Proved 12th August, 1417. 



SIR RICHARD ARUNDEL, KNT. 

Richard Arundel. Knight', July 8th, 1417. My body to 
be buried in the Chapel of our Lady in the Abbey of Ro- 
chester. I will that my executors find one man who, for 
the good of my soul, shall go to the Court of Rome, to the 
Holy Land, to the Sepulture of our Lord '' et ad sangui- 
nem sanctum *" in Germany as soon as they well can pro- 
vide him after my decease. I will that my goods be 
equally divided between my daughters Philippa, Johanna, 
Eleanor. 



SIR THOMAS MARNEY, KNT. 

Thomas Mamey, Knight', May 6, 1417. My body to 
be buried in the Church of Leyr Marney, near my father. 
John, my brother. Proved 7th November, 1421. 



' It is probable that this Sir Richard Arundel was related to the 
Earls of that name, but his will does not afford sufficient informa- 
tion to connect him with that family. 

* Sic in the MS. whence the above abstract is taken. 

) Mentioned by Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 301, as having died without 
male issue, and that his daughter and heir Margaret, dying in her 
minority, John her uncle became her next heir. 



TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 197 

SIR JOHN HARINGTON, KNT. 

John Harington, Knight % Lord of Aldingfaam, 8tb 
January, 1417% proposing to visit foreign parts: My body 
to be boried wheresoever I shall happen to die ; to Eliza- 
hetb, my wife, all my goods in my houses in the counties 
of Somerset, Devon, and Cornwall; also one half of all my 
silver vessels; my manor of Rogeburgh, in Devonshire. 
And I appoint the said Elizabeth, my wife, my executor. 
Proved 26th April, 1418. 



MARGARET LADY SWYLLINGTON. 

Margaret Swyllington, Saturday 19th Febraary 5th 
Henry V. 1418. My body to be buried in the Church 
of the Priory of Kirkby Bellers. Dni John de Eynesford, 
late my husband ; to John de Swyllington; to Robert, bro- 
ther of the said John ; to Margaret, sister of the said John. 
Proved July 2d, 1418. 

EDITH A LADY BRUYN. 

Editha, wife of Dni Maurice Bruyn, Knt. Lady of Stoke 
Dabemon, April 25th, 1418. My body to be buried in the 
quire of the Church of our Lady of Stoke Dabemon. And 
I appoint Sir Maurice Bruyn, my husband, my executor. 



EDWARD EARL OF DEVON. 

Edward Courtenay, Earl of Devon', Tiverton, June 29, 
1419. My body to be buried in the Abbey Church of 
Forde *. 

' He was in the expedition in France in 3 Henry V. 1415, and 
in the next year received two hundred pounds for his wages. 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 99. ^ 1417-18. 

' He was Earl Marshal of England S Richard II. and died 5th 
Dec. 1419. * From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 640. 



198 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

ELIZABETH LADY KERRIEL. 

Lady Elizabeth Kerriel, May 10, 1419, 7th Henry V. 
My body to bei buried near the tomb; of Maud Trussel my 
mother. To Thomas, tny sod. Abd I constitute John, Mas- 
ted of the College of Cobfaam, in Kent, my executor. 
Proved 26th May, 1419^ 



SIR WILLIAM ARGENTON, KNT. 

William Argenton, of Halesworth, Knight. I appoint 
Sir Joseph Carbonnel and Sir John Heveningham, Knights, 
my executors. Proved 1419*. 



RICHARD GRENVILLE, ESQ. 

. Richard Grenville, of Wotton, Esq.' at London, July 
4tfa, 1419| purposing to go beyond the seas. My body to 
be buried in ecclesiastical sepulture ; and I will that all my 
debts be paid, after which I bequeath &11 miy lands and te- 
nements in Wotton to Christian my wife, and the heirs of 
my body by her, in default whereof to my right heirs for 

* Ex. inform. George Baker, Esquire. 

* Ancestor of his grace the Duke of Buckingham. He died be- 
fore June Ist, 1428 ; his wife Christian was the daughter of . . » . 
Lancelove, whom he married 3 Henry IV. 1401-9. The following 
abstract of her will, from Collins* Peerage, vol. v. p. 239, is inserted 
here because, as Uiere is no date to it, there is difficulty in placing 
it in the text. As she was living August 5th, 32 Henry VI. 1452, it 
was probably written about that period, when, if she was married 
in 1401, she mOst have been nearly 70 years of age. 

Christian, widow and relict of Richard Grenville, Esq. 
My body to be buried in the Chapel of St. Mary within 
the Prebendary Church of St. Margaret at Leicester ; to 
Agnes my daughter ; the test and residue of my goods I 
bequeath to my son , John Grenville, whom I appoint my 
executor, and I expect him to dd for my soul what may be 
most pleasing to God and for my soul's good, as he will an- 
swer the neglect thereof before Summe Judice. 



TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 199 

ever ; to Eustace, my son, all my lands in Hadenbam, in 
the county of Buckingham, in fee simple, and I will that 
Christian my wife release whatever right she may have in 
my said lands at Hadenham to her son Eustace, before she 
enjoys my lands in Wotton ; to Christian my said wife all 
my goods and chattels, and I desire that she will do for my 
soul what she would do for her own soul in the like case. 
And I appoint William Burwell and Robert Stratford my 
executors, to each of whom I bequeath c $. sterling for their 
trouble ♦. 



ROBERT KNYVET, ESQ. 

Robert Knyvet, Esquire, January 1st, 1419 ^ My body 
to be buried in the chancel of the Church of our Lady of 
Ramsden bell house, in the county of Essex. My sons 
Thomas Knyvet, John Knyvet, and Henry Knyvet; my 
daughter Joane ; my wife Eilena* Pr9ved 18th January 
1419'. 



IDONEA UGHTRETH, late SANDFORD. 
Idunea Ughtreth, late Sandford*, 7 Henry V. 1419. My 

* From the abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. i. pp. 236, 239. 
» Query, 1419-20? 

* She was the daughter and heiress of Sir Thomas L*Engleys, 
Lord of Little Ashy, the descendant of an ancient family, and 
married, first, Edmund de Sandford, to whom she brought 
the manor of Little Asby, a moiety of the manor of Helton, 
and a considerable extent of land at Askham, in Westmore- 
land. Her second husband was Sir Thomas Ughtred, whom she 
also survived. In 2 Henry Y. she made a Will, in which she 
constituted Robert Brette, esq. who married Joan, her daughter, 
and her son John Sandford^ brother of Sir William Sandford, her 
executors; the latter of whom was to charge his son's sons to pro- 
vide a fit priest to celebrate divine service in the Church of 
Ascome for ever, for the souls of their benefactors, and of all the 
faithful, on pain of her blessing or malediction : it was dated at 
Cramsle, in Northampton, which was probably the residence of 
her second husband. 



200 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

body to be buried in St. Petei^s, Leicester; to that Church 
my best Testmcnt ; to Idonea Saodford ' my best black bed 
with the appurtenances ; to the mother of Robert Brette all 
my gowns and kirtles ; to Joan *, my daughter, one vessel 
of silver without a cover; to Idonea aforesaid all my 
jewels; to Robert Sandford', my heir, eight oxgangs of 
land, and the mill in Ascome which my father bought of 
i5ir Hugh de Lowiher, upon condition that he find a chap- 
lain tu celebrate for the souls of my father and my ances- 
tors in the Chapel of St. Mary of Ascome * ; and I will that 
if he find a priest for the said purpose, that a distribution 
of xsm be made for the souls of my father and ancestors; but 
if he does not find the priest, then I will that the said ox- 
gangs be sold, and the money applied to provide the said 
priest *. 

« 

EDMUND HAMPDEN, ESQ. 

Edmund Hampden, Esquire s, Saturday^ next after the 
feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, 1419. My body to be 
buried in the Chancel of the Church of Great Hampden; 
and I will that a white stone be placed over me and Joane 
my wife, with this writing : 

2'e eat tfv0 atty Bm l^ &< ^write, 

JFor (!flunutt1i'0 eoul anH 3(ane'0, a patantuBtec anii an abe« 

To Isabella Bruyn xiii«. iind,; for my funeral charges 
XX 8. And I appoint John Barton, jun. Nicholas Bagen- 
hale, Thomas Durem, Gents. Thomas Joye, Rector of 

' Her daughter, who appears to have died unmarried. 

* She married Robert Brette, esq. who was appointed her exe- 
cutor in her previous Will just alluded to. 

' Her second son, but who became her heir on the death of Sir 
William Sandford, circa 5 Henry V. He married Elizabeth 
Thornburgh, and died 38th Henry VI. 

* Askham, in Westmoreland. 

* Nicolson's and Burn's Westmoreland and Cumberland, vol. i. 
p. 424. 

^ Of the family, if not the immediate ancestor of John Hampden, 
the celebrated patriot, tempore Charles I. ^ December 2d. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 201 

PenyntoD, John Starlyngi Rector of Hampden aforesaid, 
and Robert Seman, Rector of Dodyngton, my executors. 
Proved 29th April, 1480. 



ROSE LADY CAVENDISH. 

Rose Cavendyshe*, wife of Sir Andrew Cavendyshe, 
Knight, Jane 13, 1419. My body to be buried in New 
Abbey, near the Tower of London, by my late husband. 
Sir Andrew. And I constitute William Cavendish, Robert 
Cavendish, and William Bartilmew, Clerk, my true and 
faithful executors, to whom I bequeath all my goods, &c. 
to be distributed according to their discretion for the good 
of my soul, thesouls of my ancestors, and all my benefactors'^. 



SIR JOHN DEVEREUX, KNIGHT. 

John Devereux, Knight, July 15, 1419* My body to 
be buried in the Church of St. Michael of Winterbourne, 
in Kent. Proved October 21, 1489- 



RICHARD LORD SCROPE OF BOLTON. 

Richard Scrope, Knight, Lord of Bolftn % at Roan, Ja- 
nuary 24, 1420. My body to be buried in the Abbey of 
St. Agatha, in Richmondshire. To that house x/. in gold. 
I will that five priests, five clerks, and three poor men, be 



* Widow of Sir Andrew Cavendish, Knight of the Shire for Suf- 
folk 51 Edward III. and brother of Sir John Cavendish, Chief Jus- 
tice of the King's Bench 1372, whose Will is inserted in p. 1 10. 

* From the abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. i. p. 280. 

^ He was retained to serve the King in the Duchy of Guienne 
with 16 men at arms and 45 archers 3 Henry V. and in the 7th 
Henry V. attended the King in the expedition then made into 
France, shortly after which he died. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 656. 



202 TESTAMENT A VJSTU8TA. 

provided, and that each priest have xii marksi each clerk 
▼I markBy and each poor man ii marks, until sach time as 
my executors obtain licence from the King and from the 
Pope to found a college for the priests and clerks and the 
poor men above mentioned, in such place as my executors 
shall think best; and after such licence be had, I desire 
my executors to endow the same, so that every priest may 
haye perpetually x L every clerk iii /., and three servants 
each of them xhs, and that my executors at their cost 
build and furnish the said College. Also I will that the 
Church in that College be dedicated to the honour of the 
Annunciation of Our Lady ; and that my executors distri- 
.bute c /. in money to poor people, where they may think 
inost needful, for the health of my soul. To the fabrick 
of York Minster x/.; to the four Orders of Friars in York 
and Richmond, to pray for my soul, so much as my exe- 
cutors shall think fit. Also I will that if my Lord the King 
be good to my executors in favour of this my will, that he 
be forgiven half the gold which he oweth me for my wages 
upon pawns ; to my kinsman Mr. Marmaduke Lumley a 
cup of silver, called the Constable Bolle ', upon condition 
that when the College be finished it be made into a chalice 
for that house. I will that my manor of Pysche, in the 
South Country, and my manor of Langley, in the Bishoprick 
of Durham, be sold for the payment of my debts and lega- 
cies. And I appoint the said Marmaduke Lumley, my 
cousin, executor, and my Lord of Clarence, to whom I 
bequeath xlL supervisor of this^my will**^. Proved 8th 

November, 1420. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

SIR JOHN INGOLDESTHORP. 
Joha Ingoldesthorp, Knight, Thursday* next after the 

* Query, bowl ? 

* Partly taken from Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 656, and partly 
from a MS. note. It is to be remarked that I>iigdale calls the 
Marmaduke Lumley thereia mentioned a cierk. 

* November 2d. 



TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA. SOS 

Feast of All Saints, 1419. My body to be baried in the 
Parish Church of Burgh, in the ^county of Cambridge. To 
the Chaui^y there xx l. My manors of Kenwicke, Bel- 
laessesy Ihgtesham, Ingoldesthbrp, Frenge Reynhatb, in 
Kiorfolk ; Somerton, in Suffolk ; and Burgh, Swaf ham, 
and Bulbeck, ib Cambridgeshire. And I appoint my wife, 
Elizabeth, Sir John ColviUe, Knight, Sir William Assoii- 
hull, and William AUington, Es^iuire, my executors. 
Proyed 8th June, 1420. 



' I • 



ROGER SALVAIN, ESQ. 

Roger Salvain, Esq. £6tfa October 1420. My sons John 
and Gerard, and my daughter Alice ; my brothers John and 
Gerard*. 



SIR ROBERT SWlNBURN, KNT. 

Robert Swinbum, Knt. My sons William Swinbum, 
Esq. Sir Thomas Swinbum, Knt. and Andrew Swinburn; 
my grandsons William and John Swinburn, sons of Wil- 
liam my son ; Philippa, wife of my said grandson William 
Swinburn ; John Swinburn, son of my said grandson Wil- 
liam Swinburn and Philippa his wife. Proved 12th June 
1421 1- 



ELIZABETH LADY INGOLDESTHORP. 

Elizabeth, widow of Dni John Ingoldesthorp, at Swaf- 
ham Bulbec, Thursday * next before the Feast of St. Ed- 
mand, King and Martyr, 1421 ^ My body to be buried 

* Ex inform. George Baker, Esq. f Ibid. 
' November 13th. 

* A note of this will in another MS. differs somewhat fVom the 
above, as it states that it was dated Thursday next after the Feast 
of St. Edmund, November 27th, and contains some names which 
are not mentioned in the other MS. but omits others which are. As 
it is presumed that tlie names given in both notes are in the ori- 
ginal, they are introduced into the abstract in the text. 



204< TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

iQ the Parish Charch of Burgh^ in the county of Cam- 
bridge. To my son Thomas a red and white bed; to my 
daughter Eleanor a black mantle ; to Margaret Ingoldes- 
thorp ; to Elizabeth Colville ; to my sister. Lady Magaret 
Zouche, a chain of gold ; to Dame Joane Assonhull, my 
sister; to Margaret Chamberlain; Elizabeth Suoring. And 
I appoint Sir Walter de la Pole, Knight, Sir John Colville, 
Knight, Sir William AssonhuU, Knight, Thomas Ingoldes- 
thorp, and Henry NofHngbam, Esquires, and John Crane, 
my executors. Proved 12th February, 1422. 



THOMAS INGOLDESTHORP, ESQUIRE. 

Thomas Ingoldesthorp, Esquire*, January 14, 1421*. To 
Margaret, my wife, my manor of Bellasis, and my goods in 
the town of Burgh, in the county of Cambridge. And I 
appoint Robert Clifton, Knight, and Thomas Sorel, Esquire, 
my executors, to whose disposition I leave all my goods, 
and my manor of Kenwicke. Proved May 22, 1422. 



GERARD SALVAIN, ESQ. 

% 

Gerard Salvain, Esq. 1422. My mother Dame Alice 
Salvain ; my brother John *. 



JOHN AYLESBURY, ESQ. 

John Aylesbury, son of Sir Thomas Aylesbury, Knight, 
1422. My body to be buried at Milton Keynes. Marga- 
ret my wife *. 



' The testator appears to have been the son of Sir John Ingoldes- 
thorp and Elizabeth his wife, whose Wills precede this. 
M 42 1-2. * Ex inform. G. Baker, Esq. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 205 



HENRY PARIS, ESQ. 

Henry Paris, of the county of Cambridge \ Esq. I be- 
queath my manor of Wrotting to my wife Margaret for 
life, with remainder to my son Henry and my daughter 
Katherine ; my uncle Nicholas *. 



MAUD COUNTESS OF SALISBURY. 

Maud de Montacute, Countess of Salisbury % at Schenle, 
June 22, 1423. My body to be buried in the Priory of 
Bustlesham Montacute, in the county of Berks. To my 
daughter Anne ; to my son, Alan BoxhuU. And I appoint 
Anne, my daughter, my executrix. 



LUCY COUNTESS OF KENT. 

Lucy Countess of Kent', 2d Henry VL 1423. My 
body to be buried wheresoever it shall please God. To 
the Abbey of Brunne, where my lord and husband is 
buried, m crowns ; to the Prior and Convent of the Holy 
Trinity without Algate, London, m crowns, upon condition 
that they provide a fitting priest to celebrate divine service 
daily to the end of the- world, in each of the religious- 
houses of St. Mary's Overes, in Southwark; the Carthu- 

* Circa 1422. * Ex inform. George Baker, Esq. 

^ She was the daughter of Sir Adam Francis, of London, Knt. 
(an Adam Fraunceys was Mayor of London in 1352 and 1353,) 
and was widow of Sir Alan Boxhul], by whom, it appears from her 
will, she had a son Alan ; she married secondly, John Aubrey. Her 
third husband was John Montacute, third Earl of Salisbury, who 
was beheaded 1st Henry IV. 

' Widow of Edmund Holland, Earl of Kent, K. G whom she 
married 8th Henry IV. and the daughter of the Duke of Milan. 
She died 4th April, 2d Henry VI. 1424, s. p. and was interred in 
the Church of the Augustine Friars, near Broad-street, London. 



206 TBSTAMBNTA VBTUSTA* 

sians, Minoresses, and Holy Trinity without Algate ; and 
in the Abby of Brunne^ as also in the four houses of Friars 
Mendicants in'London, for the health of the souls of King 
Henry IV, and King Henry V. late Kings of England^ for 
the souls of Edmund late Earl of Kent, my husband, for 
my own soul and the souls of all the faithful deceased. I 
will that in every of these houses they shall yearly cele-* 
brate the anniversaries of the said Edmund and me; like- 
wise that every brother and sister in each of these houses 
shall every day say the psalm of De prqfnndisymth the 
wonted orison for the dead, for the souls of the said Ed- 
mund, and for my soul, by name, and that every Convent 
in each of these houses shall once every month, in their 
quire say Placebo and Dirige by note, and on the morrow 
Mass of Requiem by note, for our souls, and once in every 
year a trental of St. Gregory for our said souls by name • 
to the Provost and Canons of our Lady de la Scale of Mi- 
lan M crowns ; to the Church of St. John at Conquet, 
where my father lyeth buried m crowns ; and I desire that 
two honest and fitting priests shall celebrate divine service 
for ever for the health of my soul and the soul of my said 
husband, one of them in the Church where my body 
shall be buried, and the other in the Church of the Mi- 
noresses without Algate** 



HENRY LORD FITZ-HUGH. 

Henry Lord Fitz-Hugh \ on the Feast of St. John the 
Evangelist*, 1424. My body to be buried in our Lady 
Kirk, within the Abbey of Jorevaulx, and I desire that it 
be carried there with all possible haste after my death, and 
buried by day-light if it does not arrive too late, but if it 
does, then 1 will that it be interred the saqie night ; also I 
will that one thousand masses be said for my soul with all 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 78. 

^ Knight of the Garter. He was summoned to Parliament 
from Ist Henry IV. to 2d Henry VL and died January 11, 1495. 

* June 24. 



TESTAMENT A VETUSTA. 207 

speed. And I appoint Sir William, Sir Geoffery % and Mr. 
Robert Fitz-Hugh, my sons, and Elizabeth % my wife, my 
executors'*^. 



EDMUND BRUDENELL, ESQ. 

Edmund Brudenell, Esquire', June 21, 1425. My body 
to be buried in the Church of Agmondesham. To Ed- 
mund, son of my brother William, my armour, x marks, 
all my books, and my manor of Ranes, with remainder to 
my next male heir ; to John, my natural brother, my cloak ; 
to Alice, my wife, a piece of plate, with the cover, having 
thereon her arms. And I appoint Alice, my wife, Henry, 
my brother, and Edmund, son of my brother William, 
deceased, my executors f* 



THOMAS DUKE OF EXETER. 

Thomas Duke of Exeter S at my manor of Greenwich, 
Sunday 2gth December, 1426, 5th Henry VL My body to 



' Daughter and sole heir of Sir Robert Grey. Vide her Will 
in a subsequent page. 

* This Robert was consecrated Bishop of London in 1431. 

* Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 404. 

s Of the family from which the Right Honourable the Earl of 
Cardigan is descended. He was Clerk of the Parliament temp. 
Edward III. and Attorney General from 1386 to September 30, 
1399) and in the reign of Richard II. was Coroner of England : 
his only issue was a daughter, Alice, a nun at Burstall. Collins. 

t From the Abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. ii. p. 49^. 

« Thomas Beaufort, Knight of the Garter, third son of John of 
Gaunt, byKatherine Swynford, was appointed Admiral of England, 
Aquitaine, and Ireland, 10th Henry IV. Chancellor of England 
11th Henry IV. Earl of Dorset 13th Henry IV. and created Duke of 
Exeter (for life only) 4th Henry V. He married Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Sir Thomas Nevill, of Hornby, Knight, whose Will be founcf 
in a subsequent page, by whom he had no issue, and died at 
Greenwich, December 29, 1426. 



208 TESTAMEMTA VETU8TA. 

be baried with Margaret, my wife, in the Chapel of the 
Blessed Virgin annexed to the Church of St. Edmund's 
Bury, in the Diocese of Norwich. And I will that, imme- 
diately after my death, on the following day if possible, or 
the second or third at the farthest, one thousand masses be 
said for my soul, as also for the souls of my father and 
mother, and for the souls of all my benefactors, and of all 
the faithful deceased; of which masses 1 desire that two 
hundred be of the Holy Ghost, two hundred of the Blessed 
Virgin, two hundred of All Saints, one hundred of the 
Angels, and one hundred of *' Requiem JEtemamy^ and 
for every mass 1 will that the priest celebrating it have ivJ. 
I desire that no sumptuous gr extraordinary expense be 
made at my funeral, but that only five tapers, standing on 
five candlesticks, be placed about my body ; and that the 
same number of torches be put about it at placebo and 
dirige, and morrow mass. 1 will that there be as many 
poor men as I may have lived years at my funeral, each 
carrying a torch, and habited in a gown and hood of white 
cloth, and receiving as many pence as I may have lived 
years; and that there be the same number of poor women, 
V)f good character, cloalhed in a gown and hood of white 
cloth, and each receiving a penny; all of them, both men 
and women, praying for my soul, and the soul of Marga- 
ret, my wife, and the souls of all my ancestors. Also 1 
will that on each of my anniversaries, and the anniversaries 
of Margaret, my wife, the Abbot of the aforesaid Monas- 
tery, if present, receive vis. viiid. the Prior, if present, 
III 5. IV J. and each Monk of the said Monastery then pre- 
sent XX £f. and I bequeath to the Monastery, to support 
such anniversaries, cccc marks. To Dno John Loudon, a 
monk in the Church of St. Peter at Westminster, xl5.; to 
the Nuns below Bishopsgate, London, xx s, ; to the Lady 
Johanna, a nun in the Church of St. Clement's beyond 
Temple Bar, xxs. ; to the Lady Alice, a nud at St. Albany, 
XX s.; to each of the Hospitals of St. Mary, St. Bartholo^ 
mew, Elsyng, St. Thomas, and St. Giles, near London, 
rX\d.\ to the prisoners in the five prisons of Ludgate, 
Newgate, Fleet, King's Bench, and Marshalsea, c Zi. to be 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 209 

distributed in the liberation of the said prisoners, according 
to the discretion of my executors and supervisors; to the 
Church of Windsor, to the honour of God omnipotent, 
the blessed Mary, ever virgin, his Mother, St. Gregory 
Martyr, and all his Saints, my best cross of silver, with my 
arms upon the same; to the most Christian Prinice^, tny 
Lord the King; to my sister Joan', Countess of West- 
moreland, a book called Tristram » ; to my brother, Tho- 
mas Swynford^ a cup of silver; to my * esquires and ser- 
vants, Thomas Swynford l marks; Matildi Fulshurst x 
marks; George Wightor xx marks; John Walpoole xl 
marks; William Frenyngham x marks; Nicholas Porpoint 
x/t.; Richard Togood x/t.; Thomas Swanton c^.; John 
Smyth V marks; John Kirton x/s\; William Frere x 
marks; Robert Bedelyngton x/t.; Peter Walpole C5.; John 
North wode xx/t.; John Bermyngham x/i. ; William Bol* 
tonxL/t. ; Thomas Sandoh xx marks; Thomas Boswyle 
x/t. ; John Aubrey cs.; John Felix cs.; John Neve xts.; 
Thomas Parys c«. ; John Lucas xx marks ; William Burgh 
XX marks; Richard de Chaundrey cs.; John Doucheman 
x/t.; John Maxey c«. ; William Hert v marks; Alan 
Holme C5.; John Gregory xls.\ Simon Croxehorn C5.; 
John Sumpterman x marks; Robert Norman xl5.; Roger 
Brice xhs.; Henry Haunson x/t.; Christopher Pulford cs.; 
Richard Ryxton v marks; Henry Porter xl 5.; William 
de Coquina xls.; William Brone x/t.; Ignasio Clifton 
x/t«; Ralph Wadeswyk xx marks; Edmund Thawerxli.; 
to Nicholas Cheriton x/t.; William Harewode xls.; Wal- 
ter Serjaunt x marks; Thomas Bourchier x marks ; John 
Pyke V marks ; Richard Foteman v marks ; Richard Ponde- 
manv marks; Richard Barbour xls. : Thomas de Halle 

* This title, though almost exclusively applied to the Kings of 
France, appears to have been bestowed on Henry VI. from his ex- 
emplary piety. 

* Second wife of Ralph Neville^ K.G. first Earl of Westmoreland. 
' A note to Royal Wills, p. 259, says, '< a romance of that name.*' 

* Probably his half-brother, the son of his mother by her first 
husband, Sir Otes Swynford, and who must then have been about 
58 years of age. Vide note *% p. 143. 



910 TBSTAJfeNTA VETU8TA. 

xht, ; ThomM Chamber, aP Lynk, xl j. ; Henry deSpioery 
aP Newark ct.; Thomas Lewya ii marks; John Haw- 
fllepte X marks ; John Payn xl 4. ; Robert Hoode 11 marks ; 
Thomas BuUok xlj.; John Elmer 11 marks; Richard 

Brewer xl«. And I constitute William Philip, 

Knight ; Thomas Walbery, Rector of Hadley ; William 
Morley, my Treasurer; Richard Aghton, Enquire; and 
John Qertrami my executors, to each of whom 1 bequeath 
xhii. sterling. I will that a tomb be made over my grave 
and my wife's in the place aforesaid, for the expenses of 
which I bequeath cfi. sterling. And I appoint Master 
William Alnewyk, Bishop of Norwich ; Master Philip 
Morgan, Bishop of Ely; Lewis Robsert, Knight; and 
Walter Hungerford, Knight, Supervisors of this my will, 
to each of whom I bequeath a cup. I will that the feoffees 
for my use, in the manors of Westhorp atte Marshall in 
Westthorp, Wy verston, Keveles in Wyverston ; Over Re- 
fcynghale, Watlesfelde, Walsham, and Mutford ; and the 
advowson of the Churches of Westthorp; Wyverston, Re- 
kinhall, and Watelesfelde, with all and singular their ap- 
purtenances, in the County of Suffolk ; and in the manor 
of Crokeseston, in the County of Southampton, with the 
advowson of that Church, and in the reversion of all my 
landsy&c. in the city of Norwich, and also in the manor of 
Greenwicbf and in all and singular the lands, tenements, 
&c. late the property, in the "County of Kent, of Richard 
Tyrell and other feoffees, permit my executors, immediately 
after the day of my death, to receive all rents and profits of 
the said manors. Witnessed by Mr. Thomas Morstede, 
Mr, John Somersete, Thomas Hoo, Gilbert Debeuham, 
Mr. Robert Wyot, Mr, William Wode, William Bolton, 
Ignasio Clifton, William Bourg, John Lucas, John Au- 
brey, Christopher Pulford, John Neve, John Smyth, Tho- 
mas Swanton, and Edmund Tyler. 

Also I bequeath to John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, a sil- 
ver vessel of the value of xl/i. ; to Ignasio Clifton, beside 
the xL already bequeathed him, a complete suit of ar- 
mour and two horses ; to Thomas Hoo, Esquire of my 
Chamber, one of my coursers, called Dunne. I will that 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 211 

William Morfey, my Treasurer, have for his life all my 
tenements within the city of Norwich; to Richard Carbo- 
nell, Knight, one of my doublets faced with velvet. I will 
that Gilbert Debenham, my Esquire, be free from all de- 
mands of my executors. To William Philip, Knight, a 
cup. Proved before William Lyndewode, Official of the 
Court of Canterbury, January 28, 1427 *• 



ALICE LADY HOWARD. 

Alice Howard % wife of Sir John Howard, Knight, Octo- 
ber 13, 1426. My body to be buried in the South aisle of 
Stoke Neyland Church, near my father. To my son 
Henry, and the heirs of his body, my lands in Polstead, 
and, failing such heirs, with remainder to William Clop* 
ton. Esquire ^ to Sir John Howard, my husband, the manor 
of Stoke Neyland for his life, with remainder to Robert 
Howard ^ my son, and to the heirs of his body, remainder 
to Henry Howard, brother of the said Robert; to Lady 
Margaret, wife of the said Robert. Proved Oct. 20, 1426. 



ALIANORE LADY ST. AMAND. 

Alianore Lady St. Amand', May \5, 1426. My body 
to be buried in the Quire of the Friars Preachers, in Ox- 



^m 



* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 250. 

. * She was the daughter and heiress of Sir William Tendring, 
of Tendring, near Stoke Neyland, Knight, and died October 18, 
1426. 

* Who married Margaret, daughter, and at length co-heir, of 
Thomas Mowbray, K.G. Duke of Norfolk ; and father of Sir John 
Howard, K.G. first Duke of Norfolk, from whom the numerous 
ennobled branches of tliat illustrious family have sprung. 

' Widow of Almeric Lord St. Amand. From her Will it is evi- 
dent that she had another husband ; but whether Lord St. Amand 
was her first or second husband does not appear. She died on 
Friday in Whitsun-week, May 24, 4th Henry VI. anno 1426\ 

P 2 



212 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

ford, before the high altar, near the grave of my husband. 
To the priests and children of New College, Oxford, xhs. 
to pray for my soul ; to the fabrick of the Church of Osel- 
bury, in the Diocese of Winchester, xxs, to pray for the 
soul of Sir Thomas Wodelock, Knight, my late husband, 
and for the souls of my sons and daughters, there buried '(^^ 



ELIZABETH LADY FITZ-HUGH. 

In the name of God, Amen. In the year of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, 1427, the 24th day of the month of September, 
I, Elizabeth, Lady of Ravensworth, late the wife of the 
Lord Fitzhugh \ whose soul God for his mercy assoyl, be- 
ing in good health, devise and ordain my testament in this 
wise and manner as follows : first, I bequeath my soul to 
God Almighty and to our Lady St. Mary and to St. John 
the Evangelist, and to all the Saints of Heaven, and my 
body, after my death, in all the goodly haste that it may 
be, carried to Jervause % and there to be buried before the 
high altar, beside my Lord's body. And as for my interment, 
1 will that there be at my exequies and at masses upon the 
morrow, twenty-four torches burning about my hearse, 
and fifteen tapers thereon of a pound burning before the 
high altar in the same masses time. And they that come 
thither that time unbidden be fed after that my executors 
think honest and reasonable, as well the poor as other 
men. And if my executors deem this not enough, I 
pray they fulfil it more in paying of my debts and mar- 
rying of my children; also I will that in as goodly haste af- 
ter my death as it may be done, there be sung for me tea 
trentals, and within three months a m masses ; also I will 
that my son William have a ring with a diamond^ and my 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 21. 

' Daughter and sole heir of Sir Robert Grey, Knight, and wi- 
dow of Henry Lord Fitz-Hugh, K. G. whose Will is inserted in p. 
20(). ^ Jorevault. 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 



213 






son Robert* a psalter covered with red velvet, and my 
daughter Margery a primer covered in red, and my daugh- 
ter Malde Eure • a primer covered in blue, and my daughter 
Elizabeth a cbaplet of pearl with double roses, and my 
daughter Lore a tyre with double roses of pearl, and 
Robert Fitz-Hugh, my son, a ring, with a relick of St. Pe- 
ter's finger, and Geg», a pair of beads of gold ; and my ser- 
vants my clothing, as my gowns, and my kirtles; and 
young Elizabeth Fitz-Hugh *, my god-daughter, a book co- 
vered with green, with prayers therein ; Elizabeth Darcy * a 
girdle of black gilt ; and Margery Darcy a narrow girdle 
of gold; and I will that my household servants have parted 
amongst them, after the discretion of my executors, c marks; 
and I will that the stuff of all my houses of office, as 
kitchen, pantry, and buttery, and such other, remain to 
my son Sir William, and the residue, after my debts are 
paid, which I will and charge and pray all my executors 
to see first paid and done before all other things after my 
interment^ I will be put to the marrying of children unmar- 
ried, as well my third part of my Lord's goods as of other, 
so that if the goods will suffice, my son Geoffrey have c /.; 
and other of two daughters cc marks ; and young Eliza- 
beth Fitz-Hugh, my god-daughter c marks ; and to fulfil 
all this my wUl aforesaid I ordain and make my executors 
my son Sir William, my son Sir Geoffrey, and my son Ro- 
bert, Christopher Boynton, and William Katryk, praying 
and charging them ; that they do for my soul, as my trust 
is in them, and as they will answer before God ; and I will 
that Christopher Boynton and William Katryk have each 
a. silver, cup covered, or else v marks. 

■ Robert was Bishop of London. His epitaph is in Weever, p. 
151 of the last, and p. 360 of the old edition. 

• Maud, wife of Sir William Evre, Knight. 

3 Query, who was meant by this appellation ? 
« Probably likewise her grand-daughter, daughter of William 
Lord Fitz-Hugh, her eldest son. 

* Eleanor, the testatrix's daughter, married Philip Lord Darcy; 
and the Elizabeth and Margery Darcy here mentioned were most 
likely her grand-daughters. 



214 TESTAMENTA VKTUSTA. 

In Dei domiae^ Amen. Decimo die Decembn anno 
B'ni 14279 ego Elizabeth Domina Fitz^Hugh de Ravens- 
worthycompos mentis et sanae memoriasi condo testanientutn 
meum in hunc modum. In primis Ieg6 animam meam Deo 
Omnipotent!; B. Marie matri sues, et omnibas Sanctis, ac 
TX)rpus meum sepeliend. in Abbati& Jorovall; et volo quod 
voluntas mea, sicut ordinatum in testamento meo primo 
facto, sit iideliter implenda. Insuper volo, et est voluntas 
mea, quod debita mea solventur, et ilHs plenari^ solutis 
lego Elizabeth Fitz-Hugh et Lore Fitz-Hugh filiabus 
meis, residuum omnium bonorum meorum. Datum apud 
Wytton die et anno suprascriptis*. 



THOMAS LORD ST. JOHN. 

Thomas Poynings, Lord St. John*, at my manor of 
Halfnaked, on the eve* of St. Thomas the Apostle, 1428. 
My body to be buried within the quire of the Priory of 
Boxgrave, in Suss^, on the north part of the tomb of Lady 
Philippa, sometime Countess of Arundel, my wife'. I will 
that a marble stone be laid over my grave, and that twelve 
torches of the value of vi s. viii d. be burnt at the mass, on 
the day of my burial, and after mass ended at my burial ; 
also that five tapers, weighing forty pounds, of wax, burn 
about my body at the said funeral, and twelve poor people 
bearing the before-mentioned torches ; and I will that each 
of them have a gown of black cloth and xii d. in money ; 
to Isabel, my daughter, one dozen of silver vessels gar- 
nished. And I constitute Maud, my wife, and Sir John de 
Bohun, Kntk my executors *. 

* Printed from the Antiquarian Repertory, No. XXIX. 

■ He died on the 7th of March following the date of his will. 

* March 6th. 

' Daughter of Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, and widow 
of Richard, sixth Earl of Arundel. 

* From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. ii.^. 134. 



TBSTABfENTA VBTUSTA* 215 



THOMAS EARL OF SAUSBURY- 

Thomas MontaGtite^ Earl of Salisbory, Percb, and Lord 
MoDthermer '. I will that in whatever part of the world I 
may chance to die that my body be buried at Bustlesham^ 
in Englatid^ and that neither my wife ^ nor my executors 
make any great entertainment^ or hare a solemn hearse for 
me at my funeral, or that any large or snmptuous lights for 
worldly pomp be then provided; but when my body is 
carried through any city or town in my native country, I 
desire that four torches only be lighted at its entrance 
therein and borne therewith. Also I will that upon the 
day of my trental twenty^fonr torches be provided, and 
four other lights to be about my corpse at the solemnizing 
the exequies and masses there to be celebrated for my soul, 
and to be borne by twenty-four poor men all cloatbed alike* 
To every poor person coming to my trental iiii pence for 
the health of my soul, fifty poor people being first chosen 
out of the whole number there present, to each of whom I 
desire my most beloved wife to give xxd. with her own 
hand ; to the Monastery at Bustlesham c /. sterling out of 
my moveable goods, that the Prior and whole Convent 
there shall specially ordain one mass to be celebrated every 
day for^my soul, in a particular place appointed for that 
purpose, with this collect, ^' Deus cut proprium, 8cc. ;" and 1 
~— --^'— - 

' Knight of the Garter, and a distinguished soldier under 
Henry V. He died of a wound received in his face at the siege 
of Orleans/ November 3, 7th Henry VI. 1428. There is no date as- 
signed to the abstract of this will in Dugdale> vol. i. p. 659, 
whence the above is taken, but it was probably written a few years 
before his death. 

* His second wife, Alice, daughter of ^Thomas Chaucer, Esq. 
son and heir of Geoffrey Chaucer the Poet, and widow of Sir John 
Philipps, Knight ; about two years after the death of the Bail of 
Salisbury she married William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, K. G. 
By his first wife Eleanor, sister and co-heir of Edmund Holland, 
Earl of Kent, K.G. he left* one sole daughter and heir, Alice, whc 
married Richard Nevil, Earl of Salisbury, K.G. 



y 



216 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

desire that two canons of that house, immediately after the 
mass of the blessed Virgin be ended before my tomb, shall 
for ever say the psalm of De Profundis, with the Lord's 
Prayer, the Angelical Salutation, and this prayer, '' Deus, 
cui proprium est miserere semper et parcere, gropitia ant- 
ma famuli tui Thoma^ et omnia eftis peccata dimitta, ut, 
mortis vinculis absolutus transire mereatur ad vitamJ* 
With these prayers also : '' Inclina" and " Fidelium Deus, 
pro animabus parentum et progenitorum nostrorum inibi 
sepultorum/^ 8cc. Also I will that my most beloved wife, 
so soon as possible after my death, cause one thousand 
masses to be specially celebrated for my soul, and the souls 
of all the faithful deceased ; and I charge her and my exe- 
cutors that they cause three masses to be daily celebrated 
for my soul during the term of her life in such places as 
they may think fit within the realm of England, and if 
possible in her presence ; likewise I desire that three poor 
people be every day brought, by the care of my executors, 
to my wife, that is to say, severally, if they can be found, 
to the end that she may serve each of them with one mess 
of meat, one loaf, and one quart of drink, and that she and 
my executors, within one year after my decease cause m 
marks to be distributed amongst poor people, partly in 
money, and partly in raiment, both linen and woollen ; also 
I will that my said wife and my executors shall, with all 
good speed, cause three thousand masses to be celebrated 
for the souls of all the Companions of the Order of St. 
George of the Garter, in recompense of those masses which 
have been by me forgotten ; to my uncle Sir Richard de 
Montacute, Knight, c /. sterling; to John, my bastard son, 
L marks. 

IN A CODICIL. 

I desire that d marks be raised out of my lands to 
erect a cbauntry to the honour of the Blessed Virgin, 
above the high altar in the east part of the Conventual 
Church at Bustlesham, forty feet in length, twenty feet 
in breadth, and the height of the walls twenty feet; and 
also that a tomb four feet in height be raised in the midst 
thereof, containing three distinct places, the middlemost 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 217 

higher than the other two hy half a foot, in which I will 
that my own body be laid ; and the body of the Lady AH- 
anore^ sometime my wife, on the one side, with the body of 
the Lady Alice my present wife, now living, on the other 
side, if she will, which tomb I desire be made of marble, 
with portraitures of each in brass, and epitaphs ; as also a 
chapel of timber surrounding it, with an altar for masses 
to be daily celebrated thereat, for the health of my soul *. 



SIR RICHARD POYNINGS, KNT. 

Richard Poynings *, eldest son of Robert Lord Poynings, / 
at the town of Sandwich, July 28, 1428. My body to be-i?^<^ ^ 
buried in the burial ground of Poynings, before the north *- 1> ^^ 
door of the Church, if my wife pleaseth, or where else she 
pleases ; to my beloved wife Lady of Arundel and Maltra-, 
vers ; to my cousin William Arundel % son of my said wife, 
a piece of the holy cross, to him and his heirs. And I ap- 
point John Belney and Walter Cury, Esquires, my execu« 
cutors. Proved October 31st, 1430. 



SIR WALTER BEAUCHAMP, KNT. 

Walter Beauchamp, Knight*, December 30th, 1429. 
My body to be buried in the chauntry of Langton^ To 

* Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 652. 

' Of this Sir Richard, Dugdale says that he died vit& patri8> 
leaving, by Alianore, daughter of Sir John Berkley, a daughter 
Eleanor, who was found next heir to her grandfather, Robert 
Lord Poynings, 25th Henry VI. vol. ii. p. 135; and in vol. i. p. 323> 
he states that she was the widow of John Lord Maltravers (8th 
Earl of Arundel), and married, thirdly, Sir Walter Hungerford, 
Knt. Vide her will in a subsequent page, and the genealogical 
table annexed. * His son-in-law, William, 9th Earl of Arundel. 

3 Father of Sir William Beauchamp, Lord St. Araand. Vide 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 252. 

* Query, Lavynton ? vide Dugdale, ibid. 



218 TKSTAMENTA VBTU8TA. 

Elizabeth, mj wife. Aod I «pponit Sfar WShwi Beau^ 
chaiDp \ my fadr, and Bjchwd BeaiichaiBp % my sod^ with 
JoliD Baciie^ my eoasin, my executors. Proved 14th Fe-^ 
bnouny 1429 ** 

PHILIPPA DUCHESS OF YORK. 

Philippa Dachess of York and Lady of the Isle of 
Wight', at the castle of Carisbroke, in the Isle of 
Wight, on St. Gregory's day*, 1430. My body to be bu- 
ried in the Conventual Church of Westminster. I will 
that on my body coming to Westminster thirteen poor 
men be clothed in an hopelond ' and a black hat, each 
two tarrying a torch to dirige and to mass of requiem in 
the mornings and that each of the said men have xx d. of 
money ; also I will that the hearse be covered all round 
with black cloth; Item, I will that a curious hearse of wax 
of a small siae be placed upon the aforesaid hearse; to each 
House and Convent of Friars in London of the four or- 
ders to come to Westminster on the day of my funeral xxs« ; 
to my son Walter Lord Fitz-Walter, to aid in the perform- 
ance of my last will, a cup ; to the Sieur Tistot, to be the 
supervisor of my said will the best of the two large silver 
vessels ; to Sir John Cromwell, Knight, to assist in the ful- 
filment of my will, two vessels of silver spotted with 
lilies on the cover, also c marks ; to John Appilton, Es- 
quire, c marks ; to Alison Saint Paule x marks ; to Rich- 
ard Wene and Ann^yes Wene his wife c marks to buy 

' Evidently his eldest son. 

* Afterwards Bishop of Salisbury. 

* The wife of the testator was Elizabeth, the daughter and co» 
heir of Sir John Roche, Knt. « Query, 1429-30 ? 

^ Second daughter and coheir of John Lord Mohun ; married, 
first, to Edward Duke of York, whose Will is inserted in p. 186 ; 
and secondly, to Sir Walter Fitz-Walter, by whom she had the 
Lord Fitz-Walter mentioned in her will. 

* Query, November 17? but the festival of St. Gregory,Pope, 
occurs on the 12th March? ^ A long cloak. 



TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. glQ 

a corody ' for their lives. And I appoint Sir John 
Ck>rawall, Thomas Chauser^ John Hore, and Sir John 
QoBBwdi^ Chaplain^ my executors; and I bequeath to 
Thomas Chaweser c marks) -and to John Hme and Sk 
John Cqrnwall each xx/. Proved before Henry Chicheky^ 
Archbishop of Canterbury, at his manor of Lamehith 13th 
November 1431 *. 



SIR THOMAS STRICKLAND, KNT. 

Thomas Styrkland% at my shipping in Sandwich, 1430. 
My body to be buried in " some haly kirke or seyntwary ' ;*' 
Mable my wife, to be my '* hale exectrixe '' with the heipe 
and consel of Nyander and John Wilson,, if itlike her ; if 
ought come to me but good my wife to have all my 
'Uands, tentysS rents, and dues, with their appurtenances,'' 
goods moveable and immoveable, during the nonage of 
Wat ', my son, to the quitting of my debts and marrying 
my two daughters, and finding a priest to sing for me and 



* A corody was a sum of money or an allowance of meat, drink- 
ing, and clothing, allowed by an Abbot out of a Monastery to the ' 
King for the maintenance of any one of his servants ; but in the 
sense used in the text it appears to have meant a maintenance for 
life. 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 9^4. 

^ He was son and heir of Sir Walter de Stirckland, of Helsing- 
ton, CO. Westmoreland, Knight. In 7th Henry VI. he repre- 
sented the county of Westmoreland in Parliament, and in 9th 
Henry VI. went to London, and joined in the solemn cavalcade 
which was to attend the young King to Paris for his coronation. 
When going upon this expedition he made his Will, and sent it to 
Mabel, his wife. 

' Church or sanctuary ? * Tenements. 

> Walter Strickland, Esq. a strenuous and active supporter of 
the Lancastrian cause. In 90th Henry VI. he was Knight of the 
^re for Westmoreland ; and in 87th Henry VI. was retained by 
Richard Earl of Salisbury to serve him in peace and war. On 
the overthrow of the partisans of the House of Lancaster, this 
Walter, in 1st Edward IV. had a pardon granted him. 



220 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my ancestors at St. KathenDe's altar in Kirkby Kendal 
three years. My son^ when be comes of age, to have his 
lands, except my wife's jointure and dower; also what the 
deeds thereof mention, except the lands given to my son 
Robert for life, in which Richard Broughton and Thomas 
Broughton, Priests, stand enfeoffed; ''my wife to take 
none husband te ' my two daughters ars maryt or holpyn ;" 
after my debts quitt, and my daughters married, the sur* 
plus of my goods " demise ye me • at your awne will^*/* 



MARGARET LADY SCROPE. 

Lady Margaret Scrope, wife of Sir Roger Le Scrope, 
Knight «, and daughter « of Robert Lord Tiptoft, April 13th, 
1431. My body to be buried in the Church of the Holy 
Trinity, Christ Church, London* And I appoint Thomas 
Scrope, my son, and Guy Fairfax, my executors. Proved 
l4th May, 1431. 



HENRY BRUDENELL, ESQ. 

Henry Brudenell, of Agmondesham, Esq.' Jan. 22d, 143 1 . 
To trustees, my manor of Shardelows, in Agmondesham, the 
reversion of the manor of Stoke Mandevile, called Oldbury, 
and the reversion of the manor of Brydell, in Sanderigg, 
in Hertfordshire. I will that John Brudenell, my son, and 
the heirs of his body, have all those lands in the tenure of 



' Query, until? * Query, may? 

* Nicolson and Bums* Westmoreland and Cumberland, vol.i.p.94. 

' Baron Scrope of Bolton, he died 1403. Vide bis will, p. 160. 

« And coheir. An extensive and laboured pedigree of the Lords 
Scrope of Bolton, in Blore*s History of Rutland, states, that in the 
7th of Henry IV. she re-married John Nixander ; if this really oc- 
curred it is not a little remarkable that she should not mention it 
in her will. Dugdale takes no notice of any such marriage. 

^ Of the family of the Right honourable the Earl of Cardigan. 



TE8TAMENTA VETU&TA. 221 

John Russell, Richard Chowne, and John Prestmere, with 
the wood called Denford Wood, also the manor of Sharde- 
lowes, with remainder to Edmund, brother to him the said 
John ; to Robert, my son, my manor of Oldbury, with re- 
mainder to Edmund, son of William, my brother, and the 
heirs of the body of the said Edmund, remainder to Mar- 
garet, my sister, and the heirs of her body; remainder to 
my right heirs ; I will that my lands lying scattered about 
Chesham, Agmondesham, Wendover, and elsewhere, be 
sold and that the money be distributed for my soul and the 
souls of Edmund my brother, of Alice wife of the said 
Edmund, and for the souls of my father and mother *. 



WALTER LORD FITZ WALTER. 

Walter Lord Fitz- Walter*, April 10th, 9 Henry VL« 
body to be buried in the Priory of Dunmow, and I will 
that my executors make an arch in the wall near to the 
grave of my mother, and that therein my body, and the 
bodies of my wife and children, as likewise the bones of 
my mother, be deposited, for the charges whereof I be^ 
queath xl marks*. Proved 10th November 1432. 



SIR THOMAS SACKVILLE, KNT. 
. Thomas Sakevyle, Knight », of the county of Sussex, De- 



* From the abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. ii. p. 499. 

' He was summoned to Parliament 7th and 9th Henry VI. in 
which year he was in the expedition into France. Elizabeth, his 
daughter and heir, conveyed the Barony of Fitz- Walter to her 
issue by her second husband Sir John Ratcliffe, Knt. 

* Circa. * Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 2^. 

' Knight of the Shire for Buckinghamshire 1 and 18 Richard 
II. and Sfaeiiff of Sussex and Surrey 7 Henry IV. He was an- 
cestor of his grace the Duke of Dorset ; and must have died very 
aged. 



222 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

cember 1, 1432. My body to be buried in the Cboir of 
the Conventual Church of Beygham. To the Abbot and 
Convent lxxx marks, beside xx now in their hands owing 
to me, whereof I will that x marks be distributed to every 
canon of that house and every priest of the same; xx$. to, 
every deacon and subdeacon, and xs. to eviery nun, on 
condition that they be every one enjoined in their celebra- 
tion of obsequies, vigils, orations, and other works of cha^ 
rity and contemplation, to mention me and Margaret my 
wife, my father, and mother, all my ancestors, benefactors, 
and all the faithful deceased ; and I will that the residue of 
the said xxx marks be distributed by my executors to pay 
the debts of the said Abbey and Convent ; to the Church 
of St. Richard of Chichester xx s, ; to the Church 
of St. Christopher of Canterbury xx s. \ to the Friars 
Preachers of Wincbelsea X5.; to the Friars of Lewes vis. 
viiid,; to the Friars Augustin of Rye vis. viiid. ; and to 
the Friars Carmelites of the same place vis. viud.; to 
fifty poor virgins (such as my executors shall elect) ^iiit* 
IV d. each towards their marriages; and to Edward Sack* 
ville, my son, all my goods in my bouse and wardrobe, 
with all my manors and lands, &c. Proved l6tb Decem- 
ber, 1432* ' 

WILLIAM CAVENDISH, ESQ. 

William Cavendish ', Citizen and Mercer, at London, 
January 5th, 1432*. My body to be buried in the Church 
of St. Thomas the Martyr, of Aeon, if I depart this life in 
London; but if I die at Cavendish or elsewhere in Suffolk, 
then I will that my body to be buried in the parish Church 
of the Blessed Virgin St. Mary in Cavendish, and that x l /. 
be given to the Church where I may be buried; to Joan, 
my wife, one moiety of my goods and chattels as dower ; 
to Vl^alter, my brother, an annuity of during his 



^^ From the abstract in Collins' Peerage^ vol. ii. p. 151. 
^ Of the house from which his grace the Duke of Devonshire is 
descended ; he died 11th Henry VL * Query, 1432-3 ? 



TESTAMENTA VSTUSTA. itiS 

life ; to my brother Robert the guardianship of my son 
Thomas Cavendish during his nonage. And I appoint 
the said Robert, William Fleet, and William Berne way, 
my executors *• 



JOHN DUKE OF NORFOLK. 

This is the last Will of John Dake of Norfolk \ Earl 
Marshal and of Nottingham, Marshal of England, made 
at Eppeworth, 19th October, Uth Henry VL 143£. He 
bequeathed his body to be boried in the Carthusian 
Church, in the Island of Axholme; to Katherine", wifeof the 
said Lord, all his plate of gold and silver ; to the said Ka- 
therine the manor of Eppeworth for life, also the castles and 
honours of Brembre in Sussex, and of Gower, in Wales, 
for life; to Thomas Newmarche, for life, the office of 
steward of the manor of Eppworth ; to John Dantre, Es* 
quire, x /. a year for his life, arising from the rents of the 
manor of Fomsetts, in the county of Norfolk, from the end 
of two years; to John Pecke, for /his life, the office of 
keeper of the park of Lopham, in the county of Norfolk ; 
to John Basset, esquire, for life, lyd, per day ; to Thomas 
Hide lucf. per day for his life. And he appointed the 
said Katherine, his wife, bis principal executrix, and all 
the other persons mentioned in this his will, his executiM^, 
except that Edmond Wynter be not, 8ic. In testimony of 
which the aforesaid John, Duke> hath affixed to this his 
last Will, the seal of his arms. Proved at Lambeth, before 



« From the abstract in Collins* Peen^e, vol. i. p. SSI. 

* Joha Mowbray, Knight of the Garter, second son of Thomas 
Duke of Norfolk, whose honours were forfeited in 1413. Thomas, 
his eldest brother, died s. p. and in 1494 he was restored to the 
Dukedom of Norfolk : he died shortly after the date of his will. 

* Daughter of Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, K. G. ; she 
married, secondly, Thomas Strangeways, Esq. ; thirdly, John Vis- 
count Beaumont, K. G.; and lastly, Sir John Widvile, Knt. Dug- 
dale, vol. I p. 130. 



224 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Henry Chicbeley, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1 4th Febru- 
ary 14S2'S*. 



JOANE LADY BERGAVENNY. 

In the name of the Blessed Trinity, Father, Son, and 
Hply Ghost, the*10th day of January 1434', I, Joane Beau- 
champ, Lady of Bergavenny*, as a meek daughter of Holy 
Church, full in the Christian faith and belief, whole in mind 
and body (blessed be God), considering that the frail con* 
dition of this wretched and unstable life is full of perils, 
and the end and conclusion thereof is nought else but 
death, from the which no person of none estate shall es- 
cape ; and therefore purposing, with the leave of God, to 
dispose such goods as of his grace he hath lent me, in 
such use as might be most to his pleasauns and profit of 
my soul, and all theirs that I am bounden to ; I have or- 
dained and make my testament and last will in this form: 
First, I bequeath my soul to the mercy of my blessed Sa- 
viour and Maker Jesus Christ, through the beseeching of 
his blessed Mother Mary, and all holy company in Heaven; 

« 

* Printed at length in Royal Wills, p. 266. Dugdale*8 Abstract, 
vol. i. p. 130, states, that it was dated May SOth, 7 Henry VL 
1429, and that it contains directions for the removal of the bones 
of the testator's father from Venice to Epworth ; but no such be- 
quest appears in the copy given in Royal Wills. The third per- 
son is used throughout, many blanks occur, and it has the appear- 
ance of being an imperfect instrument. 

' Query, 1434-5? 

* She was daughter of Richard, and sister and coheir of Tho- 
mas Earl of Arundel, and married William Beauchamp, Baron 
of Bergavenny, whose Will is inserted in page 171- The above 
long abstract of her Will is taken from Dugdale's Baronage, vol. i- 
p. 240, who says he has inserted it " in regard that by it the 
greatness and state ^wherein the nobility of England in those days 
lived, may in some sort be known" It is given at length in the 
text for the same reason, and because it is particularly worthy of 
attention from the curious bequests and directions contained in it. 



TBSTAMENTA VfeTUSTA. 225 

and my simple and wretched body to be buried in the 
choir of the Friar Preachers of Hereford, in a new tomb by 
my worthy lord and sometime husband, Sir William Beau- 
champ, on whose soul God have mercy. But I will that 
my body be kept unburied in the place where it happeneth 
me to die, unto the time my maygne ^ be clothed in black ; 
my hearse, my chare, and other convenable purveyance 
made, and then to be carried unto the place of my burying 
before rehersed, with all the worship that ought to be done 
unto a woman of mine estate, which God knoweth well, 
proceedeth not of no pomp or vain glory, that I am set in 
for my body, but for a memorial and remembrance pf my 
soul to my kin, friends, servants, and all other; and I will 
that every parish Church that my said body resteth in, a 
night after it passethfrom the place of my dying, be of- 
fered two cloths of goldj and if it rest in any College or 
Conventual Church th^ee cloths of gold ; also I devise, that 
in every Cathedral Church or Conventual, where my body 
rests a night, toward the place where my body shall be bu- 
ried, that the dean, abbot, or prior have, vi«. viii J. and 
every canon, monk, vicar, priest, or clerk, that is at the 
dirige at the mass in .the morning shall have xii d. ; also I 
^ordain that anon after my burying, there be done for my 
soul five thousand masses, in all the haste that they may 
goodly ; and I bequeath unto the house of the said friars 
at Hereford, in genera], ccc marks, for to find two priests, 
perpetually to sing for my lord my busband, my lord my 
father, my lady my mother, and me, and Sir Hugh Bumel, 
Knt. and all my good doers, and all christian souls ; the 
one priest to sing the first mass in the morning in the same 
house, and the other the last mass that is done in the day, 
in the same house, so that it be seen that there be sure or- 
dinance made therefore to be kept perpetually as law will ; 
and I bequeath each friar of the same house, in special the 
day of my burying, to pray for my soul iii 5. iv J. ; and I will 
that the foresaid friars have a whole suit of black, chat is to. 
say,achesepy],twotunicles, three copes, with my best pair of 

■ Household. 
9 



826 TEStAMENTA VETUSTA; 

caDdlesticka of silver wretheoi and my best suit of vesimenit 
of cloth of gold with peacocka, with altar cloths, aod albs, 
and all that longeth thereto, for a memorial perpetual, to 
use them every year at the anniversary of my lord my hus-^ 
band and of me ; and for the costs of my ii^terment, upon 
my death and burying, I ordain and devise m marks ; and I 
devise c marks to be " dalt pene-mele," or more, after the 
discretion of my executors, among poor men and women 
that come to my interment the day of my burying ; and I 
cmiain and devise to have five priests to sing for me twmily 
winters, for my lord my father, my lady my mother, my 
husband, my son Richard Earl of Worcester, Sir Hugh 
Burnell, Knt. and all my good doers, and all Christian 
souls, and that of the most honest persons, and good con- 
versations that may be found ; of which five priests I or^ 
daln and devise two to sing in the parish of Rochford, and 
other three in Kirkeby Belers, in the county of Leicester, 
during the term aforesaid ; moreover I devise cc marks to 
be departed among my poor tenants in England, to such place 
as most need is, after the discretion of mine executors ; also I 
devise c /. to be disposed iq clothing, bedding, horse, oxen, 
and other bestial and necessaries, within half a year after my 
death, and to be given and dealt among bed-rid men and 
other poor people dwelling in the lordships that I have ^ 
and also I devise that Bartholomew Brokesby, and Walter 
Kebyll, be every year at Hereford, the day of my anniver- 
sary, seeing that my obit, with the remnant of the obsequies 
be done in due wise to the profit of my soul, spending 
about the execution thereof at every time x /• after their 
discretion; moreover I devise to the marriage of poor 
maidens dwelling within my lordships c /. ; and to the mak- 
ing and amending of '^ fabul brugges ' " and foul ways c/. ; and 
to the finding and deliverance of poor prisoners that have 
been well conditioned xl /. ; also 1 bequeath to Sir James, 
son and heir to the Earl of Ormond * d 2. to be despent by 
■ ■ - 

* Feeble or decayed bridges. 

* Who married Elizabeth, daughter of the testatrix, and had by 
her James, John, Thomas, Elizabeth, and Anne ; James succeeded 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 227 

my exeontors about the defence of my lands, that I give 
and assign him by the will of oiy lands^ in case they be 
challenged, or impugned wrongfully, within his age; or 
else to have the same money, or else so much thereof as is 
unspent at his full age, to the same intent, and a pair of 
basins gilt and covered, with my arms; and I devise and 
bequeath to the same Sir James a bed of gold of swans, 
with tapetter of green tapestry with branches and flowers 
of divers colours, and two pair sheets of Raynes, a pair of 
fustians^ six pair of other sheets, six pair of blankets, six 
mattrasaes, six pillows, and with cushions and banncoves 
that longen to the bed aforesaid, with all my stuff at Ber-« 
gavenny, **a pane* of monyvere," with all my armour in 
England and Wales ; which goods I will that it shall abide 
in the keeping of Robert Darcy, Bartholomew Brokesby, 
and Walter Kebell, till the said Sir James be twenty years 
of age. And in case that the said Sir James die within the 
said s^ge, without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then 
I will and devise all the foresaid goods to be delivered to 
John of Ormond ^ his brother, to the same wise that the 
said Sir James should have it ; and if John die ere he come 
of the same age, I will that Thomas Ormond, his brother, 
have it to the same wise that John should have it; or if 
Thomas die ere he come at that age, then I will that all 
these .goods be sold, and done for my soul and heirs, and 
all my good doers. And I bequeath to the same John of 
Ormond a bed of cloth of gold, with lebardes, with those 
cushions and tapettes of my best red worsted, that belong 

to the Earldom of Ormond, having previously, viz. 8th July 27 
Henry VI. been created Earl of Wiltshire. He was a Knight of the 
Garter, and was thrice married, but had no issue ; he was beheaded 
shortly after the battle of Towton Field in 1471. 

^ Archdeacon Nares explains a pane to mean an opening or di- * 
vision in parts of a dress. 

* Who succeeded his brother James in the Earldom of Ormond 
in Ireland, but died s. p. in 1478, when that dignity devolved on 
his brother Thomas, who left two daughters and coheirs, of whom 
Margaret married Sir William Boleyn, and was grandmother of 
Anne Boleyn, Queen of England. 

Q 2 



228 T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 

to the same bed, and bancours and formers that belong to the 
same bed : also four pair of sheets, four pair of blankets, three 
pillows, and three mattrasses. And I bequeath unto Tho- 
mas of Ormond, his brother, abed of velvet white and black 
paled, with cushions, tapettes, and formez, that belong to 
the same bed, three pair of sheets, three pair of blankets, 
three pillows, and three mattrasses. And I bequeath unto 
Elizabeth ', his sister, a bed of blue baudekyn % with 
cushions, tapettes of blue worsted, and formes that belong 
to the same bed, four pair of sheets, four pair of blankets, 
four pillows, and four mattrasses. And I bequeath to my 
son ', Sir James of Ormond, three of the best horses in my 
chare, and John, his brother, my next best, and Thomas, 
his brother, my next best after him, and John Gray the 
sixth. And I bequeath to John of Ormond, and Thamas 
his brother, in defence of their livelihood that 1 have be- 
queathed them, either of them 500 marks. Also I bequeath 
to Bartholomew Brokesby my hullyng of black, red, and 
green, with morys letters, with cushions, with* bancours, 
and costers. And I bequeath unto the same Bartholomew 
my bed of silk, black and red, embroidered with woodbined 
flowers of silver, and all the costers and apparel that 
belongeth thereto. And I will that the said Bartholomew 
have twelve pair of sheets of the best cloth that I have, 
save Reynes six pair of blankets, and a pane of menyver, 
iand a bowl of silver called Playce-bowl, and my best ciip 
of gold covered, and my round basin of silver ppunced 
with rborys letters, with the ewer that belongeth to the 
same basin. And I bequeath to the same Bartholomew a 
dozen vessels of silver garnished, and two basins and two 
ewers of silvers, and my best gown furred with marters. 
And I devise to Robert Darcy cccc marks, and my image 
of our Lady that the Earl of March gave me, and a cup 
of gold covered. Also I devise to Walter Kebell c marks, 



* Who married John second Earl of Shrewsbury. 
■ Tlie richest kind of stuff, the web being gold and the woof silk, 
with embroidery. Nares* Glossary. 
' Her grandson. Vide note % p. ^26. 



TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 229 

and three of my best low horses ; and I will that the said 
Walter have my best black bed of silk, with all the apparel 
of a chamber of the best black tapetter that I have^and six 
pair of sheets, and six pair of blankets, three mattresses, 
and my round basin of silver, with bowls and a ewer that 
belongeth thereto, and my little saler * and six spoons of 
silver, that byn in my manor at the Snytterfeld, and my 
best stained hall, with a potell pot and three pieces of 
silver, and a great maser, covered, that was Sir Adam Per- 
siales, and my second gown of marters. And I bequeath 
the remnant of my gowns, furred with marters, to my son. 
Sir James of Ormond, and to his two brethren, after the 
discretion of mine executors. And I bequeath to Isabel 
Muton c marks for her marriage. And I bequeath to Floris 
Lee c marks and two horses to his marriage ; and I be- 
queath to Richard Burley c marks, so both they be ruled 
by me and mine executors, and dwell with me whilst I 
live. And I bequeath to Raynald Muton c marks. And 
I bequeath to Thomas Besford c marks. And I bequeath 
to John Daunseyxx/. And I bequeath to Henry Lecester 
XX /. .And I bequeath to Henry Fillongley c marks. And 
I bequeath to Alyson Darcy c marks. And I bequeath to 
Henry Brokesby c marks, under the condition that he be 
governed by me, and by the worthiest of his kin. And I 
bequeath to John Massy c marks. And I bequeath to 
Philip Cuberley XX /. and to William Loudham c marks^ 
And I bequeath to Elizabeth, daughter of the Earl of Or- 
monde c marks; and to Thomas Blankany 20/.; and to 
John Yerdley x marks; and to John Bultus x/.; and to 
little Lewes x marks; and to John Hull c shillings; and to 
Thomas Burton x/. ; and to Thomas Welby c shillings; 
and tp John Foreman xl shillings; and to John Gardener, 
of Bergavenny iv marks. And also I will that all the rem- 
nant of my servants be rewarded after the discretion of mine 
executors. Also I devise to my Priests and Clerks of my 
Chapel, if they go with my body, and do my obsequies 
daily, till I be buried, on my costes, and to be ruled by my 
— -^ 

■ Salt-cellar. 



2S0 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

executofSi c marks. And I will that my wards, with 
marriages, and aU the livelihood that I have by them, be 
under the governance of Robert Darcy, Bartholomew Bro- 
ktisby, and Walter Kebell; they to fulfil it, and to dispose 
it to the most advantage of my soul, and to perform it, 
and put in execution my will, and my devise aforesaid, f 
ordain end make mine executors Mr. John Bathe, Canon of 
Welts, taking for his labour xl /., and if he take ministrai- 
tion, Robert Darcy, Bartholomew Broknsby, and Walter 
Kebell, Sir William Creke, taking for his labour, if he 
take ministration, xx L and John Bultus. Aod I will that 
Walter Kebell nor John Bultns administer, nor do nothing 
that toucheth my testament in any wise, without the ad- 
vice or commandment of the remnant of my said execu- 
tors. And the residue of my goods I will and ordain them 
to be disposed by mine executors to bear yearly charges of 
my obits, and in alms deeds doing in the mean time, while 
they will last; requiring and praying all those persons, 
executors aforenamed, and, so far as I dare or may, charg- 
ing them, that as my singular trust is in them before odier, 
they refuse not, but to take upon them the administration 
of this testament, with the conditions before rehearsed, and 
put it in execution, as they would J should do for them in 
like case, and as they will answer before the most high and 
mightiful Judge at the dreadful day of doom, where both 
they and I shall appear. In witness, that this is my last 
will, I have set hereto my seal, written the day atid year 
aforesaid. 



JOHN LORD GREYSTOCK. 

John Lord Greystock*, July lOtb, 1434, 14 Henry VL 
My body to be buried in the Collegiate Church of Grey- 
stock, to which I bequeath my best horse as a mortuary, 
and also ail my habiliments of war, vi2. coat armour, pe^ 

* Ae was summoned to Parliament from 7 Henry V. to IS 
Henry VL and died August 8th 14 Henry VL 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 2^1 

.noosj gyron, Stc. To Ralph, my son and heir, all my 
household goods now in my manor house at Hinderskelfe, 
as also in my houses at Morpeth and Greystock, my plate 
and jewels excepted ; to Elizabeth *, my wife, a ring and a 
broach of gold, with a sapphire and a diamond ; I will that 
each of my otiier sons, viz. Thomas, Richard, and William, 
have IV* marks yearly for Uieir maintenance during their 
lives; to every gentleman now serving with me xhs,; to 
every yeoman jlzx.; to every groom xiiis. ivtf.; to the re- 
pair of Newminster Abbey xx /. ; to the Church of Grey- 
stock all my new vestments, with the ornaments apper- 
taining thereto. And J constitute Ralph, my son and heir, 
ay executor*. 



RICHARD EARL OF WARWICK. 

• 

Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick *, at Caversham, 
in Oxfordshire, August 9th, 14S5. My body to be buried 
in the Chapel adjoining the Collegiate Church of our Lady 
at Warwick, when re-edified, but until it is finished I will 
that my corpse be laid in a chest of stone before the altar 
on the right hand of my father's tomb in the said Church. 
To the Collegiate Church of Warwick an image of our 
Lady in pure gold, there to remain for ever, in the name of 
a heriot ; I desire my executors to cause four images of 
gold, each weighing twenty pounds, to be made like unto 
myself, in my coat of arms, holding an anker* betwixt my 

> Daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Ferrers of Wemme. 

* Sic in Dugdale, but it must be a mistake, as i v marks is a sum 
incredibly too small, even in those days, for a nobleman to leave as 
a moftBtenance for his younger sons ; it was probably four hundred 
marks. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 743« 

* Knight of the Garter; he died on theSOth April 1439. 

« Sic in Dugdale, but it is doubtful which is meant ; Anker or 
Anchor is frequently used as an abbreviation for Anchorite, but it 
cannot possibly mean so in the sense used in the text, and it is ra- 
ther an extravagant idea to suppose that the Earl intended to have 



^2 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

hands, and so to be offered and delivered in my name as 
folio wsy one at the shrine of St. Alban, to the honour of 
God, our Lady, and St. Alban; another to the shrine of St. 
Thomas of Canterbury ; the third at Bridlington, in York- 
shire; and the fourth at the shrine of the Church of St. 
Winifred at Shrewsbury; I will that a goodly tomb of 
marble be erected in the Abbey of Kinswood, in Glouces- 
tershire, on the grave of Elizabeth^ my first wife ' ; I will 
that restitution be made for any wrong done by me, and 
that my servants be rewarded ; to Isabel*, now my wife, all 
the silver vessels, bedding, and household stuff* which I had 
with her, and also beside whatsoever else she has had since 
our marriage, two dozen of silver dishes, twelve chargers of 
silver, twelve saucers of silver, a pair of basons covered 
silver and gilt, four other basins of silver, four ewers of 
silver, twelve pieces of silver of one sort, with my arms 
enamelled on the bottom of them ; also the great pay tren 
bought of the Countess of Suffolk, sometime belonging to 
the Earl of Salisbury. To Henry, my son*, the cup of 
gold with the dance of men and women. I will that, in all 
possible haste after my decease, five thousand masses be 
said for my soul. I will that all my debts be truly and 
wholly paid. I will that, in the Chapel where my body be 
buried, three masses be sung every day, so long as the world 
shall endure; one of Our Lady with note, acording to the 
Ordinale Sarum; the second without notes of requiem, 
viz. the Sunday of the Trinity, the Monday of the Angels, 
the Tuesday of St. Thomas of Canterbury, the Wednesday 
of the Holy Ghost, the Thursday of Corpus Christi, the Fri- 
day of the Holy Cross, and the Saturday of the Annuncia- 
tion of Our Lady ; for the performance of which I devise xl 

an anchor placed in the hands of his effigy as an emblem of hia 
hope or faith. 

* She was the daughter and heir of Thomas Lord Berkeley, by 
whom he had three daughters. 

* Daughter of Thomas le Despencer, Earl of Gloucester. Vide 
her will, in p, 239. 

3 By his second wife, afterwards Duke of Warwick. He died 23 
Henry VL 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 238 

pounds of land per annum. Also I will that my executors 
treat witfa the Abbot and Convent of Tewksbury, that in 
their Monastery my obit be yearly kept ; as also one mass 
sung every day for my soul, which to be the first/ if it 
might be, if not, the last. And I appoint the Lord Crom- 
wely the Lord Tiptoft, John Throkmorton, Richard Curson, 
Thomas Hugford, William Berkswell, Priest, and Nicholas 
Rody, my Steward, my executors*- 



MAUD COUNTESS OF ARUNDEL. 

Maud*, wife of John late Earl of Arundel, May 1 1th, 
1436. My body to be buried in the Chapel of St. Anne, 
within the Abbey of Abbotsbury. To Humphrey, my 
son, my reliques; to Amicia*, my daughter, one French 
book. And I appoint Elizabeth Lovell, my mother, and 
Humphrey Stafford, my father % supervisors of this my will. 
Proved 25th October, 1436. 



• From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. pp. 246, 247. 

' Daughter and sole heir of Sir Robert Lovell, by Elizabeth, 
daughter, and eventually sole heir of Sir Guy de Bryan (ob. v. p.) 
son and heir of Guy Lord Bryan ; she married, first, John Fitz- 
Alan, Earl of Arundel, by whom she had Humphrey Earl of Arun- 
del, who died in his minority 16 Henry VI. s. p. The second hus- 
band of this^aud was Sir Richard Stafford, Knight, by whom she 
had Avice, who in almost every pedigree, excepting one recently 
compiled on unquestionable evidence, and obligingly shown to the 
Editor by his intelligent friend Francis Townsend, Esquire, Rouge 
Dragon Pursuivant of Arms, is called the daughter of the said 
Maud, by John Earl of Arundel, her first husband, leaving Hum- 
phrey Stafford, son of John, brother of Sir Richard Stafford^ her 
father's brother^ her next heir. 

* Who married Sir James Butler, E. G. Earl of Wiltshire and 
Ormond ; she died s. p. 

> Her father-in-law being &ther of Sir Richard Stafford, her se- 
cond husband. 



934 TESTAMRNTA VBTUSTA. 



RICHARD CLINTON. 

Richard Cliaton, of the County of Warwick, Esquire % 
Slst Maji 1436. My body to be buried in the Church of 
St. Anne Aldrithgate, London. To my sons, John, Richard, 
and William. And I constitute Alice, my wife, my exe- 
cutrix. Proved June flOth, 1436. 



JOHN STOURTON. 

John Stourtoui of Preston, Senior, son of John Stonrton, 
sometime Lord ^ Slourton, and brother of William, sod 
and heir of the aaid John, November 10, 1438. My body 
ix> be buried in the Church of Staverdale. To Katberine, 
my wife; to Sir John Stourton my good psalter; to Anasta^ 
tia, my sister; Ip Cecilia, my daughter, one silver cup, 
which I had of Nicholas d'Ortes. If Sir John Stourton % 
my nephew, shall contest with my executors about any 
thing which did belong to William, his father, I will, Sec. 
Proved January fi7, 1438-9- 



MAUD LADY MAULEY. 
Maud Lady Mauley*, October 1, 1438*. My body to be 

■ ■ ■ ' !«■ I ,^m »i . I . I I ■ ■ 1 « ■ ■ A. I « .* I ■■ ■ .1 « I.I ■ ■ I I « I ■ I ■ ■ ■ I ■ ■ III 

' Query, if the Richard Clinton, who was second son of Sir Wil- 
liam Clintoti, eldest son of John third Lord Ointon, by Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir William Deincourt ? Vide Collins* Peerage, vol. 
ii. p. $50. 

^ This Sir John was created Lord Stotuton 26 Henry VI. and 
was the ancestor of the present Lord Stourton. Collins* Peerage, 
vol. vi. p. 390, 391. 

> Daughter of Ralph Nevill, K. G. Earl of Westmoreland, and 
widow of Peter Lord Mauley, who died 3 Henry V. 

« Dugdale states, that this will was dated 1438, 6 Henry VI,; but 
it is probably a typographical error, as it should have been 10 
Henry VI. 



TfiStAMfiNTA VETVSTA. ^SfS 

boried in the CSlardli of the Friars Pteaeherft at Scarde- 
biflrgh, on the south isid^ of the altar, where the Gospels 
are usually read. I desire that ls. be bestowed in tapers, 
to be burnt about toy body oin the day of my funetal. 
Also itx marks for a mal'ble Btone, with my portraitui^ 
thereon in copper ot latten ^ilu Towards covering the 
Toof of that Church with lead e marks; to William Datiell, 
my Esquire, a^up of stiver ^It and iv marks; to Richard 
Plumpton, another of my Esquires, x potmds; to Robert 
Crosse, another of tiiy Esquirea, k/.; to John Hothum, 
another of my Esquires^ a piece <>f plate ciiUed ChaKspece, 
with a silver cover; to every of thy Yeomen who has 
aerved with me for the space of seven years xLs. ; for my 
mortulvry, my best horse, with a saddle. Proved 4th Octo- 
bet, 1438* 

CONSTANCE LADY STRANGE. 

Constance Lady L'Estrange% on the 28th March, 1438% 
make my Will, by command of my' Lord and husband, 
Richard L'Estrange, Lord of Knockin and Mohun. My 
body to be buried in holy sepulture, wheresoevet it shall 
please my Lord and husband. For two hundred masses, 
with placebo and dirige, to be celebrated for my soul, c s. ; 
to my cousins, the Lord Talbot and the Lady Joyce Tiptoft. 



WILLIAM LORD BARDOLF. 
William Phelip, Lord Baniolf*, December 1, 1438. My 



i I ■.■ ■■■!■ il .it I 



* Trom Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 736. 

* Dugdale does not state of whom she was the daughter, but 
merely days that she was the firet wife of Richard Lord Strange of 
Knockin. 

* Bugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 665, dates this will March 8th. 
The date in the text and the bequests to her cousins are taken 
from a MS. note of her testament. 

' Knight of the Garter. Having married Joan, one of the 
daughters and coheirs of Thomas Lord Bardolf, this Sir William 



gS6 TESTA MBNTA V ETU STA. 

body to be buried with my ancestors at DenyDgton, before 
the altar, in the Chapel of St Margaret. I will that in the 
carriage of it to that Church twenty torches be borne 
about it at its entrance into every town through which it 
may pass; and that at my month's end twenty-four torches 
and twenty-four tapers, each of them containing four 
pounds of wax, shall bum about my said corpse during 
the time of my exequies and mass; which twenty-four 
torches I will be carried by twenty-four of my own poor 
tenants cloathed in black, and the twenty-four tapers by 
twenty-four poor women, also my tenants, cloathed in 
white, each of them receiving vindf. for their labour. So 
soon as possible after my decease, I desire that one thou- 
sand masses be celebrated for my soul by the several Orders 
of Friars in the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, and for 
each mass I will that th^y receive iiiitf. a piece. To 
Joan, my wife, all my plate of gold or silver or gilt, but 
after her decease 1 will that the one half thereof remain 
unto Elizabeth, my daughter, in case she be then living. 
I bequeath to the Church of Denyngton, after the decease 
of my said wife, Joan, a mass-book called a Graduall, one 
silver censer, and one legend; for the souls of Sir John 
Phelip, Knight, as also for my own soul, and the soul of 
Joan, my wife, and the souls of my friends, benefactors, 
and of all the faithful deceased. 

A CODICIL TO THE SAID WILL. 

Dated 8th July, 1439- I desire that my body be buried 
in the Church-yard of Denyngton. And I bequeath to 
John Viscount Beaumont, and Elizabeth, his wife*, one 
cup of silver gilt, such as my executors shall think fit*. 

Phelip bore that title, but was never summoned to Parliament. 
He was Treasurer of the Household to Henry V. and Chamberlain 
to Henry VI. in the sixteenth year of his reign, and died soon 
after the date of the above codicil. 

' Called his only daughter in Dugdale*s Abstract, but it is 
doubtful if she was so described in his will. 

* Dugdale*8 Abstracts, vol. ii. p. 214. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. •^ 23? 



ANN COUNTESS OF STAFFORD'. 

In Dei nomiDe, Amen. I^ Anne Coantess of Stafford, 
Bockingh', Herford', and Nortbampton, and Ladyof Brek- 
noc, of hool and avised mynde, ordeyn^ and make my tes- 
tament in English tonge, for my most profit, redyng, and 
understandyng in yis wise. First, I bequeihe my soul to 
Almighty God, and my body to be buried in ye churche 
of L'Antbony byside Gloucestre, in ye place wher I have 
befom ordeyned, and do mad my tombe. Also, I bequetfae 
to the same Churche a c marcs of money, or ye value 
thereof, of such of my movable goodys as wole best seem 
to ye discreciouns of myn executours: and also amongst 
all my detts, I wol that al my mesnial servants be paied 
furst of all her fees and wages, or of any other trewe proved 
dettes to hem dewe; and than all othir vitaiilers, mer- 
chants, or artificers, that I owe any good, to be payd first, 
whereas most nede ys after ye good disposicion and demes- 
hyng of my said executors : Also, I woll that any wronges 
or extorcions dewly proved byfor 'my executours, by me 
and my lyve don, that ye same myn executours satisfie 
hem agreablely as yer good discrecion wol seme best to 
discharge, and for the helth of my soule; and after ye ac- 
quietaill of my seyd detts, wrongs, and extorcions, I wole 
yat my seyde executors, havyng tendir consideracion of 
souche of my servants, as well of women as men, as have 
longist don most trewe and diligent servise to me and litil 



* She was the eldest daughter, and ultimately sole heir of 
Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, son of Kisg Edward 
III. and was 90 years old 1st Henry IV. ; she married, first, Tho- 
mas Earl of Stafford, but he dying before consummation, she mar- 
ried his brother Edward, fifUi Earl of Stafford, K. G. who was 
killed at the^ battle of Shrewsbury 4 Henry IV. ; her second or 
rather third husband was William Bourgchier, Earl of Ewe, in 
Normandy, K.G. who died 8 Henry V. ; she died 17 Henry VI. 
Dugdale. 



S38 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA, 

▼eleuid ^ by me, or nought, yat yey aftir their wel avised 
discrecions rewarde ecbe of hem aftir yeire degre and de- 
series coQupeteotly for their help and Telyf, as ferforth as 
ye power of my seid executors will wole stretche in that 
partie* And also, my seyde detts, wrongis, and exlorciohs, 
and rewards of my 3iervant8, paid and satisfied ; I bequetbe 
XX /|. y^rly, to be paied by the band of my seid executourt 
fpi termQ of yxyere, to the pri^tis.of certen landis and 
tenements, beyng in ye handys.of my feofies, to do dyvyne 
scxvise dayly for me during ye seide terme in ye College of 
P)ecy*,, after the forpae of my will% which I have before 
m.aad ftnd writyn, seded undir my seal : And for ye per*- 
fqrmyng of yis my last will» bequests, and ordinances, be^ 
fore rebersid, I mak^ and ordeine my wel beloved sonea 
Thomas byssbop of Worcestre% Henry Erie of Eue, Will* 
Bourghchiers S Job' Bourgbchiers % Sir Nicol Wymbussh, 
Clerk, Sir Roger Aston, Knyght, John Fray, Robard 
Framptpn, Barons of ye Estcbecur, and Will' Palmer^ 
piyn executors, to execute and put in effect,, as well ye pri^i 
messes, and to distribute and dispone in almesse dede wber 
yey shull seme most niedeful and meritory- for ye helte of 
my soule, besecbyng and requirynge ye ryght reverent 
fadir in Ood Will' ^ Bysaop of Lincoln, and my wel beloved 



* i. e. who^were slightly or not at all rewarded by her. 
. * Founded by her father, Thomas of Woodstock. 

* This will is not supposed to be extant. Vide note to Royal 

Wills, p,, 279, 

* By her third husband. Thomas Bourchier, who was elected 
Bfshop of Winchester 1435, Ely 1443, Archbishop of Canterbury 
1454, which see he held 32 years. Cardinal of St. Cyriac 1464, 
anddymg in 1486, was buried on the north side of the choir of 
his Cathedral. See his tomb. Dart, p. 163. 

« Her third son Lord Fitx*^Warine in right of his first wife. He 
died after 12 Edward IV. Dugdale's Baronage, vol. ii, p. 131. 

*» Her fourth son Lord Bemers, K. G. in right of his wife ; died 
14 £. IV. Dugdale*s Baronage, vol. ii. p. 132. 

' William Alnwick, who was translated from the Bishoprick of 
Norwich to that of Lincoln in 1436, and died in 1459. 



T^STAMSNXA VBTUSTA, £39 

spoe Hamfrey Erie of Stafford !|. to have tendre sai:vieu8 of 
ye e£fect of y» my pree^at t«9tameQty du^ w^d trewly to bei 
perfqnped. la witoease whereof to yis my present tegta-s 
ment I set my seal; wretyn the xvi day of Octobr' ye 
yeare of ye reigne of Kyng Henry the Vlth^ after the 
qaest ye xviithe. 



THOMAS LORD COBHAM. 

Thomas 3rooke, Lord Cobham% February Id, 1438^ 
My body to be buried in the north aisle of the Church of 
Thomcombe* And I appoint my wife, and Edward, my 
SOD, my e^^ecutors. 



ISABEL COUNTESS OF WARWICK. 

. Isabel Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick^, December 
1, 1439- My body to be buried in the. Abbey of Tewks-i 
bury ; and I desire . that my great Templys % with the Ba« 
leys % be sold to the utmost, and delivered to the Monks 
of that house, '' so that they.grutched not with my burial 
there." Also I will that my statue be made, all naked^ 
with my hair cast backwards, according to the design and 
model which Thomas Porchalion has for that purpose, 
with Mary Magdalen laying herhand across, and St. John 



' E« G. her son by her first husband. 

* He married Joan, the daughter and heir of Sir Reginald Bray- 
broke, by Joan, the grand-daughter and heir of John Lord Cob- 
hara, in whose right he called himself Lord Cobham. • 

» Query, 1438-9? 

« She was the daugliter of Thomas le Despencer, Earl of Glou- 
cester, and second wife of Ridiard fifUi Earl of Warwick, K. G. 

* Explained by Dugdale to mean jewels hanging on women's 
foreheads by bodkins thrifst into their hair. 

^ Pale or peach coloured rubies. Ibid. 



240 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

tbe Evangelist od the right side, and St. Anthoby on the 
left ; at my feet a scutcheon, impaling my arms with those 
of the Earl my husband, supported by two griffins, but on 
the sides thereof the statues of poor men and women in 
their poor array, with their beads in their hands. I desire 
that a chalice be made of my great Sharpe \ and offered 
to our Lady in the Lady Chapel at Tewksbury; and to 
our Lady of Caversham I bequeath a crown of gold made 
of my chain, weighing twenty-five pounds, and other broken 
gold in my cabinet ; and two tables, the one of St. Katherine, 
the other of St. George, the precious stones of which tablets 
to be set in the said crown. I will that my tablet, with the 
image of our Lady, having a glass for it, be offered unto 
our Lady of Walsyngham, as also my gown of green 
alyz cloth of gold, with wide sleeves ; and a tabernacle of 
silver, like in the timber to that over our Lady of Caver- 
sham. To our Lady of Worcester my great image of 
wax now in London; to the Abbey of Tewksbury my 
wedding gown, and all my cloths of gold and cloths of 
silk without furs, excepting one of russet velvet, which 1 
bequeath to St. Winifred. I desire that all my precious 
stones and pearls be sold, as also my silver vessels and goods, 
for the performance of my said will. And I appoint Sir 
William Montfort, John Nanfan, and John Norris, my 
executors*. Proved 4ih February, 1439-40. 



LADY MARGERY MOLINES. 

Lady Margery Molines*, Saturday next before the Feast 
of the Nativity of the blessed Virgin', 1439. My body to 
be buried in the Chancel of the Church of Stoke Fogeys, 



" Query? 

*^ Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 347* 

• Apparently the widow of Sir William Lord Molines, who was 
slain at the siege of Orleans 7 Henry VI. 
' September 5 th. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 241 

near my hasband. And I appoiat Thomas Blount, Eliza- 
bethy his wife, and John Fitzsymonds, my executors. 
Proved 12th June, 1439> by John Fitzsymonds. 



JOAN LADY ZOUCHE. 

Joan Lady Zouche, June 5, 1439. My body to be 
buried in the Parish Church of Si. Olave. And I appoint 
John Bramshotti Esquire, my executor. Proved July ?» 
1439. 



JOHN DUKE OF BEDFORD. 

John Duke of Bedford, Governor and Regent of France *, 
at Rouen, 10th September, 1435. He* bequeathed hi^ 
body to be buried in the Church of the Blessed Maryjof 
Rouen, if be died in Normandy ; if in Picardy, in the 
Church of the Blessed Mary of Morivele; and in the event 
of his dying in England, in the Abbey or Monastery of 
Waltham, in the Diocese of London. He willed that all 
bis debts should in the first place be paid. To the Church 
in which he should be buried all the ornaments and vest- 
ments of his Chapel, and a cup of gold which he had made 
at Touroelles, in Paris, by Stephen Allovus, his'^olSsmith. 
Also he bequeathed to the aforesaid Church a cross of sil- 
ver gilt, " cum buretis," which he had in the ransom of 
John Alcurons. To the illustrious Princess Lady Jacobe', 

' He was the tliird son of King Henry IV. was created Earl of 
Kendal and Duke of Bedford by bis brother Henry V. and in the 
reign of Henry VI, was constituted Regent of France, and was a 
renowned warrior; he died at Paris 1 4th September 1435, s. p. h 
and was buried at Rouen. 

^ The third person is used in the copy of this Will given in '' Royal 
Wills,*' p. 270 ; it appears to have been a noncupative testament. 

* Jaquetta, daughter of Peterof Luxemburgh Earl of St. Paul, his 
second wife, who survived him, and married Sir Richard Widvile, 

R 



242 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

his wife, all his lands, tenements, 8ic. '^ sive ex conquestu 
8i?e ex proprio/' whether in France or England, during 
her life, only excepting the castle, lands, and lordship of 
Harapute, which he bequeathed to Richard the bastard of 
Bedford, his natural son, for his life, and after the decease 
of his said consort, and of the said Richard, hfi bequeathed 
that all his lands, tenements, &c. should remain to our 
Lord Henry King of France and England, whom he named 
and constituted his heir. And be appointed the Reverend 
Fathers in Christ, Henry Cardinal of England ', commonly 
so called; Louis, Bishop of Terouenne, Chancellor of 
France, his uncle*; John Archbishop of York'; Lord 
Ralph Cromwell, Lord of Cromwell, Treasurer of England ; 
Sir John FalstofT, Master of his Household % Sir Andrew 
Ogard, his Chamberlain, Knights; Richard Boukeland, 
Treasurer of Calais, and Robert Whittyngham, his Re- 
ceiver General in England, Esquires, his executors. Wit- 
nessed by Sir Gerard de Montfranc, Chamberlain to the 



afterwards Earl Rivers, who is styled by Stow, " a lusty Knight," 
contrary to the wishes of her uncle the Bishop of Turwyne, and of 
Louis Earl of St. Paul, her brother. By Earl Rivers she had seve- 
ral children, and among them Elizabeth, who married to her se- 
cond husband King Edward IV. 

' Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester. 

^ His wife*s uncle, mentioned in the preceding note ; he died in 
1448. C^'^^) 

^ John Kemp, who was Archbishop of York in 1425, Cardinal 
of St. Balbina in 1439, and translated to Canterbury in 1452; he 
died in 1453, and has a magnificent monument. 

* Knight of the Garter. Buswell states, that the Duke of Bed- 
ford divested him of the insignia of that order, believing him to 
have evinced cowardice in the presence of the enemy, but that on 
explanation they were restored to him, and by the Regent's naming 
him one of his executors it is manifest that his displeasure was not 
permanent. Sir John Falstofle is said to have been Governor of 
Anjou and Maine, and Baron of Singiule in France, and to have 
died circa 1425. His name is known to the admirers of Shak- 
speare by the freedom with which the immortal bard has tredted 
him. 



TESTAMENTA VJBTUSTA. S43 

said Testator; Sir Nicholas Bardet, Knights; Master Peter 
Yrforde, Professor qF Sacred Theology, Confessor; Robert 
Warde, Almoner ; Master John de Rawmeris, and Master 
Pbiliber-to Furnein, Physician to the aforesaid Lord ; Henry 
ClyiFord; Richard Leland, Treasurer of the Household; 
Johq de Dupater, Reginald de Birsingham, ^'hostiariis 
camere;" Brian Stapiltoni Johanne de Mortimer, Chev. 
de Burnieby, Thomas Dampore, Esquires, John Scruby, 
Robert Maiityn, and others. William Manchon, Notary, 
&G. Proved before Henry Chiqheley, Archbishop of Cas- 
terbiu-y, at liambeth, 7th October, 1441 *. 



«»••' 



RICHARD LORD GREY OF WILTON. 

Richard Grey Lord of Wilton % at Blechel®, August 
12, 144£. My body to be buried in the Church of Oar 
Lady at Blechelae. To Margaret, my wife, my manor of 
Baryll*Hall, in the county of Essex, for her lifet* 



HENRY WALPOOL. ESQ. 

Henry Walpool% at Houghton, on Friday the Feast of 
St. Cruse', 144%. My body to be buried in the Church 
of St. Martin of Howton, near my wife ; and I will that 
my executors bestow xx marks to the fabrick of that 
Church, and xx marks on masses, and other works of 
piety, for my soul, and the souls of my parents, friends. 



' In 3 Henry V. he was of the retinue of Thomas Earl of Dor- 
set in the expedition into Normandy, and died on Monday next 
before the Assumption of our Lady, ISth August 1448. 

* Royal Wills, p. 270. 

t From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 714. 

* Apcestor of the Right Honourable the Earl of Orford. 

, ' Query, St. Chrys, January 27th, which day however fell in 
1442 on a Saturday ? 

R 2 



2M TESTAMENTA VfiTUSTA. 

and benefactors, and all the faithful deceased. To Martin', 
my son, an annuity daring his life of • . • out of my ma- 
nors of Howton, Harpele, and Westrudaai; also all those 
lands which Katherine, my sister, had of the gift of Henry, 
my father, deceased, for term of her life; to Henry, my 
son, and his heirs male, my manors of Houghton, &c. and 
in default of issue, I will that the said manors descend to 
John, my son, and his heirs male; failing such, to Wil- 
liam, Martin, and Thomas, my sons, and their heirs male 
respectively; and in default of which to Katherine and 
Alice, my daughters. In case my said children die with-^ 
out issue, I desire my feoffees and executors to sell the 
said manors, and dispose of the money in pious works, for 
the good of my soul and the soul of Margaret my wife, as 
well as. the souls of my parents, friends, and benefactors, 
and all the faithful deceased. To Henry, my son and 
heir, my manor of Walpole, with the appurtenances, to him 
and his heirs male ; in default of which, to my other sons 
and daughters before mentioned; to John, my son, my 
manor of Istede, in Suffolk, he paying to William and 
Thomas, my sons, an annuity of xii marks during their 
lives; and in default of heirs male of the said John, I will 
that the said manor de^tcend to my sons and daughters 
aforesaid. The residue of my goods, 8cc. not bequeathed, 
I give to Henry,' my son, Edward Povy, and William Mar- 
chale, Esquires, and Hugh Wynehowe, Chaplain, whom 
I appoint my executors. Proved at Norwich, June 27^ 
1442*. 



SIR HUMPHREY STAFFORD, KNT. 

Humphrey Stafford, Knight*, December 14, 1442. My 
body to be buried in the Chapel of St. Anne, in the Abbey 



* From the abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. v. p. 36, ed. 1779. 
> Of Hooke, grandfather of Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Devon ; 
he died soon after the date of his will. 



TESTAJilBNTA VETUSTA. ^245 

of Abbotsbury ^ To John, my brother. Bishop of Bath 
and Wells, a pair of flaggons of silver gilt ; to Humphrey, 
my grandson, son to Sir John Stafford, Knight, my son % 
twelve dishes of silver and one trussing- bed; to William 
Stafford, my son, all my plate of silver, and likewise of gilt, 
not already bequeathed. I will that c/. in money, after 
one month next after my death, be spent upon my funeral 
at Abbotsbury, amongst priests, poor people, and others 
coming thereto*. 



SIR SIMON FELBRIGGE, KNT. 

Simon Felbrigge', Knight, at Felbrigge, 1st Septem- 
ber, 10th Henry VI. 1431. Whereas I am seized of the 
manors of Felbrigge, Aylmerton, Routon, Bannyngham, 
Colby, Totyngton, Halle, and Ingworth, in Norfolk ; 
Brigenorth, in the county of Suffolk ; Sharpenho and 
Stratelee, in Bedfordshire, conjointly with Katberine, my 
wife, for life, with remainder to Ralph Lord Cromwell, 
Robert Lord Willoughby, Thomas Lord Scales, William 
Lord Bardolf, John Clifton, Knight, Robert Clifton, 
Knight, William Paston of Paston, Philip Calthorpe, 
Esquire, Oliver Gras, Esquire, William Ydverton, Nicho- 
las Appleyard, Esquire, 8cc. to fulfil this my last will. To 
Alans, my daughter, wife of Thomas Wanton, Knight, 
and the heirs of her body, my manors of Brigenorth, Shar- 
penho, and Stratdee, with remainder, in default of such 
heirs, to the right heirs of the body of John Felbrigge, 
Knight, 8cc. remainder to Richard Felbrigge, &c. reniaia* 
der to John Felbrigge, brother of the said Richard ; to 

* Which he built there at his own charge, joining it to the Cha- 
pel of St. Andrew the Apostle, wherein the body of his father lay 
buried. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 172. 

* By Anne, daughter of William Lord Botreaux. Ibid. 

* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vd. i. p.' 172- 

3 Query, if he was not elected a Knight of the Garter temp. 
Henry V. and became the 114 th Knight of that Order ? 



S46 TESTAMENTA VEtUSTA, 

my daughter Ahna^ a nun at Bruslerd. And I appoint 
Katherine^ my wife, and Oliver Gras, my executors. 
Proved 20th February, 1443 »m 



JOHN LORD FANHOPE- 

John Cornwall, Knight, Lord Fanhope*, Tuesday, De- 
cember lOy 1443. My body to be buried in the Chapel of 
the Blessed Virgin, by me founded, in the church-yard of 
the Friars Preachers, near Ludgate, in the City of Lon- 
don. To the Convent of those Friars, and their succes- 
sors, a yearly rent of xl marks, to be received from the 
Company of Fishmongers within that City, for the cele- 
bration of divine service in the said Chapel, according to 
the tenor of a certain indenture made between the 8a:id 
Convent and myself. To John, my bastard son, now at 
Ampthill, ccc marks ; and in case he should die before he 
attain the age of twenty-one, 1 will that Thomas, my other 
bastard son, shall have the said ccc marks *• 



SIR REGINALD COBHAM, KNT. 

Reginald Cobham', August 12, 1445, 24th Henry VI.« 
My body to be buried in the Collegiate Church of Ling- 
field, before the high altar. I will that a tomb of alabaster 

" Query, 1443-4? 

• 105th Knight of the Garter. In the 2d of Henry IV. he married 
Elizabeth Plantagenet, widow of John Earl of Huntingdon^ and 

^Sii^f- sister of Henry IV. ; he was created Lord Fanhope 17th July, 1 1 
Henry VI. and 20 Henry VI. Baron of Milbroke, and died soon 
after the date of his will without legitimate issue. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 213. 
3 Of Sterborough. 

« August 12th, 1445, is the 23d of Henry VI. 



T£9TAM£NTA VETUSTA. 247 

be placed there for my monament; and that xl/. be al- 
lowed for the expences of my faoeral, for my trentali and 
alms to poor people at that solemnity. To Anne, my wife ', 
all my household goods in my Castle at Sterborough, at 
the time of my decease; and I will that during her life she 
shall have the use of all the furniture of my Chapel in that 
Castle; and after her death the said furniture to remain to 
the Master of the Collegiate Church of St. Peter at Linge* 
feld, by me lately founded^ to the priests therein, and their 
sueceasdrs for ever. And I constitute Sir Thomas Cob- 
ham. Knight, my son, one of my executors ^. 



WILLIAM PASTON, ESQ. 

William Paston, of Paston, co. Norfolk, Esquire % 1444. 
My father, Clement; my wife, Agnes; John, my son and 
heir; my sons, Edmond, William, and Clement; and Eli- 
zabeth, my daughter f. 



SIR WALTER LUCY, KNT. 

Walter Lucy, Knight, 1444. Sir William Lucy^ Knight, 
my eldest son, by Eleanor, my wife j;. 

' His second wife ; she was the daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Lord Bardolf, and widow of Sir William Clifford, Knight< 

* Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 69. 

« From this family was descended Robert Paston^ who was cre- 
ated Baron Paston, Viscount, and afterwards £arl of Yarmouth, 
which dignities became extinct in 1733. The curious and inte- 
resting correspondence of the Paston family in the reigns of Henry 
VI. Edward IV. &c. is well known to every person interested in 
the history and manners of his country.. 

t Ex inform. George Baker, Esq. % Ibid. 



248 TESTAMKNTA VETUSTA. 



SIR JOHN THROCKMORTON, KNT. 

John ThrockmortoDy Knight*, 1445. My wife, Eleanor; 
mj eldest daughter, wife of John Russell; my second 
daughter, wife of Thomas Winslowe; my third daughter, 
wife of John Rous ; my fourth daughter, married to Ro- 
bert GiiFard; my fifth daughter, wife of Thomas Green; 
my sixth daughter, married to Richard Knightley. I ap- 
point my sons, Thomas* and John', and my wife Eleanor, 
my executors; and Sir Ralph Boteler, Lord of Sudley, and 
Treasurer of England, overseer of this my Will *. 



JOHN HOFTOFT. 

John Hoftoft, of Knebworth. I bequeath to t;he Priests 
of Knebworth cc marks, to sing for my soul ; to the poor 
XX marks. I will that one thousand masses be said on the 
day of my burial, at Hertford and in London. Richard 
Nowers and John Nowers, my wife's sons. And I consti- 
tute my son, John Barro, my wife, and Thomas Ledburne, 
my executors. Proved 10th May, 1443 f. 

^ Son of John Throckmotton, who was Escheatbr of the county 
of Worcester 3 Henry IV. and Constable of Elmley Castle 6 Henry 
IV. The testator was in the service of Richard Earl of Warwick 
at Caen, in Normandy 5 Henry V. and having been brought up to 
the study of the law was afterwards his counsel ; he married Ele- 
anor^ daughter and coheir of Sir Guy de Spineto, Lord of Cough- 
ton, CO, Warwick, and died l^th April 1 445, leaving his said wife 
surviving. 

* Ancestor of Sir George Courtenay Throckmorton, sixth and 
present Baronet. 

* From whom descended Sir William Throckmorton, who was 
created a Baronet 9 James I. but which title is now extinct. 

* Ex. inform. George Baker, Esquire. f Ibid. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 949 

SIR WILLIAM CHENEY, KNT. 

William Cheney, Knight '. My body to be buried in 
the Church of St. Bene't, near Paul's Wharf, London, 
near the body of Margaret, my wife. To John, my son, 

cccc /. and all at Stoke and Trapeseles. And I ap« 

point Thomas Lucy, and Margaret, my daughter, my exe- 
cutors *. 



CARDINAL BEAUFORT. 

I, Henry, commonly called Cardinal of England, Bishop 
of Winchester*. My body to be buried in my Church 
of Winchester, in the place I have appointed. I will that 
every day three masses be celebrated for my soul by three 
Monks of that Church, in the Chapel of my sepulture. 
And that the name of Henry Cardinal be pronounced, and 
that in celebrating, the souls of John Duke of Lancaster, 
and Katherine his wife, my parents, the souls of Henry IV. 
and Henry V. Kings of England, John Earl of Somerset, 

' There is no date assigned to this will in the abstract obligingly 
sent to the Ecptor by George Baker, Esq. but as it is placed be- 
tween wills dated in 1443, it is presumed to have been written in 
that year. 

* In an abstract of this will in Harl. MSS. 6148, the testator is 
said to mention William Sondes his cousin. 

* Henry Beaufort, second son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lan- 
caster, by Katherine Swinford, and who, with his brothers and sister 
were fully legitimated by Act of Parliament 90 Richard II. ** excepta 
dtgnitate regali/* and having entered into holy orders was conse- 
crated Bishop of Lincoln in 1397 ; was translated to Winchester in 
1404 ; and constituted Cardinal of St. Eusebius by Pope Martin V* 
His connection with the blood royal produced his early elevation 
to the episcopal dignity^ and his great prudence and frugality ren- 
dered him an important personage of his times, the latter produc- 
ing him that influence which immense wealth never fails to create, 
and the former securing him from the dangerous consequences ge- 
nerally attendant upon an elevated station. He was four times 
Chancellor of England, and when Henry V. invaded France the 



250 TSSTAIIRNTA VXTUSTA. 

Thomas Duke of Exeter, mj brothers, Johanna Countess of 
Westmoreland, my sister, and John Duke of Bedford, be 
specially remembered. I will that my funeral be not cele- 
brated in too pompous a manner, but according to the 
state iti which God shall be pleased that I shall die, and 
atcdrdidg to the disctetion of my executors. I will that 
teii thousand masses be said for my soul as soon as pos- 
sible after my decease, namely, three thousand of requiem, 
three thousand ''de rurate cobU dtmpet^^ three thousand 
of the Holy -Ghost, and one thousand of the Trinity. I 
will that the Prior of my said Church of Winchester, and 
the Content of thestane^ have ccfi. and my better cup and 
patten, and my Testment embroidered, which I bought of 
Hugh Dyke, on condition that none should use the vest- 
ment but the Bishop of Winchester, or whoever may of- 
ficiate in presence of the King, Queen, and King's eldest 
6on. I remit to the Abbey and Convent of St. Augustine be- 
yond Canterbury, cccucvi IL xiii <• mid. which they owe me» 
on condition that they cause my name to be inserted in three 
masses daily. I will that cccc U. be distributed among the 
prisoners, whether for crimes or for debt, in both Comp- 
ters of London, in Newgate, Ludgate, Fleets Marshals^a* 
King's Bench, and in confinement within my manor of 
Southwarky for their liberation, by the hands of some con- 
scientious men selected and appointed by my executors. 
Item, I will that two thousand marks be distributed among 
my poor tenants in the counties of Hampshire^ Wilts, 

Cardinal lent him 4£.i20,€00 on the crown jewels, to ndiich he al- 
ludes in the codicils to his will. 

Rapin remarks that he died firom despair that his riches could 
not exempt him from death, and Shakspeare thus beautifully al- 
ludes to it : 

<< If thou beest death, 1 11 give thee England^s treasure, 
Enough to purchase such another island, 
So thou wilt let me live and feel no pain.*' 

Second Part Henry VI. act iii. scene a. 

Hence it is evident that an unusual attachment to life had been 
handed down as a characteristic of this celebrated prelate. He 
died nth April 1447- 



T£STAMi£NTA VfetUSTA. 251 

Stttlrey> Somerset, Oxford, Berks, and Bucks, and I desire 
that this distribution be made either in money or other / 
things which may be considered more useful to them, in 
the manner expressed in the preceding article, viz. by the^ 
hands of some men of good conscience, according to the 
nomination and discretion of my executors; which persons 
80 appointed shall receive for their trouble what to my 
executors may appear reasonable. Item^ I bequeath to my 
Lord King Hebry a tablet with reliques, which is called the 
Tablet of Boarbon, and a cup of gold, with a ewer, which 
belonged to the illustrious prince his father, and offered by 
him on Easter Eve, and out of which cup he usually drunk, 
and for the last time drank, humbly praying him to aid my 
executors in whatever can tendt the good of my soul; 
as God knows I have alwavs been faithful and zealous 
to him in all which related to his prosperity, wishing 
to effect whatever could tend to his welfare in soul 
and body. Item, I bequeath to Johanna >, wife of Edward 
Stradlyng, Knight, two dozen dishes, four chargers, xii 
salt-cellars, &c. and c li. in gold. Item, I bequeath to Hans 
Nulles XL li. I will that the Clerks of my Chapel in my 
service at the time of my decease, and attending my body 
to the place of burial, be rewarded with c marks between 
them, according to the discretion of my executors. I will 
that my debts be paid before any other thing. I will that 
two thousand pounds be distributed according to the dis- 
cretion of my executors among my domestic servants, ac- 
cording to their degrees; but I desire nevertheless that 
Hans Nulles be contented with what I have bequeathed 
him, and that he be not included4n the distribution among 
my other servants. I will that the residue of my goods not 
disposed of be applied to works of charity and pious uses, 
according to the discretions and consciences of my execu^ 
tors, such as relieving poor religious-houses, marrying poor 



■ Said to have been his natural daughter by Alice, daughter of 
Richard Earl of Arundel, and sister of Thomas Fitz-Alan alias 
Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury; she married Sir Edward 
Stradling, of Glamorganshire, Knight. 



9S9 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

maidens, succouring the poor and needy, and in other 
similar works of piety, such as they may most deem will 
tend to the health of my soul. And of this my will I con- 
stitute and appoint the Reverend Father in Christ, the 
Cardinal and Archbishop of York ', my nephew the Mar- 
quess of Dorset', Brother Richard Vyall, Prior of the 
Church of Witham, of the Carthusian Order; Master Ste- 
phen Wilton, Archdeacon of Winchester, my Chancellor ; 
Richard Waller, Esquire, Master of my Household ; Wil- 
liam Whaplode Steward of the Lands of my Bishoprick ; 
William Mareys, my Treasurer of Wolveseye; William 
Toly; and William Port, my executors. And for the 
trouble which I shall occasion my said executors, I be- 
queath to the said Reverend Father cc li. and a cup of 
gold of the value of xl/i.; to my said nephew, the Mar- 
quess, cc li, and a cup of gold worth forty pounds, and to 
each of my other executors aforesaid c /t. Dated in my 
Paldce of Wolvesey, 20th January, 1446. 

FIRST CODICIL. 

I, Henry, Cardinal of England, Bishop of Winchester, 
after my Will signed and sealed, dated 20th January, 1446, 
wishing to make a certain distribution of my goods which 
did not occur to my mind when I made the said Will, now 
add this Codicil. First, I bequeath to the Prior and Con- 
vent of Christ's Church, Canterbury mli. of which sum I 
will thatv* marks be applied ''ad solucionem faciend' pro 
manerio 8c dominio de Bekesbourne," near Canterbury, 
and the remainder of the said sum of uli. to the fabrick of 
the said Church. Also I will that the said Prior and Con- 
vent give security to my executors, named in my said Will, 
that they will cause three masses to be daily celebrated for 
ever, by three Monks of the said Church, for my soul, in 
my Church of Winchester, as is expressed in my said 
Will; and also that they solemnly observe my obit every 

* John Kemp. 

* Edmund Beaufort, K. G. who was created Duke of Somerset 
26 Henry VI. and was slain at St. Alban*s 22d May 1455. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, ^3 

year. I bequeath to the work and fabrick of the Charch 
of Lincoln cclu and I desire that the Dean and Canons of 
the said Church observe the day of my obit every year for 
ever, &c. Item, I bequeath to my Lord the King my dish 
or plate of gold for spices, and my cup of gold enamelled 
with images. Item, since other jewels and vessels of silver 
and gold which were pledged by the King and Parliament 
for certain sums lent, &c.' Also, I bequeath to my old 
servant, Richard Petteworth, c /i. that he may pray for my 
soul. Dated at my Palace of Wolvesey, 7th April, 1447. 

SECOND CODICIL. 

I, Henry, Cardinal of England, and Bishop of Winches- 
ter, make this Codicil to my former Will and Codicil. 
Whereas I have in the said Codicil disposed of certain 
jewels and vases pledged to me by the Parliament, &c. 
Item, I bequeath to my Lady the Queen, "lectum blodium 
de panno aureo de Damasco," which hung in her chamber 



^ The following note explanatory of this passage, is taken from 
Royal Wills, p. 334. 

** The Bishop lent the King at one time * pour Tesploit de v're 
present voyage vers les parties de France & Normandie, a v*re 
tres grand besoigne & necessite & pur Taise de v're povre commu- 
nalte de Engleterre * 4^14,000. and ^8,306. IBs, Sd. was then due 
* a sa auncien creance a vous fait, come piert par vos honurables let* 
ters patentz a luy ent faitz, et a vos ditz commimes ministres,' say 
the Commons in their petition 9 Henry V. 1,414, desiring to have it 
confirmed, and the letters patent enrolled in Parliament. For the 
j^l4,000 the King made over, in the fifth year of his reign, the 
duties and customs of a certain import at Southampton ; and when 
the Bishop had reimbursed himself to the amount of ^R,306. IBs* 
8d. he lent the King another ^14,000, making in all gS9Q,306. IBs. 
Sd. for which the said customs were again mortgaged to him and 
the cocket of the said port and its dependencies ; which grant was 
confirmed in the above Parliament. Rot. Pari. iv. p. 138 — 135« 
But a good deal of the loan remained at the time of the Bishop's 
death, as appears by this codicil. The King redeemed in 1439 the 
sword of Spain and other jewels which had been pledged to the 
Cardinal for j£493. 6$. Bd" Rymer, vol. x. p. 509. 



254 TBSTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 

in my mitnor of Waltham, in which my said Lady the 
Queen lay when she was at the said manor. I bequeath 
and remit to Lord Tiptoft the cccxxxiii/t. vis. viiid. 
which the said Lord by his writing is bound to me. In 
the same manner^ I bequeath and remit to William Staf- 
ford all which he oweth me, which is the sum of c H. pro- 
vided that, the said William, by his deed sufficiently exe^ 
cuted, acquits as well my executors as Master Thomas 
Forest, Master or Keeper of the Hospital of the Holy 
Cross near Winchester, and his colleagues, of the sum of 
XL li. in which I am bound to him, by reason of an annuity 
of XX li. granted to him, with power to distrain for the 
same in the manor of Heynstrigge, now appropriated to 
the said Hospital. Item, I bequeath to John, Bastard of 
Somerset*, cccc/t. with a certain quantity of vessels of 
silver, according to the discretion of my executors. Item, 
I bequeath in a like manner to William Swynford, my 
nephew*, cccc/t. with a certain quantity of silver vesseb^ 

' There is much difficulty in ascertaining who was the person 
80 described : the editor of Royal Wills supposes him to have 
been John, elder brother of the testator, but this conjecture is de- 
cidedly erroneous, for the said John died many years before, and 
for whose soul the Cardinal in his will orders prayers to be said. 
This '* John, bastard of Somerset,*' was most probably a natural son 
of the said John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset, or of John Beaufort, 
his eldest son, who was created Duke of Somerset 21st Henry VL 
and who died in the following year. 

' This bequest satisfactorily proves that Sir Thomas Swinford, 
the son of Sir Hugh Swinford, by Katherine, Maughter and coheir 
of Sir Payne de Roet (which Katherine was first the concubine 
and afterwards the wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and 
by him mother of Cardinal Beaufort) had issue the above-men- 
tioned William Swinford ; for as the Cardinal and Sir Thomas Swin- 
ford were brothers of the half blood, he would of course call the 
son of the said Sir Thomas his nephew. This circumstance is thus 
particularly mentioned, from so little being known of the issue of 
Katherine Duchess of Lancaster by her first husband; for Godwin, 
in his laboured and valuable life of Chaucer^ states his inability to 
give any account of her son, the said Sir Thomas Swinford. Wil- 



TE8TAMENTA VSTVSTA. 055 

Item, I bequeath to Thotnas Buroebyi Page to my Lady 
the Queen, xx/i, and a cup of silver gilt. Item, I bequeatli 
to Edward Stradliug, Knight \ a certain portion of silver 
vessels, according to the discretion of my executors. Item, 
I bequeath to John Yend, seqior, xii dishes of silver. 
Dated in my Palace of Wolvesey^gthApril, 1447. Proved 
2d September, 1447*. 



JOHN DUKE OF EXETER. 

John Holland, Duke of Exeter', July 16, 25th Henry VI. 
1447* My body to be buried in a Chapel in the Church 
of St. Katherine beside the Tower of London, at the North 
end of the high alt$r, in a tomb there ordained for me and 
Anne my first wife% ad also for my sister Constance and 
Anne my wife^ now living. To the high altar of the said 
Church a cup of byrel, garnished with gold^ pearls, and 

liam Swinford here mentioned was the first cousin once removed 
of Thomas Chaucer^ the eldest son of the Poet Geofirey Chaucer, 
and second cousin to Alice, his daughter and heiress, who is no- 
ticed in note * p. 215, and who died 20th May 1475. 

' Husband of his natural daughter. Vide a former note. 

^ Wolvesey House or Castle (as Bishop Pontisara styled it in 
1300) was built by Bishop Blois s^out the year 1138^ and in Cam- 
den's time was very spacious and surrounded by many towers, but 
was demolished in the Civil Wars. Its ruins are extensive and 
magnificent. Royal Wills, p. 341. 

* Royal Wills, p. 321. 

3 Knight of the Garter, son of John Holland, Earl of Hunting- 
don, K. G. by Elizabeth, daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of 
Lancaster, and sister of Henry the Fourth ; he was created Duke 
of Exeter 21 Henry VI. and died 5th August 1446, aged about 49 
years. 

« The daughter of Edmund Earl of Stafford, K. G. and widow 
of Edmund Earl of March ; she died 10 Henry VI. 

^ Daughter of John Earl of Salisbury, who survived him. Vide 
her will in a following page. 



856 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

precious stones, to put the Holy Sacrament in. Al^o a 
chalice of gold» with the whole furniture of my Chapel. I 
will that another chalice, two basons, two candlesticks of 
silver, with two pair of vestments, a mass-book, a pax-bred 
and a .pair of cruets of silver, be given to that little Chapel, 
for the priests that should celebrate divine service therein, 
atid pray for our souls; to the Priests, and Clerks and 
others, of the House of St. Katherine, for their great labour 
and observance on the day of my obit and day of my fune- 
ral, XL marks. I will that four honest and cunning priests 
be provided, to pray perpetually every year for my soul 
in the said Chapel, and for the souls of Anne my first wife, 
of my sister Constance, and of Anne my present wife, 
when she shall pass out of this world, and for the souls of 
all my ancestors; to Anne, my daughter, my white bed 
with popinjayes; to my son. Sir Henry \ all the stuff of 
my wardrobe, and of my arras. I will that my feoffees of 
my manors of Stevynton, Barford, St. Martin, and Hamer- 
viez, after my testament be performed, make an estate to 
my said son. Sir Henry, of those manors: provided always, 
that ah annuity of xl /. be reserved for my two bastard sons, 
William and Thomas *» 



WILLIAM MARQUESS OF SUFFOLK. 

William de la Pole, Marquess of Suffolk •, January 17, 
U48-9, 27th Henry VI, My body to be buried in the 
Charter-house at Hull ; and I will that an image of myself, 
and another of my wife, be made in stone, and I desire 



* Who succeeded his father and married Ann, sister of Edward 
IV. but died s. p. circa 13 Edward IV. 

* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol.ii. p. 81. 

s Knight of the Garter ; he was beheaded in a cock boat in 
Dover Roads 2d May 28 Henry VI. a very minute account of 
which will be found in the Paston Letters, alluded to in a former 
note. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 257 

tbai the masses which I have foanded thci^e for myself and 
her be daily sang over my grave*. 



^^ 



WALTER LORD HUNGERFORD. 

Walter Hudgerford, Knight, Lord of Hungerford, Hay- 
tesbtiry, and Hornet', July 1, 27th Henry VI. 1449. My 
body to be buried in the Cathedral Church of Salisbury, in 
the Chapel within the second afch from the belfry, on the 
north part of the body of the Church westwards^ built to 
the honour of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin, at 
my costs, in which Chapel I have founded a perpetual 
chantry for two chaplains, and wherein Katherine, my 
wife*, is buried. I will that if any thing be deficient, 
either in the foundation, endowment, or statutes of this 
chantry, or of that which I have founded in the Church at 
Farley Hungerford, or in my chantries at Haytesbury 
and Chipenham, whereby my intention may be fulfilled, 
that an accomplishment thereof be made with all speed, 
and whatever ornaments are wanting in either of them I 
desire may be supplied by my executors. To the Canons 
Resident, Vicars, Choristers, and Chantry Priests, in the 
Cathedral of Salisbury, and other officers belonging to 
that Church, to celebrate the office of the dead, and like- 
wise to sing masses and perform other solemnities on the 
day of my funeral, the sum of x /. to be distributed amongst 
them in such manner as in like cases has been accustomed. 
And whereas the Prior and Monks at Bath, by a certain 
instrument under their common seal, have obliged them- 
selves and their successors solemnly to celebrate the obit 
of Sir Thomas Hungerford, Knight, my father, and that of 
the Lady Geva, my mother, as also the obit of Katherine, 

* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. ii. p. 189. 

' Knight of the Garter ; he was summoned to Parliament from 4 
to 96 Henry VI. and died August 9th, 1 449. 

* Daughter and coheir of Thomas Peverel. 



258 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my wife, on the 3d of December^ in the Cathedral Church 
at Bath, and to perform other W9rks of charity on the same 
day for all their souls respectively, I therefore bequeath 
unto the said Prior and Monks one whole suit of vest- 
ments, with all things appertaining thereto^for a Priest, Dea- 
con, and Snbdeacon, likewise a cope of black and red velvet, 
embroidered like waves, two copes of damask with gold of 
the same colour and work, to be used by the said Prior and 
Monks every year on the day of my obit, to the honour of 
God and in memory of me and my parents, and I desire 
that in the said vestments for greater notice my arms be 
wrought ; to Eleanor, Countess of Arundel ', now my wife, 
all my plate both of silver and gold, and likewise all the 
goods and chattels which were hers whilst she was unmar- 
ried ; to Sir Robert Hungerford, Knight, my son *, my best 
dorser of arras ; to the Lady Margaret, wife of my said 
son, my best Legend of the Lives of the Saints in French, 
and covered with red cloth; to Robert Hungerford Lord 
Molins ', my best pair of cuirasses, with all belonging 
thereto, to be chosen by him out of the armoury at Farley 
Hungerford; to my son Sir Edmund Hungerford, Knight S 
a cup of gold with a cover, and a sapphire on the head 
thereof; to Elizabeth, my daughter, wife of Sir Philip 
Courtney, Knight, a cup of gold ; to Margaret, my daugh- 
ter, wife of Sir Walter Rodenay, a bed of silk of black and 
green colour. And because my much honoured Lord, 

' Eleanor, daughter of Sir John Berkley, of Beverston, Knight ; 
she married, first, John, father of William 9th Earl of Arundel ; se- 
condly, Sir Richard Foynings, Knight ; and lastly, Walter Lord 
Hungerford. Vide her will in a subsequent page. 

' Who succeeded as Lord Hungerford, and was summoned to 
Parliament from 'iO to S3 Henry VI.; he married Margaret, 
daughter and heir of William Lord Botreaux. 

' His grandson, eldest son of the above-mentioned Sir Robert ; 
he married Eleanor, daughter and heiress of William Lord Molins, 
and was summoned to Parliament as Lord Molins from 23 to 31 
Henry VI. 

* Who married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Edward son 
and heir apparent of Hugh Lord Bumell, and by her left issue. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



259 



the Viscount Beanmont is lineally descended from the 
Dukes of Lancaster % I bequeath to him a cup of silver 
with a cover bordered with gold, and on it a knob of gold, 
with which cup the most noble Prince John Duke of Lancas- 
ter * was often served, and in which he did use to drink so 
long as he lived. For the advancement of Amulph and Wil- 
liam Hungerford, sons of the said Sir Robert Hungerford, 
Knight, my son, in their marriages, and also of Mary, 
daughter of the said Sir Robert, I bequeath to them dcc 
marks sterling *• 



^ The following table will explain the manner in which this John 
Viscount Beaumont was descended from the Royal House of Lan- 
caster : 



Henry Plantagenet, erandson of Kingsj^Maud^ daughter and heir- 
Henry HI. Earl of Lancaster, Der- ess of Sir Patrick Cha- 
by, and Leicester ; ob. 1345. I worth, Knt. 



Henry Plantagenet,= 
Duke of Lancas- 
ter, Earl of Derby, 
Lincoln, and Lei- 
cester, and Stew- 
ard of England, 
K. G. ; ob. 1360. 



Richard =p Eleanor =pJohn Lord 

Beaumont ; 



Earl of Tpianta- 
Arundelv4^6net. 
first hus- 
band. 



ob. 16 Edw. 
HL; second 
husband. 



Blanch Plantagenet,=John of Gaunt, E. G. 



daughter and ulti- 
mately sole heir of 
Henry Duke of 
Lancaster. 



son of Edward III. 
Duke of Lancaster. 



Henry Lord Beau- 
mont; ob. 43 Ed- 
ward III. =?= 



Henry I^. King 
of England.^^ 



John Lord Beaumont, E. 6. ; 
ob. 80 Richard 11= 



Henry Lord Beaumont ; ob. 1 Henry V.=== 

I 1 

John Viscoimt Beaumont, K. G. mentioned in the will of 
Walter Lord Hungerford; ob.SS Henry VL 

* John of Gaunt, father of Henry IV. It is evident from the 
above table that Viscount Beaumont was not descended from the 
*f Dukes " though he was so from the Earls of Lancaster. 

* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 205. 

s 2 



260 TESTAMRNTA VOTU9TA- 



NICHOLAS CAREW. 

To all Christian meoy Nicholas Carew \ the older Lord 
of BedyngtoD) greet! Dg, in God everlasting. Be it known to 
all men, that I, Nicholas Carew aforesaid, the Wednesday 
afore the Feast of Decollation of St. John the Baptist, 
the year of the reign of King Harry the Sixth after the 
Conquest the tenth % declare and notify by this present 
writing my will of all my manors, advowsons, warrens, 
chauntries, lands, and tenements, which I have other any 
man to mine use, wherefore I charge and pray mine execu- 
tors and feoffees to perform my will that ensueth touching 
these manors, advowsons, and porrons, chauntries, lands, 
and tenements, abovesaid. First, my will is, that Mary, 
my wife, have and enjoy all the manors, advowsons, lands^ 
&c. whereof there is a fine levied, after the effect of the said 
fine, peaceably, without interruption of me, mine heirs, and 
my feoffees; also, I will that the foresaid Mary have and 
enjoy to her, and to her heirs in fee for evermore to sell and 
dispose for her and me and our ancestors the manor of 
Per ... % with all the appurtenances in the shire of Mid- 
dlesex, and all the lands, 8cc. which be in the shires of 
Hampshire, Wiltshire, and London ; also I will that the 
foresaid Mary have and enjoy peaceably the manors of 
Norbury and Bedyngton, from the Feast of Michaelmas 

next coming, unto the same Feast of Michaelmas for 

- — ' — — — — ^ — ^^.^.^_^^__^_^^^^^__^_^^^_^_^^^^^_^^^— ^»^ 

* Hie descendant of an old and highly respectable family, which 
claimed tp be sprung from Otho de Windsor, the common ances- 
tor of the Earls of Plymouth and of the Fitzgeralds Earls of Ul- 
ster ; Nicholas de Carew, the ancestor of the testator, and of the 
numerous branches of that name (the descendant of one of which 
was by Charles I. created Earl of Totness) was summoned to Par- 
liament in 1300, but the writ never being repeated, the Barony 
created by it expired. Harl. MSS. 380, from which this will is 
taken, contains an extensive collection of abstracts of deeds, pe- 
digrees, &c. relating to the Carew family, of Bedington, and to 
those with which it was connected. 

• 28th August 1438. ' Query, Purle ? vide infra. 



TE8TABCENTA VETUSTA. S6l 

two years next saing, bearing to Nicholas, my son, yearly 
xl/. ; also my will is, I bequeath to the foresaid Mary all 
the money that I received for the sale of the manor of 
Grombregge, and also all my goods moveable not be- 
queathed ; also my will is, that my feoffees, after the two 
years aforesaid, enfeoffe my said son Nicholas the two 
parts of the manors of Norbury and Bedyngton, to him 
and the heirs male of his body coming ; and the third part 
of the said manors to the foresaid Mary, time of her life in 
name of dower; the remainder, after her decease, to the said 
Nicholas, my son, and to the heirs male of his body com- 
ing; and if the said Nicholas die without heirs male of his 
body coming, that then the foresaid manors of Norbury 
and Bedyngton; shall remaw to Nicholas Carew, Knight, 
to him and to his heirs of his body coming, if it so be that 
the said Nicholas Carew, Knight, do tail to himself and to 
his heirs of his body coming; the remainder to the foresaid 
Nicholas, my son, and to the heirs of his body coming, an 
hundred marks worth land yearly; and if it shall so happen 
that the said Nicholas Carew, Knight, die without heirs of 
his body coming, that then the foresaid manors of Bedyng- 
ton and Norbury shall remain to the aforesaid Nicholas, 
my son, and to the heirs of his body coming, and if he die 
without heirs of hb body coming, that then it shall remain 
to Mary and Johanne, daughters to Thomas Carew, my 
son, and to the heirs of their bodies coming; with remainder 
to Isabel, my daughter, and to the heirs of her body com- 
ing ; with remainder to Thomas Turbevyll, son to Robert 
Turbeville, Knight, and to the heirs of his body ; remainder 
to William Turbevyll, another son of the said Robert Tur- 
bevyll. Knight, and to the heirs of his body coming, and 
for default of issue the remainder to my right heirs : also 
my will is, I pray and charge my feoffees of the manors of 
Kersalton, Nutfield, Purle, Sulham, Lyde, Maythma% and 
my lands in Wodemysthern^ called Weston, after the de- 
cease of Mary my wife, that they grant these same manors 
to Nicholas my son and to the heirs of his body ; in default 
of such issue the remainder to Mary and Johanne^ daugh- 
ters to Thomas Carew^ my son, and to the heirs of their 



S62 TE8TAMENTA VfeTUBTA. 

bodies ; and if they die without issue, the remainder to Isa- 
be]| my daughter, and to the heirs of her body ; the re« 
mainder to Thomas Turbeyyll, son to Robert TurbeyyU, 
Knight, and to the heirs of his body ; failing such issue to 
William Turbeyyll aboyesaid, and to the heirs of his body 
coming ; and for default of issue the remainder to be sold 
by Mary, my wife, and by my feoffees ; also my will is, 
that Mary, my wife, have all the issues and profits of all 
the lands, 8ic. in the towns of Wodengshom, Banstede, 
and Chypstede, for to sustain and find Mary, the daughter 
of Thomas Carew, my son, unto the age of xy year, and 
after the xy year I will that my feoffees grant to Mary, the 
daughter of the said Thomas, the same lands and tenements 
to her and to her heirs of her body coming ; and for default 
of issue, the remainder to Johanne, sister of the said Mary ; 
remainder to Nicholas, my son, and to his heirs of his 
body ; remainder to Isabel, my daughter, and her heirs of 
her body; and for default of issue the remainder to be sold 
by my wife and my feoffees ; also my will is, that Mary, 
my wife, have all the issues and profit of the lands, &c. in 
the towns of Sandersted and Wirlingham, for to sustain 
and find Johanne, the other daughter of Thomas Carew, 
my son, unto the age of xt year, and that then I will that 
my feoffees grant to the aforesaid Johanne the same lands, 
&c. to her and th6 heirs of her body ; remainder to Mary, 
her sister, and her heirs ; remainder to Nicholas, my son, 
and his heirs ; remainder to Isabel, my daughter, and her 
issue ; and for default of issue the remainder to be sold by 
my wife and my feoffees. 

Also my will is, I pray and charge my executors that 
they grant to Isabel, my daughter, all the lands in the pa- 
rish of Wantynge, in Berkshire ; to Isabel, my daughter, 
for her life; with remainder to Johanna, daughters of Tho- 
mas Carew, my son, and her heir's; remainder to Mary, her 
sister and her heirs; remainder to Nicholas, my son, and 
his heirs ; remainder to Ann, daughter of the same Isabel, 
and to the heirs of her body ; remainder, in default of issue, 
to be sold by my wife and my feoffees ; also I will that my 
feoffees, after the decease of Mary, my wife, give and grant 



TE8TAMENTA VfiTUSTA. 36S 

lo Mary, daughter of Thomas Carew, my son, the manor 
of '' Stoke yn hoo/' and to her heirs ; remainder to Joan, her 
sister, Nicholas, my son, and Isabel, my daughter, and the 
heirs of their bodies respectively ; and for default of issue 
remainder to be sold by my wife and my feoffees; also my 
will is, that after the decease of Mary^ my wife, the manor 
of Bandon be tailed to the Baron of Carew, in the manner 
and form as the manor of Norbury, and Bedyngton shall 
be after the form aforesaid ; also my will is, and I charge 
Mary, my wife, and my feoffees that they sell the lands and 
tenements in Croydon called Pyrle Rent, and Costantynys* 
rent in fee, and that the money that cometh thereof that 
they dispose for me and mine ancestry in alms, by their 
discretion. 

Also my will is, and pray and charge my feoffees, that 
after my decease, in all baste possible, that they endow 
Mary, my wife, in the best wise and to the best intent of 
all those manors, lands, and tenements, whereof she has 
non-jointure, as my trust is in them. In witness of all 
this, to these present writing, which is my last will, I put 
hereto my seal the year and the day abovesaid *. 



* Copied from Harl. MSS. 380, f. 96, to which is added the fol- 
lowing note : ** This was transcribed out of an ancient writing 
in parchment, remaining in the possession of Sir Francis Carew, of 
Bedington, in the county of Surrey, Knight of the Bath, amongst 
his evidences belonging to that manor, and was compared with 
the original upon Thursday the 22d day of August 1644.'* This 
Will merits attention from the absence of those religious bequests 
and that solicitude relative to the disposition of the body, which are 
almost always to be found in the testamentary dispositions of that 
period. Not a word is said about his funeral, nor is there any other 
religious or charitable direction than the slight one towards the 
end : as the character of the testator has not been preserved, it is 
difficult to account for this omission on any other grounds than 
that he had previously made those arrangements which formed so 
important an object of the attention of his contemporaries. 



264 TS8TAMENTA VBTUfiTA* 



JAMES LORD SAY. 

James Fienes Lord Say \ April 12tb» 1449. My body to 
be buried in the Church of the Gray Friars, London. To 
that house c /• sterling to pray for my soul and for the souls 
of all the faithful deceased, on the day of my funeral. To 
my son Sir William Fienes, Knight, the manors of Mer» 
worth, Huntingfield, and Keneston, in the county of Kent^ 
to him and to the heirs of body ; but failing his issue, with 
remainder to my daughter Elizabeth, Emily, and Jane, and 
the heirs of their bodies. I will that four thousand masses 
be said for my soul within six weeks after my decease*. 



SIR JOHN NEVILL, KNT- 

In Dei nomine. Amen. The first day of December ye 
yere of our Lord mccccxlix, I, John Nevill, Knight, sonne 
and heire to Rauf, Erie of Westmerland % being in good 
hele and good minde, remembring ye uncertente of this 
warlde, and as it is due to evere creature to dispose and or- 
deyne for ye helth of his saule, as well when he is in good 
hele as when he is visited by the sone of God, this I or- 

' He was summoned to Parliament in the 25th, and was consti- 
tuted Treasurer of England the 27th Henry VI. but a reverse of 
fortune soon followed this elevation, and he was beheaded July 4th, 
1450. By his wife Emeline, daughter of .... Cromer, he left 
issue the above-mentioned Sir William, ancestor of the Barons Say 
^d Sele. 

* Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. ii. p. 245. 

* Son and heir of Ralph second Earl of Westmoreland, by Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Henry Lord Percy, the renowned Hotspur^ 
and widow of John Lord Clifford ; he died v. p. on the 20th March 
29 Henry VI. 1451, without issue. This will is given literally in the 
text, because it is believed that nothing but an abstract of it has 
ever been printed, and because it is not a little curious from its be- 
quests and orthography. 



TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 263 

deyne and make my testament. Firsts I bequeath my soule 
to God fadre almyghty, therewith to doe his blessed will^ 
and for my body to be buried in the Church of Hauten* 
price, within the quere in the midd's of the chauncell, and 
that I ly honestly, as is according for myn estat, by the ad- 
vise and discrec'on of them that I sail make myn executors ; 
also I bequeath to the same place whar my body shall rest 
for my cors p'sant ' a coursour cald Lywd NevilP; also I 
will that myn executors ordayne an honest and a kunning 
priest to sing for my soul a twelmonthe, and yat he have 
for his sallary x marc ; also I bequeath to the same place 
for to make of vestements a gowne of cloth of gold blew, a 
dowblei of ye same, a gowne of black velvet, and all my 
dowbletts of velvett; also I bequeath to the same place a 
standinge cup of silvr and gilt, callyd ye Kataryne, and 
tharof to make a chalys; also I bequeath to my wife Ann' 
all the rem*'aunt of my goods meuable and unmeuable, and 
sche to be myn executor of myn testament, and w'th the 
said goods to pay my debts well and trewly, as my servants' 
wages, yat they be behynde, as all myn other creditors, yat 
I be in no p'ill yrefore ^ ; also I bequeth my wife Anne, to 
helpe also towards the paiment of my seid detts c marca 
due to me by my lord her fadere of her manage, if sche can 
recure yt, and if sche cannot, yat that be no impediment to 
the paiementts of my said detts ; also I bequeth my said 
wife all the money that is due to me be my said Lord her 
fadir; also I bequeth all my ffurs to my wife Anne; also 
I will that my said wife have holly all the liflode' yat schew 
i3 indued inne, even like as I have it; also I will yat the 
servants yat I have freed by my Tres patentes, that they 
have it still like as their patentee make menc'on ; and I will 
that my said wife make Thomas Prowfrott, que' of x marc 



* Corpse present, a mortuary. 

* Id Dugdale's Abstract, voU i.p. 999, << Lidiard NeviU." 

, ' She was the daughter of John Duke of Exeter, and re-married 
Sir John Nevill, her first husband's imcle, and by him waa mother, 
of Ralph third Earl of Westmoreland. 

* Peril therefore. » Livelihood. 



266 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

yerely, terme of his life ty me ; bIso, as for my servants yat 
be not freed, I will that they be rewarded by discretion of 
my said wife. These I ordeyne to be myn execators ; first, 
my wife Anne principal], and then John Crakenthorp, Tho- 
mas Prowfrott, Sir Nicholas Marchell, my chapleyn, and 
they fulfil this wilL Proved SOth March 1451. 



WILLIAM BRUGES, GARTER KING OF ARMS. 

William Bruges, Garter Kyng of Armes, at London, 
Feb. £6, 1449 ^ My body to be brought and buryed in the 
Church of Saynt George within Staunford, there to be 
buried, in the myddes of the quere of the said chirch. 
To the whych said chirch Y bequeth a gret holy-water 
scoppe* of silver, with a staff benature*, the said benature 
and staff weyng xx nobles in plate and more. Item, to 
the said chirch I bequethe a peyre of censonrs of sylver, 
with a ship of sylver for frankincense, and i spone in the 
same ship, of sylver*. Item, I bequethe to the said chirch 
a little hand-bell of sylver, of the gretnesse of a sacryng- 
bell*. Item, I bequethe to the same chirch a little round 
cofyn of sylver, closed in syngyng bred, and not the hoste. 
Item, Y bequethe to the said chirch, for ther solempne feste 
dayes, to stande upon the high awter, ii grete basyne of 
sylver, and ii high candlesticks of sylver. Item, I be- 
quethe to the said chirch i coupe of sylver, in the whych 
is one litel box of yvory, to put in the blessid sacrament; 

and to hang over the high awter • • Item, 

Y bequethe to the said chirch one gret chalice, over-gilt, 
of the wight of cs. to serve for theyre solempne festes. 

» Query, 1449-50? 

* *^ Stoup is the ancient term for a vessel for holy water.*' 

* '^ Benoistier, Benitier, Fr. Benedictarium, a portable vessel for 
holy water. Or staff benature I take to be the sprinkling brush 
with a silver handle, called by the Romanists at this day asperges, 
borrowed from the old Roman aspergillum or sprinkler." 

« '' A ship for frankincense. In Catholic rituals it is now called 
navicula.*' « '< Mass-beU.*' 



d 



-p 



«>• 



TESTAMBNTA VETU9TA. 267 

Item, I bequetbe to the said chirch ane bole sate of 

yestmytes of russet velvet. One coope, chesible dia- 

^ cones S for decones; with the awbes and parures. And 

"Sb two case corporasses* of the same sute of vestmyntes. 

f^ Item, I bequethe to the said chirch an other hole sute of 

black velvet, i chesible diacones, for decones, or frees of 

white clothe of gold powdred with garters, and two casse 

5 corporasses. Item, Y bequethe and ordeyne that the gret 

u framd that Y have lying id the gret 

berne in my place at Kentishton to be sold to the 

most value, and the mony rising thereof to be bestowed 

upon the complesshyng and endyng of the seyd chirch of 

^ Stannford; that is to be understand, in coveryng with 

c^ !ede, glassy ng, and makyng of pleyn desques, and of a 

* pleyn rodelofte, and in puyng of the seyd chirch, nourt 
Pi * curiously, but pleynly ; and in paving of the hole chirch, 

* ^ body and quere, with broad Holand tyle. Item, I bequethe 
^ '^ to the seyd chirch of Seynt George, a solempnitie of airay 

^ g for the fest of Corpus Christi, oon partie wrought in the 

^ plate, of sylver, and over-gilt ; and that other in tymbre to 

^ ^ be born between the decon and subdeacon: the tymbre is 

GO o peynted, and over-gilt with fyne gold. And, for every 

'^ ^ sign of the passion, an aungel berynge the sign of the 

^ ^ crosse, and of the crowne of thorne; another aungel beryng 

m ^ the pillar and the scourges ; another aungel beyryng the 

^ spere and the sponges ; another aungel beyryng the rem- 

|S nant of the signs of the passion ; and, in the middle of the 

0) feretory e, a gret round blak corver; and one peynted with 

1^ gold and asure, and peynted with sterres of gold, in the 

g middel of that round blok, for a gret coupe of sylver, and 

4> overgilt, to stande on, upon a pynne of tre '. And, in the 



QQ 



tH 



o seyd couple, a litel box of silver, and over-gilt, to put in 

the sacrament. This gret coupe, and the litle together, 

00 first to be set upon the gret blok of tre, with a gret croun 

o ' "Dalmatics." 

.H * "A case for the corporas or consecrated host. Case coporasses, 

^ a kind of burse to preserve the corporal cloth on which the host is 

^ laid before and after consecration, and made square, with gussets 

'^ to open and shut." > " Pin and block of wood." 

o 



268 TBSTAMCNTA VETUSTA. 

of and over gilt| g^nished with stones clq>jd duUets; 
redde, blue^ grene, and yellowe, garnished wyth connter* 
fejt perles made of silver; the croon of the wight of c«w 
This croun fyrst to be set upon the gret round blok of tre, 
and thanne upon the pynne standyng in the seyd blok. 
The said coupe to be crouned withoote wyth a small 
croune, ordeyned redy therefore. Item, I bequethe to the 
seyd feretory e, a tabernacle wde y wrought of sylver and 
over-gilt, of the wight of one marc, or thereabouts, goyng 
wyth a byll to be set high upon the coupe. And above, 
upon the poynt of the seyd tabernacle, a litel cross of 
silver and over-gilt, goyng also by a vyce'. All this plate 
that longeth to the feste yf myn executours samyn tbat 
yt should be in more sure garde of the parishors of the 
chirch of onre Lady of Staunford, Y would yt shuld rest 
and abyde in the garde of hem ; and wythyn thdre tresour. 
And atte daye of the fest of Corpus Christi, bit to follow 
the sacrement of the seyd chirch of our Lady, y f it plese the 
paryshors of the seyd chirch of our Lady; onlesse that 
they wol have yt serve for both. Item, Y ordeyn and be- 
quethe that the ii chapelles of our Lady and Seynt 
George, wythyn the seyd chirch of Seynt George, be 
closid wyth ostrich boarde*, and dere storied, after such 
quantite as the closure of pleyn horde there now con- 
teineth. And to the seyd chappel of our Lady, Y be« 
qnethe n images of our Lady and Seynt George, beyng 
in paynted stone, and in my chapel at Kentishton. And 
to the same of our Lady of Staunford, Y bequethe my 
grete candlestykes of laton, that standen in my chapel at 
Kentishton. Item, I bequethe to the seyd chappel of 
Seynt George of Staunford, the ymage of the Trinite of 
stoon, standyng in my chapel at Kentishton, wyth the- 
braunche of laton, for in lights, accordyng thereto; yt to. 
be sett upon a foot of stone, higher than the heddes of the. 
ymages of our Lady and Seynt George. Item, I bequethe 
the seyd small candlestykkes standyng in my chapel at 
Kentishton, to the new chapel of our Lady now in makyng 



' " Screw.** • Wainscot. Kennet, Par. Antiq^ p. 575. 



TBSTAMENTA V£TUSTA. W9 

iQ the same town. And as for the seyd three y mages of 
stoon (that is to say, the images of the Trinite, oar Lady, 
and Seynt George), Y woyl have made, for eiche of theym, 
a gret cofyn of elmyn horde; the seyd ymages to be nayled 
in fast, stuffed with hey, and so carryed, at my coste, unt6 
Staunford, and set up in the seyd chirch of Seynt George* 
Item, the two less candlestyks to be set upon the awter of 
our Lady, in the seyd town of Staunford ; and there to 
serve brennyng from the begynnyng of the Gospel, unto 
the tyme that the prest have used, upon my cost, as my 
goods will' suffyce to continue yt . . • every taper of halfe 
a pound wight ; and every day a masse to be seyd of our 
Lady. Item, I ordeyn and wol that the two greter candel- 
9tyks, beyng in my seyd chappel at Staunford, serve in the 
chapel of our Lady of Staunford ; and that on stand upon 
the ground afore the ymage of Seynt George in the same 
chapel. And for eiche of these candelstykkes to be or- 
deyned a taper of waxe of i pound wight, and, so served, 
to be lighted atte dyvyne servyce at pryncipal fest days, 
and'al other solempne festes, as, at matyns, pry me, masse, 
and the yeven songs. Item, I bequethe and ordeyne to 
the seyd chirch of St. George of Staunford, a little 
coffre, standyng bounden wyth plate of yren, fill of vest^ 
ments ; except on vestment, y f y t be therein, and that ys of 
blak satyn ground, figured wyth rede velvet; the orfreyes 
wrought wyth the nedel with ymages, the which said vest- 
ment Y wol yt serve for our Lady-chapel in Staunford 
only. Item, I ordeyne and bequethe to the chapel of our 
Lady in Seynt Mary chirch at Sandewiche, an half long 
gown of purple velvett furred wyth martrons', of that to 
be made a chesible wyth the parures*, and wyth the furre 
to be bouzt and ordeyned the orfreyes, like to the orfreyes 
of the singel vestyment of blak satyn, lyned with red vel- 
vet. And yf the seyd furre of matrones wol not suffice to 
ordeyne the seyd orfreys, myn executors to put to such 
mony as they may have of myne, to the percomplishing of 
the seyd orfreyes; and so endid to be delyvered to the 
seyd chirch. Item, I bequethe to the seyd chappel of our 

^^^-««H^iH^iMa^^^i^^B^»MM^.^i^M^ta^W^M^^^M— ^^^iM^^^M^^H^^^ta^hi^BB««HB-.MI^^^.V-^^^^— ^-^*^-^^»«^^^^iiMH^li^.^_i^^.^^H^W^^aB^-^B^W*— ^^** 

* " Martens." ' Ornaments, Fr. 



270 TBSTAM£NTA VETUSTA. 

Lady in Seynt Mary cbirch of Sandwich, the chalice of 
sylver and over-gilt, that my wyf hath ; and myn executors 
to make for the same chalice ii small nets of sylver and 
over-gilt, of the price of xxs, and than my wyfe to send yt 
to the seyd chirch. The residue of all my gooddes, after 
my dettes payd^ Y geve and bequethe to Anneys, my wyf, 
principal executrice, Thomas H addon, hir broder, co-exe- 
cutor to her, and Master Clement Denston, clerk, overseer 
of the same my testament *. 



JOHN LORD SCROPE, OF UPSAL. 

John Scrope, Knight, Lord of Upsal*, 1st July, 29th 
Henry VL 1451. My body to be buried in a new tomb 
made for me and Lady Elizabeth % my wife, in the Chapel 

* Ashmole MSS. from the Register of Stafford, Archbishop of 
Canterbury, p. 187, but copied in this work, with the notes, from 
'< Illustrations of Ancient Times." 

* He was summoned to Parliament from 7th January, 4 Henry 
VI. 14S6, to 86th May, 33 Henry VL 1455, and on the 26th Febru- 
aryy in the loth year of that reign, 1432, was constituted Trea- 
surer of the King's Exchequer. Dugdale states, that he died No- 
vember 15th, 34 Henry VI. 1455, which is followed by Blore in his 
elaborate pedigree of this family in the History of Rutland. Se- 
ger, in his MS. Baronage, however, fixes his death on the 15th 
November, 37 Henry VI. 1438, but from Cottonian MSS. Claudius 
C.viii. it appears, that Thomas le Scrope was found son and heir 
of John Lord Scrope of Masham, 34 Henry VL which corroborates 
Dugdale*s account. 

* Segar calls this Elizabeth << daughter of Ralph Lord Grey- 
stock, by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Chaworth, Knight," 
and states, that she married, secondly, Sir Gilbert Talbot, Knight ; 
other genealogical MSS. of considerable estimation also assert 
that she was the daughter of Ralph Lord Greystock. Blore, how- 
ever, says, she was the daughter of Sir Thomas Chaworth, of Wi- 
verton, co. Notts, Knight, by Nicholai, daughter of Sir Reginald 
Braybrooke, and which agrees with Harl. MSS. 1093, ** Visitation 
of Derby,*' 1 569. The contradictory pedigrees of the descendants 



TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA. 91^1 

of St. Stephen, commonly called Scrope's Chapel, within 
the Cathedral Church of ^t. Peter at York ; I desire that at 
my funeral my corpse be carried by my sons and servants, 
being then at my house, to the said Chapel, twenty-four 
poor men clothed in white gowns and hoods, each of them 
having a new set of wooden beads, walking before it, and 
1 will that these poor men stand, sit, or kneel, in the aisle 
before the entrance to that Chapel, saying their prayers, as 
well at the dirige as at the mass, and that each of them re- 
ceive vid. for their pains; also I will that my corpse, thus 
brought into that Chapel, be laid upon that tomb, and co* 
vered with a black woollen cloth, having a large cross of 
white linen thereon ; also that two fair candlesticks of sil- 
ver gilt, with my arms upon tbem, which I have lately 
given to the high altar, be placed upon my tomb, each of 
them having a taper of four pounds weight of wax burning 
during the whole time of my exequies ; to the altar in the 
Chapel of St. Mary at York a jewel, with a bone of St. 
Margaret, and xl s. for ringing their bells at my funeral ; to 
Elizabeth, my wife, all the furniture in my mansion house 
at York. And I appoint her, with John my son and heir, 
Thomas my younger son, and Master William le Scrope 
my brother, my executors. 

CODICIL TO THE SAID WILL. 

Dated March 1 8th, 1453. To Alianore, my daughter, 
during my own life xxmarks, and after my decease xLmarks, 
to be paid out of my manor of Driffield ; to John, son and 
heir of Henry Lord Scrope, of Bolton, one great broach of 
gold, of two angels fashioned like a man's heart; and 
whereas John, my son, whom I appointed in my will to be 
one of my executors, has departed this life, I appoint in his 
stead Sir John Bermingham, Treasurer of York Minster, 

of this Lord Scrope wiU be noticed in notes to the other wills of 
the family, and it is only necessary to remark here that the clause 
in the codicil to his testament renders it nearly certain that it was 
his son Thomas who married the daughter >if Lord Greystock, and 
which Blore states to have been the case. 



272 TCSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

and Mr. John Marshall/ one of the residentiaries there^ 
whom I will be joined, to my other executors; also I will, 
that if before my death, Thomas, my son, marry the daugh- 
ter of the Lord Greystock, that then my exequies shall be 
performed in all points with as much solemnity as my tes- 
tament expresseth ; to Thomas, my said son, my parliament 
robe ; to Collin, my servant, x /. for his part, and Robert 
Cowrtby, my servant, v L for his part thereof*. 



THOMAS LORD HOO AND HASTINGS. 

I, Thomas Hoo, Knight, Lord of Hoo and Hastinge *, 
the 12th daye of February, the yere of King Henry the 
Sixt the 3Sd*, being in good mynde, make this my will and 
ordenaiince, after the forme that foloueth. Fyrst, Y will, 
tfiat myne feofys and myn excutors, ordeyn xx marks 
woiirth land of yerely valine, theye to yeve it in to mort- 
main to the Abbot and Convent of Batail, and to their 
successors, or to gevene them money as myne executors 
can agree w'h them, they to fynd two monkes syngging 
■ ■ ■ Ill ■ 1 1 1 ■ I 

* From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 660. 

^ He was created a Baron of the R^alm by the title of Lord 
Hoo and Hastings 86 Henry YI. and was elected a Knight of the 
Garter ; he was thrice married, first, to Elizabeth, daughter and 
heir of Sir Thomas Felton, Knight, by whom he had Thomas, who 
died V. p. without issue ; secondly, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of 
Sir Nicholas Whi^^hingham, Knt. by whom he had a daughter 
Anne, who married Sir Geofirey Boleyn, Lord Mayor of London, 
ancestor of Queen Anne Boleyn, mother of Queen Elizabeth ; and 
thirdly, Eleanor, whom he mentions in his will, daughter of Leo 
Lord Welles, and sister and heir to Richard Lord Welles, by whom 
he- had three daughters, Eleanor, wife of Sir James Carew, of 
Bedington, co. Surrey, Knight ; Jane, wife of Sir Roger Copley, 
Knight; and Elizabeth, who married Sir John Devenish, Knight. 
Dugdale says he could not ascertain the precise time of his death, 
but dying s. p. m. his manors became extinct. 

« 1455. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 273 

imp'petuite, at Saint Benignas altar in the said Abbey, for 
me and myn awncetours, and for suche personnes as myne 
executors wyle ordeyne. Item, I wyll that my feoffys of 
the reversion of the man'rs of Warteling, Bukstepe, and 
Brokesmayle, which my Lady Lewkenore, my mother-in- 
]awe> hath terme of her lyfFe, that my feofys make or do to 
be made, a sufficfent and a sure estate of parcell of thesayd 
manors, lands, and tenements, to the yerely value above all 
charges of xx li. to my brother Thomas Hoo, and to his 
eyres male of his body lawfully begotten, remaynder 
therof to my right heyres ; and yf it so be that myn eyres 
can agree, my said brother, with other landys to the value 
of XX li. yerely above all charges to hym and to his eyres 
male, that then the said xx £. wourth lande of the said ma* 
ners of Werthyng, Cukstede, and Brokesmayle, be to my 
right eyres; and also I wyll that the ouerpluce of the sayd 
maners of Werthyng, Cukstede, and Brokesmayle, after the 
decese of my Lady my mother, be kept 8ty]l in feoffys 
handes unto the tyme my debtes be payed^ and my wyll 
and ordenance be fully performed, and that thanne Dame 
Alianor, my wyfF, have hit terme of her lyffe, the remayn- 
der therof to my right eyres ; Item, I wyll, as for Hastinge 
Rape, that it be sold by my feoffys, and the money therof 
to be disposed by myn ex'ors to the marriage of my daugh- 
ters, and that my brother bye it afore any other man yf 
him lyft; Item, I wyll, that myn executours paye to my 
Lord Welles, my wyves father xiii^ markes, with that he 
make, or doo to be made, a sufficient and a sure astate of 
manners, landes, and tenements, to the yerely vallu of c 
marke avove all charges, to Aylenor, my wyflfe terme of her 
lyflF; and yf hit so be that the sayd Lord Welles will not 
make a sure and sufficient estate of the sayd maners, 
landes, and tenements, to the yerely value of c marks to the 
said Alianor, that then I wyll my brother Thomas Hoo sue 
a statute of the stapill > of ... • agaynst the said Lord 



' The Statute Staple was a security-for money, pursuant to the 
Statute 27 Edward III. c. 9, entered into before the Mayor of 
the Staple, the grand mart for the principal commodities or manu- 



274 TE8TAMBNTA VJSTUSTA. 

Welles, and that the said money therof commybg be dis- 
posed by my wyfFe and my sayd brother; Item, I will thai 
Anne, my daughter Alyanor ', and Elyzabeth \ have to 
their marriage a m marke, and that they be rulyd, go- 
uerned, and maryed by the discrecion of my wyfe and 
Thomas Hoo, my brother, and that the said m marke be 
divided betwixt my said daughters by the discrecion of my 
wyfFe and of my said brother ; Item, I will that Johane * 
have to her maryage, yf she be ruled by my executours, 
XX /t. and my wyffe to fynd her till she be maryed ; Item, I 
will that Bellamy Goodes and Margarete his wyff xl s. of 
annuite term of lyfF, out of the manor of Cokerno ; Item, I 
wyll that Hugh Flynt have xxs. of annuyte, term of his 
lyffe, out of the manor of Offley ; Item, I will that Richard 
Goodyenne have xx5. of annuite, term of his lyff, out of 
the manor of Mulberton ; Item, I will that Robert Ftanys 
have XX $. of annuite, terme of his lyff, out of the manor of 
Hoo; Item, I will that William Collyn have xx$. of an- 
nuite, terme of his lyffe, out of the maner of Offley ; Item, 
1 will that John Hardy have his fyndyng during his lyff by 
the discrecion of my wyffe; Item, I will that Jane, the 
norice*, be rewarded by my wife discrecion; Item, I will 
this John Fagnamil]y have . • . • In wytnesse wherof to 
this my present wyll indented, I have put to my scale of 
myn armes, wryttynthe dayeand yere above sayd. 



factures of the Kingdom, formerly held by Act of Parliament in 
certain trading towns, from whence the security is ci^led a Statute 
Staple ; both this and the Statute Merchant were securities for 
debts acknowledged to be due, and was originally permitted only 
among traders for the benefit of commerce ; whereby not only the 
body of the debtor may be imprisoned, and his goods seized in satis- 
faction of the debt, but also his lands may be delivered to the cre- 
ditor till, out of the rents and profits of them, the debt may be sa- 
tisfied, and during such time as the creditor so holds the lands he is 
tenant by Statute Merchant or Statute Staple. Blackstone*s Com- 
mentaries, book ii. chap. 10. 

' Apparently his daughters mentioned in the note to p. ^72. 

' Query, nurse ? 



TESTAMBNTA VETUStA. 275 



ROBERT LORD WILLOUGHBY OF ERESBY. 

^ Robert Willoughby, Knight, Lord of Eresby *, Juhe6tb, 
1452. My body to be baried in the Chapel of my College 
or Chauntry of the Blessed Virgin at Mittingham ; to Ele- 
anor Fitz-Hughy my cousib \ towards her marriage 

And I appoint John Viscount Beaumont ' and Ralph Lord 
Cromwell *, my executors. Proved 2d November 1468. 



SIR ROBERT WINGFIELD, KNT. 

Sir Robert Wingfield, Knight, at Cambridge, October 
6th, 31 Henry VL 1452. I bequeath my lands at Lete- 
ringham to Elizabeth, my wife, for term of her life, with 
remainder to my first sob John, to my second son Robert, 
to my third son Thomas, to my fourth son William, and to 
my fifth son Henry ; failing their issue with remainder to 
Elizabeth, Ann, and Katharine, my daughters, and their 
issue male. Proved November 21st, 1454. 

^ He was summoned to Parliament from 12 Henry IV. to 29 
Henry VI. was elected a Knight of the Garter temp. Henry V. and 
after distinguishing himself CiS a soldier in those reigns, died, ac- 
cording to Dugdale, on St. James's day, 25 July, 30 Henry VI. 
1452, without male issue. It is singular that his will was not proved 
until ten years after the date assigned for his demise. 

* Edmondson states, that William Lord Willoughby, the father 
of the testator, by his second wife Joan, daughter of the Earl of 
Kent, had a daughter, who married William Lord Fitz-Uugh, and 
it appears that by this marriage there was a daughter Eleanor, wh6 
married Lord Darcy. It was probably this Eleanor who is men- 
tioned in the above will, and which corroborates the statement. 

> K. 6. nephew of the testator, being the son of his sister Eliza- 
beth. 

< Uncle to Maud, the wife of the testator, and to whdm she was 
found cousin and coheir : she married, secondly. Sir Thomas Ne- 
vill ; and thirdly, Sir Gervase Clifton, Knight. 

T 2 



^6 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

RALPH LORD CROMWELL. 

Ralf Croinw.ell, Knight, Lord Cromwell*, 33 Henry 
VL 1454-5. My body to be baried in the middle of 

the qaire of the Collegiate Church of Tattershale, if the 
said Church shall be new built*. I will that immediately 
after my decease three thousand masses shall be said for 
my soul in the Counties of Lincoln, Nottingham, and 
Derby, of which one thousand to be of the Trinity, one 
thousand of the Blessed Virgin, and one thousand of Re- 
quiem. And I appoint the Reverend Father in God Wil- 
liam Bishop of Winchester'; Sir John Fortescue, Knight, 
Chief Justice of the King's Bench; John Portington, Jus- 
tice of the Common Pleas ; Sir Thomas Tirrell, Knight ; 
and John Talboys, senior, my executors. Proved February 
19th, 1455. 

SIR HENRY PLESSINGTON, KNT. • 

Henry Plessington, Knight, 1452. I bequeath to John 
Plessington^ my bastard, v marks. I will that my manor 
of Ukley, in the county of York, be sold at the discretion 
of William de Anderby. Proved 13th September, 1452 f. 



JOHN GODDARD. 

John Goddard, of Polton, near Marlborough. My body 
to be buried at Mildenhale. To my son, John, all my 
lands in Marlborough, and cxl/i. Thomas Fisher, and 
Cecily my daughter, his wife. Proved 12th April, 1454*. 

■ He was summoned to Parliament from the Ist to the 3Sd 
Henry VL in the 11th of which reign he was constituted lYeasuret 
of the King^s Exchequer. He died without issue January 4th, 
1455-6; his wife Margaret, daughter and heir of Lord Deincourt, 
died September 15th, 1453. Dugdale, vol. ii. pp. 45, 46. 

■ Dugdale's Abstract has it <<in the midst of the quire of that 
Collegiate Church of Tatshall until the whole fabrick should be new 
built ; and then to be removed into the midst of the quire.*' Ibid* 

> William de Wainflete, 1447—1486. 
* Ex inform. Geo. Baker, Esq. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 877 



WILLIAM GREEN, ESQ. 

William Green, of Heese, in the coanty of Middlesex, 
Esquire. My son John, and Elizabeth my daughter, wife 
of John Catesby. And I constitute my wife, Elizabeth, 
John Gainsford, Esquire, John Arderne, my son Robert, 
and John Catesby, Esquire, my executors. Proved 12th 
February, 1456*. 

ELEANOR COUNTESS OF ARUNDEL 

Eleanor Countess of Arundel and Lady Maltravers*, July 
20, 14.55. My body to be buried, with my late husband, 
John Earl of Arundel, in the Chapel of Our Lady within 
the Collegiate Church of the Holy Trinity at Arundel. To 
the Masters and Fellows of that College a cross of silver 
gilt, to remain therein perpetually for convenient uses. 
Also xl/. sterling, upon condition that the Masters and 
Fellows, with all the Priests and Officers of that College, 
and their successors, shall yearly keep the obits of John 
Earl of Arundel, my late husband, and my own obit, with 
mass and office of requiem, solemnly with note, at conve- 
nient hours, for their souls, and for the souls of our parents 
and ancestors, and of all the faithful deceased. Also, I 
ordain that my executors expend cc marks of my goods to 
found a perpetual chantry at the altar of our blessed Lady 
in the same chapel, for one priest to celebrate mass thereat 
for the health of my said husband's Boul, and my own soul, 
and that he have x marks per annum for so doing, or at 
least for twenty years next after my decease. To William 
Earl of Arundel, my son, my best cup of gold; likewise a 
ring with a ruby, and c/. sterling; to Joane Countess of 
Arundel, a cup of silver; to Lady Eleanor Percy, my 
daughter, a golden collar for her neck, with a jewel set 
with precious stones hanging thereat ; also a bason of sil- 
ver with the arms of the Lord Poynings, and of Sir John 

* Ex inform. Geo. Baker, Esquire. 
' See the pedigree in the next page. 



TBSTAUBNTA VBTUSTA. 

Mlii H. i 

1 ~ SSn 







TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 279 

Berkley^ Knight, my father, thereon ; likewise a ewer of 
silver, and c /. sterling ; to Lady Dudley, my sister, a row 
of pearls; to Lady Margaret, the wife of Lord Hunger- 
ford, a standing cup gilt ; to Sir Robert Hungerford, Knight, 
Lord Molins, now a prisoner in France, all the wool at my 
manor of Haytesbury, tp the yalue of one hundred pounds, 
towards bis ransom, provided that he be released from hi^ 
imprisonment during his life, and that neither he nor the 
Lord Hungerford, bis father, disturb the executors of this 
my testament; to Sir Morice Berkley, Knight, my brother, 
XX /. sterling; and to the Lady Lorai his wife, a cup of 
beryl garnished with gold ; to Maurice Berkley, son and 
heir of the said Maurice, my brother, a silver salt cellar 
Md X I sterling ; and to Ann, wife of the said Maurice, a 
book of mattins covered with velvet; to Thomas Berkley, 
son of the said Maurice, my brother, x/.; and to Edward 
Berkley, another of the sons of my said brother Maurice, 
X /. ; to William Gumey, and Agnes his wife. And I ap« 
point my son, William Earl of Arundel, my executor. 
Proved August 23, 1455*. 



SIR LEONARD HASTINGS. 

Leonard Hastings', at Derby, Oct. 8, 1455, wheras 
I have enfeoffed the right high and mighty Prince my gra- 
cious and special Lord Richard Duke of York, Henry 
Grey, John Sey vil, of Copley, John Persey, John Skar- 
burgh t, Esquires, and John Estowe, Clerk, now alive, 
and William Barowe, John Hastings, John Walter, and 
John Mayell, now dead, of and in the manors of Wystowe, 
Fleckney, and Newton Harcourt, with the appurtenances, 
in the shire of Leicester; and all other lands and tene- 

* From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol.i.p.39Sy anda MS. note of the will. 

' Father of William first Baron Hastings of Ashby-de-la-Zouche ; 
« he was/* says Dugdale, <' a servant in great esteem with Rich- 
ard Duke of York,** from whom he obtained a grant of the office of 
Chief Ranger of the Duke's Forest of Were on the SOth October, 20 
Henry VL and in which grant he calls him his " beloved Esquire." 



280 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

ments, 8cc. in the sbires of Leicester, Warwick, Northamp* 
ton, and York, as in this deed more plainly appeareth ; I, 
the aforesaid Leonard, in the most humble wise beseech 
my said Lord, and pray and require Henry Grey, John 
Seyvil, ficc. Sic. make an estate, anon after my decease, of 
the lands, 8cc. in Burton, in the county of Warwick, to 
my wife, Alys Hastings ", for term of her life ; the remainder 
thereof to my right heirs, 8cc. Also, to my son Richard, 
of the lands and tenements in Brantyngthorp and Ap- 
pulby, with the appurtenances, the advowson of the church 
of the same town of Brantyngthorp all only except, for 
term of life, the remainder thereof to my right heirs, See. 
Also, to my son Raufe, of the lands, 8ic. in Walde New* 
two, in the shire of York, for term of his life, the remainder 
thereof to my right heirs. Also, to my son Thomas, of 
the lands in LyteUAsheby, in the county of Leicester, and 
Drakenage, in the county of Warwick, for the term of his 
life *. 



SIR JOHN PELHAM, KNT. 

John Pelham% Knight, May 20, 1457,35th Henry VI. 
I will that my feofiees permit Joan, my wife, to enjoy my 
manor of Laughton, with the hundred of Sheplake, 
Note-Bourn, and Chilvington, with the profits of the ma- 
nors of Crowhurst, Burghershe, and Bevylham ; and that 
they enfeoff John Pelhaai, my son and heir, in the manors 
of Burghershe, with the hundred of Hawksbury, Crow- 
hurst, with the hundred of Bareslow, as also the forest and 
chase of Dalyngton ; and in default of issue male of the 
said John to remain to my son William; failing his issue, 
to Thomas my son, and his heirs male, with remainder to 
my right heirs. Also, I will that they enfeoff William, 
my son, in the manor of ^evilham, with the hundred of 
Shoosewell, with remainder, in default of his heirs male, to 

* HarLMSS. S881,p. 13. 

' Daughter of Lord Camoys.. It is singular that he does not 
mention William , his son and heir, in his will. 

* Ancestor of the Right Honourable the Earl of Chichester. 



T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 281 

John, xnj son and beir, and his heirs male; failing such, 
to Thomas, my son, and his heirs male, with remainder to 
my right heirs. Also» I will that after the death of Joan, 
my wife, my said feoffees enfeoff John, my son and heir, 
in my manor of Laughton and hundred of Shiplake, with 
remainder, in default of issue, to William and Thomas, 
my sons •• 

WILLIAM LORD ST. AMAND. 

William Beauchamp, Lord St. Amaiid', March 18, 
1457*. My body to be buried in the Chapel of the Chantry 
at Stepul Levynton, in the county of Wilts. TV> the Shrine 
at St. Osmund at Salisbury x marks f. 



ANN DUTCHESS OF EXETER. 

Ann Holland, Dutchess of Exeter*, April 20, 1457. 
My body to be buried in the Chapel of the Chancel of the 
Church of St. Katherine beside the Tower of London, 
where the corpse of my Lord and husband is buried ; and 
I forbid my executors to make any great feast, or to have 
a solemn hearse^ or any costly lights, or largess of liveries, 
according to the glory or vain pomp of the world, at my 
funeral, but only to the worship of God, after the discre- 
tion of Mr. John Pynchebeke, Doctor in Divinity^ one of 

* From the abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. viii. p. 1 IS. 

* Son of Walter Beauchamp, younger son of John Lord Beau- 
champ of Powyck ; having married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir 
of Gerard Braybroke, son of Sir Gerard Braybroke, by Alianore, 
daughter, and eventually sole heir of Almaric Lord St. Amand, 
he was summoned to Parliament as Lord St. Amand 27 Henry 
VI.; and shortly afterwards, being Server to the King, was appointed 
Chamberlain of North Wales; he died March 19th, 1457*8. 

* Query, 1457-8 ? t From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. i. p. 25^. 
' The widow and second wife of John Holland, K . G Duke of 

Exeter (vide his will, p. 255), and daughter of John Montague, 
Earl of Salisbury. 



^2 TB8TAMBNTA VSTUSTA. 

my executors. To the Master of St. Katberine'si if he lie 
present at the dirige aad mass on my burial day vi s, viii <2.) 
to every brother of that College being then present iii s. i v <2.; 
tp every Priest of the same College then present xxd.; to 
f^Yery Clerk then present xiid.; to every Choirester vid,; 
%Q every S^ter tb^ present xxd.\ to every Bede-man of 
the said place viiid. I will that my executors find an 
honest priest to say mass and pray for my soul, my Lord's 
soul, and all Christian souls, in the Chapel where my body 
be buried, for the space of seven years next after my de* 
c^a^^; and that for so doing be receive every ye^r xii 
marks, and daily to say placebo> dirige, and mass, when so 
diippsed* Proved M^y J 5, 1458*. 



EPMUND BRUDENELL, ESQ. 

Edmund Brudenell, of Agmondesham, senior. Esquire >, 
October 7, 1457, 36th Henry VI. My body to be buried 
in the Church of Agmondesham, near to Philippa my 
wife. To the Church of Lincoln^ for tithes forgotten, if 
any be forgotten, vi«. viii(2. ; to the making of a new bell 
in Agmondesham Church, besides lxvis. viiicf. given by 
Agnes Bonvalet, vi/. xiiu. iv(2.; to the Provosts of the 
Church, for the maintenance of the great light before the 
cross, xxs.i to the maintenance of the light before St. Ka^ 
therine's cross uis. ivd.; to be distributed among the poor 
of Agmondesham IV /.; to the reparation of the high way 
to Aylesbury and Wendover xl/. towards which I will 
that my gold cup, two silver basons, and my great piece 
of gilt plate with the cover, and three silver candlesticks, 
be sent to the Tower of London, to be melted down ; to 
Joan, my daughter^ towards her marriage, to be paid her 
at the age of fifteen years, cc marks ; but, if she die before 
that age, I will that the said sum be given towards the 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. pp. 81, 82. 

' Ancestor of the Right Honourable the Earl of Cardigan. 



TBSTAMBNTA VJETU8TA. 

repairs of the Xiag^a^ii^ -^imji to'»y ^ngbter Alice, my 
piocaeof lilver plate with the coTer chased with gold ; also, 
to my said daughter/ wife of Richard Waller, junior, Esq. 
of Kent, and to the heirs of their bodies, my manor of 
Woodmandelse, to be settled on him and her, when Richard 
Waller the elder settles on the said Richard Waller the 
younger, and the heirs of their bodies, lands of the yearly 
▼alue of xl/. with remainder, if the said Alice die without 
issue, of the manor of Woodmandelse to Henry Brudenell, 
my uncle, remainder to Peter Brudeaell, of Aynbo, re- 
mainder to my right heirs for ever ; to John, my son, my 
lands in Chalfhunt St. Peter's, Eqre, Deiiham^ and Ful* 
mere, when twenty years of age, in UAI, remainder to Henry 
Brudenell, my uncle, in tail, remainder to my own right 
heirs for ever. To Edmund, my son, when twenty years 
of age, my manors of Radno and Stoke, with remainder to 
Henry Bnidenell, my uncle, in tail^ remainder to Peter 
Brudenell, of Aynho, remainder to William Bulstrode, my 
brother', remainder to my right heirs; to Drue Brudenell*, 
my son, when twe^ity years of age, the manor of Huge]eyj 
with the advowson, and all my lands in Burnham, Dorney^ 
Farnharo, Taplow, Heckman, Agroondesham, Stoke-ManT 
devile, Stoke** Hailing, Kimbell and Edelf burgh, and the 
manor and rent of vii marks out of the manor of Doders- 
ball, with all my lands in Tring and Chesham, in the coun- 
ties of Hertford and Berks, in tail, remainder as in the lands 
given to Edmund, my son; to Sir Robert Bnidenell, my 
sun, all my lands in Horton and Stanwell, in tail general, 
as in the lands bequeathed to Drue, my son ; to Oxford, 
all my Bibles ; and I will that my other books be divided 
among my four sons as my executors shall think fit; to 
the poor at my burial xhs, and at my month's end iv/.; to 
Philippa, my wife, my manor of Hugeley, and all my 
——■——■— ^—— ' I ■ ■ — — — I f ■ I I I 11 II I ■■ ,11. 

* William Brudenell, fkther of the testator, married Agnes, 
daughter and heir of Robert Bulstrode, Esq. 

* Drue Brudenell, the son and heir of the testator, took out let- 
ters of administration to his will August 1st, 1469. Vide the will 
of the said Drue Brudenell in a subsequent page. 



S84 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

lands in Barnbamy Ashburnham, Domey, Taplow, Hesk* 
baniy and Farnham, for term of her life. And I appoint 
the said Pbilippa, my wife, John Cheney, Richard Bul- 
strode, and Robert Parsons, my executors *• 



JOAN LADY CLINTON. 

This is the will of me, Johane Clinton ', widow^ who was 
the widow of Thomas Clinton, Knight, made 12th January 
1457", 36 Henry VL I will that my body be buried in 
my new Church of the Hospital of West SmithBeld, 
London. I will that my feoffees which now be^ and 
hereafter shall be, of and in all manors, lands, &c. which 
late I had in the Counties of Leicester, Warwick, and 
Derby, hold and possess the said manors, 8cc. by three 
whole years next after my decease, and that the issues and 
profits thereof be received by my executors and not by my 
feoffees ; they for to content and pay all my debts. I will 
that my executors find continually, for the space of three 
years, one honest priest to sing divine service for my soul 
and for the souls of the aforesaid Thomas, late my hus- 
band, and of John Staunton, sometymes husband, and of 
Ralph Mignell, Knight, and Johan his wife, my father and 
mother ; to the Abbess and Convent of the House of Nuns, 
beside the Tower of London, xlv /. upon this condition, 
that they and their successors forever recommend my soul 
in their devout prayers, and also that they hold my anni- 
versary solemnly with placebo and dirige, with a mass of 
requiem by note yearly, by the space of ten years next af- 
ter my decease ; to the house of Calke, in Derbyshire xl 5.; 
to the house of Herteshorne'a cheseble, price xxvi s. viiiA; 
also I will that Isabel Fraunceys, my daughter's daughter, 
have XL marks to her marriage ; to Margaret, sister of the 

^■____^ . _ • — ■ — —^^ 

* From the abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol.ii. pp. 494, 495. 
' The testatrix so fully describes herself in her will that an 
account of her is unnecessary. ^ 1457-8. 



TE8TAMBNTA VETUSTA. 285 

said Isabel co marks, upon this condition^ that she be mar- 
ried to Robert Wele, the son of John Wele, Gentleman^ of 
Gloacestersbire, and if she be married to any other man, 
then I will that the said Margaret have but one hundred 
marks and no more, and if either the said Isabel or Marga- 
ret do die before they be married, then I will that Cecily, 
sister of the said Isabel and Margaret, have xxL of the 
said cc marks if she live to be married ; the residue of the 
said c marks I will shall be disposed in works of piety, after 
the discretion of mine executors, by the oversight of the 
right worshipful Lady my lady Dame Margaret Countess 
of Shrewsbury * ; also I will that Joan Mignell, my god- 
daughter and servant, have toward her finding xx s. during 
the nonage of Thomas Francyes * ; also I will that John 
Shirley', son of Margaret Shirley, my daughter, immedi* 
ately after my decease, enter into all the manors, lands, &c. 
in the county of Nottingham, which I hold in dower after 
the death of John Siaunton, sometime my husband ; and I 
will that my said feoffees, after the said three years next 
after my decease, make estate of the moiety of the said 
manors, 8cc. in -the counties of Warwick, Nottingham, and 
Derby, to the said John Shirley and the heirs of his body 
lawfully begotten, with remainder to the right heirs of me 
Dame Joban Clinton ; and the other moiety of the said 
manors I will be disposed of in charitable deeds and works 
of mercy, for the soul of me, till Thomas Franceyes, son of 
Adam Franceyes, come to the age of twenty-one years, and 
then that my feoffees make an estate of the said moiety to 
the said Thomas Franceyes and to the heirs of his body 
lawfully begotten, with remainder to the right heirs oP me 



> Apparently Margaret widow of John Talbot, first Earl of 
Shrewsbury. 

' From whom the present Sir Francis Burdett, Baronet, is de- 
scended. 

* Of Staunton Harold, co. Leicester, son and heir of Ralph 
Shirley, by Margaret, daughter and coheir of John Staunton^ of 
that place, and it appears by this will that the testatrix was her 
mother. 



286 TfiSTAMENTA VfitUStA. 

ihesftid Dame Johan Clinton ; or if the said Thomas die 
before the age of twenty-one years, yet I will that the said 
moiety abide still in the hands of my feoffees till he should 
have attained that age, and then I will that they make an 
estate to Isabel, Margaret, and Cecily, sisters of the said 
Thomas Francyes, to them and their heirs of their bodies 
lawfully begotten, upon this condition that the said Mar- 
garet, Isabel, and Cecily, shall pay unto Johan Francyes, 
their sister, Nun in the house of the . • » • near the Tower 
of London, III/, towards her sustenacion during her life, 
and also that they shall yearly pay iii /. unto Elizabeth 
Frauncyes, their sister, Nun in the house of Polesworthe, 
during her life. In witness whereof, to this my present and 
last will I have put to my seal*. 



REGINALD PETTE. 

Reginald atte Pette, of Stockbury, 12th January 1456. 
Item, I bequeath toward the making of a new beam in the 
Church of Stockbury xiii5. iiiiJ. ; towards a new bell 
called trebyll vi 5. viii J. ; towards the work of the new isle 
iu the aforesaid Church iv marcs; and towards the making 
of a new window there xx s. Witnesses, John Petytt, Nich. 
Cowstede, Adomar at Pette, Thomas atte Pette, Peter atte 
Pette, Christopher, Clerk of the Parish there. Vicar of 
Stockbury. 



RICHARD EARL OF SALISBURY. 

Richard Nevill, Earl of Salisbury', May 10, 1458. My 

body to be buried in the Priory of Bustelsham, in the 

■ - ■ ■ ■ 

* Harl. MSS. 4028, f. W5. 

' K. G. eldest son of Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, K.G. 
by his second wife Joane, daughter of John of Gaunt ; from marrying 
Alice, the daughter and heir of Thomas de Montacute, Earl of Sa- 



TBBTAMfiKTA VBTUSTA. S87 

county of Berks, which is under the piLtronage of m^ and 
my dear wife, in her right, among the noble Lords late 
Earls of. Salisbury, her ancestors, in the place which, with 
the advice of the Prior, 1 have fixed upon. I will that cc 
marks^ be expended by my executors for my tomb, and c 
marks on my funeral; also, that xl marks be dfstri- 
buted amongst poor maidens at their marriages ; and that 
c /. be spent in masses, alms, and other works of charity, 
for my soul. I ordain that, on the day of my funeral, 
there be offered two coursers, one of them completely har- 
nessed, with caparisons of my arms, and that there be ban- 
ners, standards, and other accoutrements, according as is 
usual for a person of my degree. I will that my feoffees 
stand seised of my castle and manors of Sheriff Hoton, 
East Lilling, West Lilling, and Raskelf^ to the use of my 
wife during her life. Also, I will that the covenants of 
marriage of Thomas, my son ', with Maud Lady Wil- 
lough by, his wife, be fully performed, according to the 
agreement made between me and Ralph Lord CromwelK 
Also, I will that the marriage covenants made for the mar- 
riage of Catherine, my daughter, with the son and heir 
apparent of William Lord Harrington, the son of William 
Lord Bonvile, be performed. My mother, Joan, late Coun«> 
tess of Westmoreland, and my father, Ralph, late Earl of 
Westmoreland. To my eldest son, Richard Earl of War- 
wick^; to my son George > twelve silver dishes, and a cup 



lisbury, K. G. he was created Earl of Salisbury, and was appointed 
Lord Great Chamberlain of England in 89 Henry VI. but was be- 
headed at York shortly afterwards. 

^ His third son, who married Maud, the niece and coheir of 
Ralph Lord Cromwell, and widow of Robert Lord Willoughby of 
Eresby ; he had no issue by her, and after his death she married to 
her third husband Sir Gervase Clifton. 

* Knight of the Garter ; he acquired the Earidom of Warwick 
by marrying Ann, sister and heir of Henry Duke of Warwick, and 
is celebrated in the History of England as the " King Maker,'* 
from his great influence and power. 

Afterwards summoned to Parliament as Lord Latimer. 



288 TEST AMENTA VETUSTA. 

with cover gilt ; to my daaghter Alice a gilt cup with cover ; 
to my daughter Eleanor a silver bowl with a cover; to my 
daughter Katherine a silver bowl with a cover; to my 
daughter Margaret u marks, to her marriage, and a gilt 
cup with a cover ; to my daughter ' the Countess of Arun- 
del a cup of gold ; to my brother. Lord William Faucon- 
berg*; to Alice, my wife. Countess of Salisbury. And I 
appoint Sir James Strangwayes, Knight, Robert Danby, 
Justice of the Common Pleas, Christopher Conyers, of 
Hornby, Esquire, John Wytham, John Ireland, and John 
Middleton, my executors *. 



MASTER ROBERT TOSTE- 

Master Robert Toste, Provost of the Collegiate Church 
of Wingham, 17th August, 1457. My body to be buried 
on the uppermost step, on the North part of the high altar, 
where the Gospel is read in the quire on holiday's in Wing- 
bam. I will that a marble stone be laid over me, with an 
inscription to induce people to pray for my soul. I be* 
queath^part of my books to the new College of All Souls, 
founded by Archbishop Chicheley, part to University Col- 
lege, and part to the University Library of Oxford. Proved 
l6th February, 1458, at Canterbury. 



MATILDA CLITTEROW, 



Matilda, relict of Roger Clitterow, of Ash, Esquire, 8th 



* Joan, wife of William Fitz-Alan, Harl of Arundel. 

* Which title he acquired by marrying Joan, daughter and heir 
of Thomas Lord Fauconberg ; he was created Earl of Kent 1st Ed- 
ward IV. and was also a Knight of the Garter. 

* From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 303, and a MS. note of this 
will. 



T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 289 

October, 1457* My body to be buried in the choir of the 
Parish Church of Ash aforesaid, with the body of my said 
husband. To John, son of John Norys, and Alianore his 
wife, the whole suit of armour of my late husband ; to the 
Lady Alice Septuans. Proved 4th Novemberi 1457) at 
Canterbury. 

JOHN YOUNGE. 

m 

John Younge, of Heme, 26th May, 1458* To the fa^ 
brick of the Church of Heme, viz. to make seats called 
puyinge x marks, so that the same be done within two 
years after my decease. Proved at Canterbury. 



ALANUS ENGEHAM. ' 

Alanus Engeham, l6th May, 1458. }/lj body to be 
buried in the Chancel of the Blessed Virgin Mary of the 
Church of All Saints of Wodechurch. Agnes, my wife, 
John Engeham, Esquire, and others, my feoffees. I be- 
queath to Robert, my son, all my land and tenements what- 
ever, in tail; remainder to John Engeham, my cousin. I 
bequeath to the parish of Wodechurch, if they will permit 
the Chancel of our Lady of Wodechurch to be made ten 
feet larger, after the form of St. Nicholas' Chancel, and 
will permit me to be buried therein, the residue of money 
arising from the sale of certain lands ; but if not, I desire 
that the said lands be not sold. I will that if the said John 
Engeham die without issue before the age of twenty-one, 
that my feoffees enfeofie William Engeham, in all the 
lands that were entailed by Moses Engeham, my grand- 
father. Proved at Canterbury. 



ANN BURGESS. 

Anne, widow of Thomas Burgess, Esquire, at Gravene, 
8th April, 1458. My body to be buried in the Chapel of 

u 



^QO TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

the Blessed Virgin Mary at Qravene. Robert, John* 
Richard, and Martyn^ my sons; Margaret Chambelyne, 
tny daughter; John Norwode, my kinsman; John Marty n, 
the son of John, my eldest son. Witnessed by Roger Pritke, 
Vicar of Gravene, John London, M^jor of Feversham, to 
be the last will of Anne, sometymes the wife of John 
Martyn, Justice, late the wife of Thomas Burgyss, Esquire. 
I will that my feoffees, immediately, after my decease, do 
make an estate of the lordships of Dergate, in the parish 
of Harnhill, with the several farms and lands therein named, 
and of a tenant named Andrews, within the parish of 
Boughton under Bleen, to John Martin, my son, in tail; 
remainder to his brothers Robert and Richard ; remainder 
to my own right heirs. I will that my feoffees do make an 
estate to Richard Martyn, my son, of Ewell Court, with its 
appurtenances, in the parishes of Faveraham and Gravene, 
in tail, remainder to his brothers Robert and John ; remain- 
der to my own right heirs, provided an annuity be first 
granted oat of the said lands of five marks yearly, to be 
paid to the said John Martyn in tail; remainder to his bro* 
ther Robert and to my own right heirs ; I will that the said 
feoffees make an estate to the said Richard my sod, of the 
manor of Sesaltery, in tail ; remainder to his brothers Ro- 
bert and John ; also I will that they make an estate of the 
manor of Gravene, with the three marshes of Blanenche, 
Nastlem'sh, and Stonebuck, to John, my eldest son, in tail; 
I will that the said feoffees bring a charge of iv/. viii s« x d, 
to the Prior of Giechurch, of a tenement called Fympes te- 
nement, with divers other lands and tenements, and that 
they make an estate to Robert Martyn, my son, of the ma* 
nor of Perywade, in tail; remainder to his brothers John and 
Richard ; remainder to my own right heirs for ever. Proved 
at Canterbury. 



EDVi^ARD ST. JOHN, ESQ. 

Edward St. John, Esq. 14th July 1458. My body to be 
buried in the Church of St, Peter and Sti Paul, in Charing. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 291 

I appoint my wife Isabella my residuary legatee, and my 
said wife and my son Thomas executors of this my will. And 
I constitute William Darell, Esq. the supervisor thei^of. 
Proved at Canterbury^ 



JOAN KNOWGHT- 

Joan Knowght, daughter and heir of Henry Knowght, 
dated at Taniford, 1st June 37 Henry VI. 1459. My body 
to be buried in the Church of the Friars Preachers of the 
City of Canterbury. My two sisters ; my grandsire and 
grandame ; I bequeath all my lands and tenements in Te- 
nyngton, after certain legacies, 8cc. be paid out of them to 
Lady Dame Elianor Brown, widow of Sir Thomas 
Brown, Knt. and to her children for ever ; I will that my 
cousin Richard Malmayn's feoffees, unto whom I am next 
heir, shall, after my decease, make an estate and a grant 
of the reversion of Plukle and Waldersher, after the decease 
of Alyce, now wife ^ to John Clifford^ to the said Lady 
Brown, and to her feoffees, in fee for ever, notwithstanding 
the feoffment made thereof by me, or of the v marks by me 
then possessed in hand. Witnesses, Richard Dryland, 
John Bertlott, Stephen Wade, Stephen Charles, Vicar of 
Tanyngton, 8cc. Proved at Canterbury. 



JOHN GRACE, CLERK. 

John Grace, Vicar of Kenyngton^ March 26th, 1460. 
Administration of his goods and chattels granted to John 
Betry, Rector of Estwell, and John Lane, Vicar of Kenyng* 
ton aforesaid. Proved at Canterbury. 



JOHN KEMPE. 

John Kempe» of St. Nicholas Romney, 26th March, 
1460. To the Fraternity of St. George in that Church ; my 

u 2 



292 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

kinsmian John Kempe, of Hope, sen.; my wife Alicia; my 
son William ; to the Chapel of St. George in the same 
Church ; to the Churches of St. Laurence and St. Martin ; 
Mr. John Grafton, Vicar of Romney. Proved at Canter- 
bury. 

RICHARD BERNE. 

Richard Berne, of Canterbury, 28th April, 1461. My 
body to be buried in the aisle before the cross, in the south 
part of St. Paul's, at Canterbury. To the rebuilding of the 
bell tower of the monastery of St. Augustine ix /. to be paid 
as soon as the said work shall be begun ; to the prisoners of 
the Castle of Canterbury and of Westgate vi s. viii cf.each; 
to the Prioress of the Church of St. Sepulchre, towards the 
works of her Church xi ji s. iv d. ; to the repair of the high- 
way leading towards Sandwich, by St. Martin's Hill and 
the Fishpoole x /. ; towards the repair of the highway in the 
Winecheape, between Bircholle's Place and St. James's 
Hospital x /. ; to Joan, my wife, my furniture and my best 
cart, and my five horses fit to draw it, with all their harness ; 
to the building of the new bell tower of Tenterden vis. 
yiud.; Richard my son. Proved 7th May 1461, at Can- 
terbury. 

JOHN SPROT, CLERK. 

John Sprot, Rector of the Church of Crundale, Decem- 
ber 4th, 146l. To be buried in. the Chancel of that 
Church. To each of my parishioners, as well men as wo- 
men XL J.; also to every one not married xiid. ; to John 
Rotley, once Vicar of Westgate, Canterbury xl s. Proved 
at Canterbury. 

JOHN ST. NICHOLAS. 

John Seynt Nycholas, of the parish of Ashe, 18th June, 
1462, 2d Edward IV. My body to be buried in the Chapel 
of St. Thomas the Martyr, in the Church of St. Nicholas 
of Ashe. I bequeath v marks, for the five years next after 



TESTilMENTA VETUSTA. 293 

« 

my decease^ to the works or the buildings of the said Cha- 
pel. My manor of Burye, in Essex. I bequeath to the 
Phapel of Overland xl5.; to each of my daughters, on 
dieir marriage, XL marks; Margaret, my wife; Thomas 
Seynt- Nicholas, my brother; to my ffeoffeea, Henry Au- 
ger, of Newenden, John Dyggys, of Berham, Esquire, and 
others, all my lands and tenements in Ashe and Wyng- 
ham, and in Essex ; and I will that, immediately after my 
decease, they enfeoffe Margaret^ my wife, in the same for 
her life. I will that Thomas, my son, after the decease of 
the said Margaret, shall have my said manor of Burye, in 
Essex, paying out of it to Robert, his brother, v marcs 
yearly, and to his heirs and assigns, as a free and perpetual 
rent-charge. I will that Richard, my son, have all my 
lands and tenements which I lately purchased of James 
Hope, in the parishes of Ashe and Wyngham aforesaid. 
To Roger, my son, my lands at Billerihaye. If the said 
Thomas die before he comes of age, then I will my manor 
of Burye to Richard his brother, and the said Richard's 
part as aforesaid then to Roger his brother, and that 
which was to Roger shall descend to Robert; and if all my 
sons die before they come of age, then I bequeath my said 
manor of Burye, and all my lands and tenements aforesaid, 
after the decease of my wife, to my daughters, share and 
sbare alike, and, if they die without heirs of their bodies 
lawfully begotten, then I bequeath the jsame to my bro 
ther Thomas aforesaid, in like manner; remainder to my 
feoffees, for charitable uses. Proved at Canterbury. 



MARGARET DUTCHESS OF EXETER. 

Margaret Dutchess of Exeter*. My body to be buried 
in the Chapel of the College of St. Kathcurine beside the 
Tower of London. And I appoint Sir Thomas Tirrell, Knt. 
my executor, and my nephew the Earl of Warwick * super- 
visor of this my will. Proved May 15th, 1458. 

' Widow of Thomas Beaufort, K.G. Duke of Exeter, and 
daughter of Sir Thomas Nevill, of Hornby, Knt. 

* Richard Nevill, K.G. was Earl of Warwick from 1449 to 
1478, but he certainly was not her nepheuo. 



294 TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 



THOMAS KNYVET, ESQ. 

Thomas KDyvet, Esquire, October 4tb, 1458. My body 
to be buried in the Chancel of the Church of AH Sainu at 
Staneweye, between my wives. To John Knyvet, my son 
and heir ; my manors of Grotene, in SufToIk, Dunhall and 
Staneweye, in Essex, and Ramsdenhelehouse, with the ad- 
vowson of the Church ; to my daujghter Margaret, wife of 
Robert Baynard. And I constitute my sons Nicholas and 
Robert, and John Wright, my executors. Proved 21st 
July 1459. 

ROBERT LORD HUNGERFORD. 

Robert Lord Hungerford *, April 22d, 1459. My body to 
be buried before the altar of St. Osmund, Bishop and Con* 
fessor, in the Cathedral Church of Salisbury. To the Ca- 
nons Resident, Vicars, Choristers, Chantry Priests, and 
other officers belonging to that Cathedral, to celebrate my 
exequies and to perform all other divine solemnities on the 
day of my funeral, the sum of xl. to be distributed amongst 
them in the usual manner ; to a thousand priests saying the 
exequies for the dead^ commendations, the seven peneten- 
tial Psalms, with the wonted Litanies, to each of them xud. ; 
to the Chantry Priests celebrating divine service in the 
Chapel which my father founded in that Cathedral, to each 
of them, to pray for my soul, xLs.; to Sir Robert Hunger- 
ford, Knight, called Lord Molins *, my son and heir, two 
basons of silver gilt ; to my brother, Sir Edmund Hunger- 
ford, Knight, two flaggons of silver gilt, with my arms 

' Second Baron Hungerford ; he was summoned to Parliament 
from S9 to 33 Henry VI. inclusive, and died on the 14 th of May 
1459» leaving Margaret his wife, daughter and sole heir of William 
Baron Botreaux surviving. See her will in a subsequent page. 

* His eldest son, who having married Alianore, daughter and heir 
of William Lord Molines, was summoned to Parliament as Lord 
Molines from 23 to 31 Henry YL and was beheaded and attainted 
in 1463. 



TE8TAMENTA VETU8TA. 995 

thereon ; to the Lady Margaret Rodney, my sister^ an 
image of our Lady in silver gilt, with my arms under the 
foot thereof; to the repair of the high-way called the 
Causeway in Stawyk Marsh, which Walter Lord Hunger- 
ford, my father, Brst caused to be made^ for the health of 
the soul of the Lady Katherine, his wife ', xxv marks ; to 
Thomas Hungerford *, son and heir of Robert Hungerford, 
Lord Molyns, a bed of white velvet embroidered, upon 
condition that at his death he leave the said bed to his 
next heir male ; to Arnold Hungerford, another of my sons, 
c marks ; to Mary, my daughter, c marks *• 



HUMPHREY DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM. 

Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham % at Marstoke 
Castle, l6th August, 38th Henry VL* 1460. I will that my 
funeral be solemnized without any sumptuous costs or 
charges^ and that on the day of my obit and funeral cc 
marks in money be distributed to poor people to pray for 
my soul, over and above all other expenses that day, in 
meat, drinking, clothing of my servants, and clothing and 
reward to poor men holding of tapers. I will that the 
Canons of Marstoke before my decease have c /• in money 

> Katherine Peverell, first wife of Walter Lord Hungerford, 
K. G. and mother of the testator. 

■ This Thomas^ by reason of his father's attainder, never suc- 
ceeded to bis father's honours, and was himself attainted. Mary^ 
his 'daughter and heir, married Edward Hastings, afterwards se- 
cond Baron Hastings of Ashby-de-Ia-Zouche, who obtained the 
reversal of the attainders of his father and grandfather in 1485, and 
was summoned to Parliament as Lord Hungerford. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 207. 

s Knight of the Garter; he was killed at the battle of North- 
ampton July loth, 1460. 

* Dugdale justly observes, that this date must be erroneous, be- 
cause the Duke was killed in July 1460. The MS. note of this 
Will, from which part of this abstract is taken, does not mention 
the date. 



296 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

to purchase lands to the valne of cs. per aQDaaiy which, if 
it be done in my life, I desire that they augment that Con- 
vent therewith with one Canon more for ever, so that 
thenceforth there may be fourteen, the Prior being ac- 
counted as one; of which number I will that one shall 
sing daily, and pray for my soul, and for the souls of all 
my ancestors ; as also for the souls of my wife and chil- 
dren, at the altar in the North aisle of the said Conventual 
Church of Marstoke. Also, I will that my College of 
Plecy^ in Essex, which was founded by Thomas of Wood- 
stock, late Duke of Gloucester, my grandfather ^ be aug- 
mented with three priests perpetually, and six* poor men, 
to pray for my soul, and for the souls of my ancestors, my 
wife, and children ; and that there be purchased, and law- 
fully amortized to the said College by my executors, in 
case it be not done in my life time, for the augmentation 
and sustenance of the Master and Brethren of the said 
College, and of the said three priests and poor men, lands 
and tenements to the yearly value of c marks; whereof I 
desire that every of the said seven poor men receive every 
week xud. for his sustenance, and to find himself, except 
housing, which I will be provided by my executors build- 
ing there. Also, I will that the Chapel be built on the 
North side of the Church of the said College, to be hal- 
lowed in the worship of the Trinity and our Lady. Also, 
that there be founded and said in the said Chapel, after it 
be so made and hallowed, a mass of our Lady, whereunto 
the said seven poor men to come daily, except they be pre- 
vented by sickness, to pray for the souls aforesaid. My 
manors of Talgartha, in Wales^ and Burstwicke, in the 
county of Holdemesse. To my son Henry ' cccc marks, 
"— ^■•^■■■^— ^^■^■'"■i"'"^""'"""-™— ^•■™^— ■™™"""— — ^■^— ■■^— ~— ^~'^~^— ■— "™— ^^^~^~^— ■— ~ 

' Edmund Earl of Stafford, K. G. his father, married Ann, 
daughter of Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, and 
youngest son of Edward III. 

• Query, seven ? Vide infra. 

' Sir Henry Stafford, his third son, who married Margaret, wi- 
dow of the Earl of Richmond and mother of Henry VII. See 
their Wilis in subsequent pages. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 297 

to him an4 to my daughter Margaret, Countess of Rich- 
mondy his wife. And I constitute my wife my principal 
executrix, and my brother of Canterbury * my executor *. 
Proved 2d December, 1460. 



SIR THOMAS TUDENHAM, KNT. 

Thomas Tudenham, of the Diocese of Norwich, Knight, 
February £2, 1461 V To Sir John Wenlock, Knight and 
Baron', one quarter part of the Barony of Bedford ; also. 



* Thomas Bourchier, his half-brother, viz. son of his mother by 
her second husband, the Earl of Ewe, was Archbishop of Canter- 
bury from 1454 to 1490. 

* Dugdale^s Abstract, vol. i. p. 167> and a MS. note of the will. 

* Query, 1461-2? 

3 This John Lord Wenlock was created a Baron in 1461, and 
was elected a Knight of the Garter in the reign of Henry VI. 
during which he acquired such great wealth as to be able to lend 
his sovereign the sum of ^.1,033. 6s, 8d. for which he received an 
assignment of the fifteenth and tenth granted by Parliament in the 
year 1456. He was killed at the battle of Tewksbury 1471, '* leav- 
ing," says Dugdale, vol ii. p. 264, " neither wife nor issue that ever 
I could see ;'* but from the will of Lady Say, in a subsequent 
page, it appears that he married Anne, who it is presumed was the 
daughter of ■ Danvers, and who successively married Sir John 
Fray and Sir John Say, Knights. Leland asserts, that '< the Lord 
Wennelock left an heire general that was maried to a kinnesman 
of Thomas Scotte, otherwise caullid Rotheram, Bishop of York. 
He had with her yn manage Luton in Bedfordshire, and three 
hunderith markes of landes thereaboute, and a faire place within 
the paroche of Luton caullyd Somerys, the which house was sump- 
tuously begon by the Lord Wennelok, but not finisched.'* In the 
Beauties of England and Wales, vol. i. p. 31, we are informed, 'Hhat 
on the north side of the choir of die Church of Luton, in the 
county of Bedford, is a vestry room used as a school, and an ele^ 
gant Chapel founded by John Lord Wenlock, as appears by the 
following lines, from a manuscript (Biblioth. Harl. No 1531, the 



298 TESTAMENTA VSTUSTA. 

my manors of Oxburge, Sbyngham, and Sparbam, in the 
county of Norfolk, for the term of his life; and I will that 
the said Lord Wenlock sell my manors of Wangford and 
Elveden, in the county of Suffolk. Proved Oct. 23, 1461. 



LADY CONYERS 

I, Dame Maud, wife of Sir Robert Conyersi Knight, with 
his consent make my Will, March 28, 1460* I will that 
all the manors which I have by inheritance, and gift uf 
John Fitz Raufe, my father, after the death of Sir Robert, 
my husband, shall remain to John Conyers, my son, and 
to his heirs. To my son, John Conyers, two hundred 
wether sheep, and the hangings of worsted at Skelton Hall. 
I will that a priest be found for ten years to pray for my 
soul. My manors of Skelton and Tolyngton. Hroved dOth 
June, 1467. 

JOANE BRUYN. 

Joane Bmyn, wife bf Richard Brayn, of Estlingham, 
CO. Kent, Esquire, June 14, 1468. My manors and lands 
in Essex, Kent, and London, to my husband, Richard 
Bruyn, for the term of his life. And I appoint William 
Gaynsford, Esquire, supervisor of this my Will. Proved 
17th October, 1463. 

Herald*s Visitation of Bedfordshire, anno 1566) in the Britirii Mu« 
seum: 

Jesu Christ, most of myght^ 

Have mercy on John le Wenlok, Knight, 

And of his W3rffe Elizabeth, 

Woh out of this- world is passed by death ; 

Woh founded this chapel here. 

Helpe them with yr hartey prayer ; 

That they may come to that place 

Where ever is joy and solace. 

From his wife being called Elizabeth in these lines it is probable 
that AnUf mentioned above, was his second wife. 



TE8TAMENTA VBTUSTA. 299 

RICHARD RICHE. 

Richard Riche, Citizen and Mercer of London', 8d 
April, 1463. Mj body to be buried in our Lady's Cbapel 
in the Church of St. Lawrence in the Old Jewry, London. 
J order that Katherine, my wife, Thomas, my son, and 
Robert Leve^ my Chaplain, also William Marowe^John 
Walden, and Thomas Urswicke, my daughters' husbands, 
shall be dressed on the day of my funeral in black cloth, 
and that all the children of my said daughters, and one 
servant of the said William Marowe, John Walden, Tho- 
mas Urswick, and all my servants in London, shall be 
dressed in black cloth ; and that Thomas Urswick shall 
have XL 5. for the buying the same for himself, his wife, 
and all his children. My lands in Hoddesdon, Broxbonrne, 
Stansted, and Henwell, in Herts, and in Hoxton, in the 
parish of Shoreditch, in Middlesex. Whereas I have, by 
deed dated 1440, founded five almshouses in Broxboume, 
I will that Isabel^ wife of John Rich, my late son, have for 
life certain lands in Hoddesdon, called .the George. And 
I bequeath all my lands and tenements in Isdlden and 
Redeclyffe% to my son Thomas. Proved l6th Aug. 1464. 



SIR GEOFFREY BULLEN, KNT. 
Geofiiiey Bulleh*, Citizen, Mercer, and Alderman of 



* Whose great grandson Richard Riche was created a Baron in 
1 Edward VI. and was ancestor of the Earls of Warwick and Hoi* 
land of that name. Dugdale states, that he was an opulent mercer 
of London, and was Sheriff of that City in 1441> that he died in 
1469, and that this inscription is engraved on his tomb : 

'' Respice quod opus est presentis temporis aevum ; 
Omne quod est, nihil est, pneter amare Deum/* 
Butashis will was proved in 1464, he must have died five years before. 

* Islington and Ratcltffe. 

> Grandfather of Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire, K. G. and 
of Ann, second wife of Henry VIII. the mother of Queen Eliza- 
beth. This Sir Geoffrey Boleyn was Lord Mayor of Loudon in 
1457, and married Anne, eldest daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Lord Hoo and Hastings, K. G. 



t 






y . 



dOO TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

LoDdoD, June 14, 1463. My body to be buried in the 
Chapel of St. John, in the Church of St. Laurence in the 
Jury, London ; otherwise in the Church of Blykling, in the 
Chapel of St. Thomas, if I die in Norfolk, To William, 
my son, now within age; to Thomas Bullen, my son; to 
Isabel, Ann, and Alice, my daughters, my lands in the pa- 
rishes of Blykling, Holtham, Stukey, Mulburton, Kemsing, 
and Sele; to Dame Ann Hoo, my cousin, a nun at Berking. 
And I appoint Thomas Boleyn, my brother, my executor. 
Proved July 2d, 1463. 



WILLIAM HAUTE, ESQ. 

William Haute, Esquire, gth May, 146£. My body to 
be buried in the Church of the Augustine Friars of the 
city of Canterbury, before the image of St. Katherine, be- 
tween my wives. Item, I bequeath towards the works of 
the Church of Bourne, of the stalls and other reparations 
there, iv marks. Item, to the prisoners of the Castle of 
Canterbury vis. viii<2.; to the prisoners of Westgate vis. 
yind. William Haute, my son; Richard, Edward, and 
James, my sons; Anne, Joane, Elizabeth, Margaret, my 
daughters; Alice, married to Sir John Fogge, Knt. ; Joane, 
wife of my son William ; William, son of my son William; 
John Godewyn, Prior of St. Augustine's, Canterbury. I 
bequeath one piece of that stone on which the Archangel 
Gabriel descended, when he saluted the Blessed Virgin 
Mary, to the image of the Blessed Virgin Mary of the 
Church of Bourne, the same to stand under the foot of the 
said image. I bequeath one piece of the bone of St. Bar- 
tholomew to the Church of Waltham; one piece of the 
hair cloth of St. Catherine the Virgin; and a piece of the 
bone of St. Nicholas to the Church of the Augustine Friars 
aforesaid. I bequeath all the remainder of my relicks to 
my son William for life, with remainder to the Augustine 
Friars for ever. 1 bequeath all the rest of my goods and 
chattels to my son William for ever. Proved 4th October, 
1462, at Canterbury. 



TESTAMENTA VjETUSTA. SOl 



HUMPHREY EARL OF DEVON. 

Humphrey Stafford, Knight ^, Sd September 3 Edward 
IV. 1463. My body to be buried in the Church of our 
Lady at Glastonbury. I will that Mr. Nicholas Goss and 
Mr. Watts, Warden of the Grey Friars, at Exeter, shall, 
for the salvation of my soul, go to every parish Church in 
the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Vi^ilts, Devon, and Corn- 
wall,. and say a sermon in every Church, town, or other; 
and as I cannot recompense such as I have offended, I de- 
sire them to forgive my poor soul, that it be not endan- 
gered ♦. 

MARGARET BLUET. 

Margaret Bluet, of Grantham, co. Lincoln, 1464. My 
body to be buried at Herlaxton, near my husband John 
Bluet. My son John ; my husband's brother Thomas 
Bluet f- my sister Katherine Bandesf. 



JOHN PIGOT. 

John Pigot, of Abington, 1464. My son Thomas, who 
married Margaret, and had a daughter Margaret; my son 
VV^illiam f. 



KATHERINE LADY FITZWARINE. 

I, Katherine *, wife of the noble and most potent Lord 
William Bourgchier, Lord Fitzwarine, at the manor of 



' Afterwards Earl of Devon ; he was beheaded at Bridgewater 
17th August 19 Edward IV. 

* From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 173. 

t Ex inform. George Baker, Esq. 

^ She was the widow of — Stukeley, and was second wife to 
William Lord Fitzwarine, with whose permission she made her will, 
and died 86th March 1467. 



S09 TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA* 

Bamptone, Febraary IStb, 1466 >. My body to be buried 
in the parish Church of West Wohryngton. To my daugh- 
ter Elizabeth a girdle of red tissue ; to Ann Bourgcbier, 
Isabella Bourgchier, and Thomazine Bonrgchier. And I 
I appoint Lnrd Fitzwarioe my executor *• Proved 1st Sep* 
tember 1467. 



HENRY LORD VESCY. 

Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy % May 26th 6 Edward IV. 
1466. My body to be buried in the Church of White 
Friars, London, of which, and of all that Order in England, 
I am the principal founder. I will that my lorclships and 
advowsons in the county of York, which are 1>y deed en- 
tailed, viz. Lonesborgh, Brompton, Aton, Malton, Wel- 
lome, Sutton, Wyesthorpe, Wykham, Bromflete, and Bar* 
delby , remain to Margaret, my daughter, and the heirs of 
her body ; also I will that my lordships of North Cave, 
Clyff, and Clyff-Wighton, Burneby, Fangfosse, EUerker, 
Brantingham, Farflete, Weton, Esthorp, Lonesburgh, 
Holme, Brompton, and Gatesforth, in the said County, 
shall be sold by my executors, and likewise I desire my ex- 
ecutors to sell my lordship of Wy mington, in the county of 
Bedford, and all my other lands in the counties of Bedford 
and Bucks, with a tenement in Kingston-upon-HuU, toge- 
ther with all my lands and messuages in London^ Sussex, 
and Northampton, and the money received for the same 1 
will may be disposed of for the weal of my soul, in chaun- 
tries and other works of charity, viz. to find six priests 
perpetually to sing for my soul, and for the souls of my fa- 

> Query, 1466-7 ? 

* Dugdale's Abstract, vol. il. p. 131, and a MS. note« 

* He was summoned to Parliament 24th January 1449, 27 • 
Henry VI. by a special writ, with limitation of that honour to the 
heirs male of his body, being the first and only instance of the 
kind, and died January 16th 8 Edward IV. 1468, s. p. m. when his 
honors became extinct. Margaret, his daughter and heir, was first 
the wife of John Lord Clifford, but before her father's death, at 
which time she was twenty-six years of age, she had re-married 
Sir Lancelot Threlkeld, Knight, and left issue by both husbands. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, 303 

ther and mother, in such place as I have before determined*. 
Proved 30th January 1468 \ 



William lord zouche. 

William Zouche Lord Zouche and St. Maur% January 
12th 7 Edward IV. 1466. My body to be buried in the 
Church at All HallowUi at Haringworth f. 



HENRY PARIS. 

Henry Paris. My body to be buried at Hildersham, in 
the county of Cambridge. My manors of Linton and Hil- 
dersham ; my father Henry and mother Margaret ; Agnes 
my wife; my sons Robert, Edward, and William; my 
daughters Emma, Margaret^ and Agnes. Proved 1466 $, 



SIR HUMPHREY BOHUN, KNT. 

Humphrey Bohun, Knight*, November Sd, 1468. My 
body to be buried in the Chapel of the Abbey of our Lady 
of Coggeshall, if I die in Essex, but if I depart this life in 
Sussex, then I will that I be buried in the Chapel of our 
Lady in the Priory of Esbome, near the burial place of my 
parents. To John Bohun, my son, and his heirs, my 
sword and a bed in the chamber of Fillol Hall ; to Hum- 
phrey, my son, my manor of Fillol Hall, and my lands in 
the townships and parishes of Midhnrst, Esbome, Fam* 
house, Wollavington, Wolbedinge, Hysehut, and Midla- 
vent. Proved November 12th, 1468. 



* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 395, and a MS. note of this 
will. > Query, 1468-9 ? * He died 8th Jan. 8 Edw. IV. 1469. 

t From Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 69. 

X Ex inform. Geo. Baker, Esq. 

' OfMidherst* Dugdale, vol. i. p. 187, says, that this Hum- 
phrey was ag^d 14 in the 11 Henry VI. 



304 TESTAMENTA VBTUSTA. 

WILLIAM EARL OF PEMBROKE. 

William Herbert, KDigbt, Lord Pembroke ', July 27th, 9 
Edward IV. 1469- In Dornine Jesu. Item, I to be buried 
in the Priory of Bergavenny undre charge ; bytwene my 
fader's toumbe and the chancel], and the cost that should 
have be at Tynterne to be sett upon the chancell, as my 
confessor, See. shall say; and you my wife and brother 
Thomas Herbert, 8lc. And wyfe, that ye remember your 
promise to me, to take the ordre of wydowhood, as ye may 
be the better mayster of your owne, to perfurme my wylle, 
and to helpe my children, as I love and trust you,&c. And 
that c tonne of ***** be geven to make the cloyster of Tyn- 
terne, &c. and XX /. to the Grey Freres where my body shall 
lyght, and that my body be sent for home in alle haste se- 
cretely by Mr. Leisone and certain freres with him, &c. To 
Dr. Leisone x marks a yere to sing for mysoule during his 
life, &c. Item, to two prestes to be found to syng afore the 
Trinitie at Lanteliowe, for my soule, and for all there soules 
slayn in the felde for two yere, &c. Item, that my almes- 
house have as much livelode as shall suffice to finde six 
poure men and one to serve them. Wife pray for me, and 
take the said ordre that ye promised me as ye had in my 
lyfe, my hert and love ^ God have mercy upon me, and 
save you and our children, and our Lady, and all the Saints 
in Hevyn helpe me to salvation. Amen. With my hand 
the 27th day of July, William Pembroke. 

* Knight of the Garter. He was created Earl of Pembroke 8 
Edward IV, and in July 1469> being sent by the King to oppose 
a rebellion, was defeated and taken prisoner at the -battle of 
Dane's Moor, near Edgecote, in Northamptonshire, and by com- 
mand of George Duke of Clarence, and Richard Earl of Warwick, 
was beheaded at Northampton shortly afterwards, in anticipation 
of which he made his Will. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. S57* Though consi- 
dered a Will, it was evidently merely addressed as a letter to his wife. 

^ His wife, of whom he thus so affectionately speaks, was Ann, 
daughter of Sir Walter Devereux, Knight, and sister of Walter 
Lord Ferrers of Chartley. She appears to have fulfilled her pro- 
mise, for there is no account of her having married again. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 305 



ANOTHEB WILL OF THE SAID WILLIAM EABL OF 

PEMBROKE. 

July l6tb, 1468 >. I will that Maud^ my daughter, be 
wedded to the Lord Henry of Richmond^; Ann to Lord 
Powys'; and Jane* to Edmund Malafant ; to Cecilyi Ka- 
therine, and Mary, my daughters, mmd marks*. 



ROGER TWYSDEN, ESQ. 

Roger Twysden^ Dated at Chart, Slst August, 4th 
Edward IV. 1464. My body to be buried in the Church 

* This Will is dated a few days before the battle in which he 
was taken prisoner ; but in a MS. note of a Will of this Earl, in 
which the date is not mentioned, he gives precisely the same di- 
rections about his funeral as is contained in the preceding testa* 
menty but with the following addition: <'My brother Morgan; 
and I will that Edmund Malafaunt wed one of my daughters." 
The Will abstracted in the MS. alluded to is said to have been 
proved on the 30th of August 1468. 

* Apparently Henry, afterwards Henry VH. She married, 
however, Henry Earl of Northumberland. 

s Which marriage took place. 

* The account of the issue of the testator given in this abstract 
differs most materially from that given by Dugdale, and which is 
followed by Collins, for he states that the six were named, Cecily, 
who married Lord Greystock ; Maud, who married Henry Earl 
of Northumberland ; Katherine, the wife of George Earl of Kent i 
Ann, of the Lord Powys ; Isabel^ of Sir Thomas Cokesey, Knight ; 
and Margaret, who first married Thomas Viscount L'Isle, and af- 
terwards Sir Henry Bodringham. It is thus evident, either that 
one of the statements must be incorrect, or that instead of six the 
Earl had eight daughters. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. S5S. 

^ Apparently Roger Twisden, ancestor of the Baronets of that 
name, who is stated to have been aged fifty in the 18th Henry VI. 
and must consequently have been nearly 76 at the date of his Will. 



306 TE8TAMENTA VETU8TA. 

of Great Chart, without the door of the Chancel of the 
Sacred Trinity, on the West side, near the tomb of Alice, 
my late wife. To Thomas, my son and heir, and his heirs 
for ever, all my lands and tenements in Great Chart and 
elsewhere, in the county of Kent, after provision be made 
for Agnes ', my wife, mother of the said Thomas, for her 
life. I will that certain lands be sold to pay Margaret, 
my daughter, xx /. ; and that a marble stone be bought for 
my tomb in the Church of Great Chart. 



JOHN BAKER. 

John Ba,ker, of Folkstone \ on the Wednesday > next before 
the Feast of St. Michael, 1464. Alicia, my wife. I will 
that, immediately after my decease, my executors, out of 
my goods and chattels, shall place my aforesaid wife in 
the House or Hospital of St. Bartholomew, Sandwich; and 
I will that all my lands and tenements, within the ville and 
liberty of Folkstone (except three roods of land at Dulling- 
burgh, and my lands at Merefeld, which I bequeath to my 
second sister, Granriger), be sold, and with the money 
arising therefrom that my said executors make a new work 
called an Isle «, with a window in it, with the advice of 
the parishioners, which said work shall be built between 
the Vestry there and the great window, and to be built of 
stone, with lead, glass, and wood, as is seemly and meet 
for such a work. 

' Query, Ami, daughter and coheir of John Baker, of Coldham, 
near Folkestone, in Kent ? 

* Apparently of the family from which Sir Richard Baker, the 
celebrated Chronicler, was descended. 

> 26th September. « Aisle. 



TBSTAMBNTA, VETUSTA. 307 



JOHN BISHOP. 

John Bishop^ of the ville of Lenham^ janior, dated on 
the Feast of St. Bartholomew*, 1465. To John, my son, my 
silver seal; to my son William; Alice, my wife; John« 
my father. I bequeath all my lands and tenements in 
Lenham^ and held of the manor of Esseheden, lately pur- 
chased of William Bolle> to my wife, Alice, and her heirs 
and assigns for ever. I bequeath my 'messuage in the ville of 
Lenham, with its appurtenances, to John and William, 
my sons, their heirs and assigns for ever ; to Margaret and 
Cecelia, my daughters. 



JAMES BOURNE. 

James Bourne, of Doddington, dated 30th September, 
1467, 7th Edward IV. My body to be burled in the 
Church-yard of Doddington. To Joan, my wife, for life, 
the manor of Sharstede, with its appurtenances, and all 
other my manors, lands, and tenements, woods, rents, 8cc. 
and all other pertaining thereto of my inheritance, de- 
scended to me after the decease of Bartholomew Bourne, 
my father, in the parishes of Doddington, Lynsted, Kings- 
down, Newenham, and Weychelyng. I bequeath the re- 
mainder of the said manor of Sharstede, and all my manors, 
lands, 8cc. in the parishes aforesaid, to James, my eldest 
son by Joan, and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten,, 
and, for lack of such issue, to his brother John, in like 
manner; remainder, in like manner, to Mildred, Joan, 
Thomasine, and Isabel, my daughters, by Joan, my wife, 
and to their heirs for evermore. Also, I will that the said 
James and John shall yearly receive and take, when they 
come to age, equally between them, the yearly profits of 
the manors of Hygham and Northyngton, with the profits 

^ August 24th. 

x2 



308 T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 

of the manors of Sesaltre, with their appurteimnces^ during 
the life of the said Joan their mother, and after the decease 
of the said Joan, to go to the said John her son, and the 
heirs of his body ; remainder to the said Mildred, Joan, 
Thomasine, and Isabel, and to their heirs for ever; also I 
will that Edmeston, with its appurtenances, shall be sold 
after my decease, and in case my daughters, or any of them, 
arrive to the age of marriage, to be appropriated for their 
marriage portion ; and if all my said daughters should die 
before marriage, then I bequeath the same to James and 
John, my sons, for ever. 



WILLIAM NORTON, ESQ, 

William Norton, of Feversham, Esquire, 5th April 1468. 
My body to be buried in the Church of the Blessed Mary 
of Feversham. Elizabeth my wife, Reginald and Richard 
my sons ; Katherine and Anne my daughters. I will that 
my wife have the messuage, wherein I dwell in Fever- 
sham, so long as she remain unmarried ; remainder to my 
sons Reginald and Richard ; I will that Katharine, wife of 
my son Reginald, have my lands and tenements called 
Godfreys and Danyells, for her life ; to Reginald, my son, 
my principal tenement called Lese Court, and all other my 
estates in Kent, excepting the manors of Warden and Rip- 
pills, in tail general ; with remainder to my son Richard in 
like manner ; remainder to my daughters Katherine and ' 
Anne, and their heirs for ever; I bequeath lands and tene- 
ments called Godfreys and Danyells aforesaid, after the 
death. of the said Katharine, to Reginald, my sou, in the 
same manner as the lands aforesaid are given to him t to 
Richard, my son, my manors of Warden and Rippills, in 
tail general ; remainder in like manner to Reginald, my 
son ; remainder to my daughters as aforesaid. 



TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. ^ 309 



JOHN BAKER. 

John Baker *y of Lyffleton, in Lenham, let March 1469* 
Isabelta, my wife. I bequeath to Symon, my son, my te- 
nements at Lyffleton aforesaid, with the land and its appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging; I bequeath all my lands 
and tenements in Freustede to John and Lawrence, my 
sons, and the ^irs of their bodies, each to be the other's 
heir ; Michael, my son ; Elizabeth and Joan, my daughters. 



OLIVER DUDLEY. 

Oliver de Dudley % son of the most noble Lord Sir John 
Dudley, Knight, 22d July, 1469- I appoint Katherine, my 
wife, and Mr. William Dudley, my brother, my executors. 
Proved 2gth November 1469* 



JANE LADY NEVILL. 

Jftne, widow of Sir Henry Nevil, Knight ^^ 1470. My 
soni Lord Latimer and Thomas Nevill; my father Sir John 

Boiirchier, Knight, Lord Bemers; Margery my mother; 

"'■^ ■ ■ ' ■ . ___«.^_^_««___—— ————_______ 

> Probably ancestor of Sir Richard Baker, the Chronicler. 

* It would appear that this Oliver was the son of John Baron 
Dudley, K.G. and who was living in 1482 ; hut Dugdale only men- 
tions three sons of this Sir John; viz. Edmund, who died v. p.; 
John, ancestor of the Earls of Warwick and Leicester ; and Wil* 
liam Bishop of Durham. Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 216. 

s She was the daughter of John Bourgchler, Lord Bemers, ^d 
married Sir Henry Nevill, Knight (son and heir apparent of 
George Lord Latimer), who was slain at the battle of Edgcote, 
vita patris, 9th Edward IV. Richard Nevill, his eldest son, suc- 
ceeded his grandfather in the Barony of Latimer, in the same year, 
and died in 1&30. 



310 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my brothers Thomas and Sir Humphrey Bourchier ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of Sir Robert Welles, my sister*. 



ELIZABETH LADY WELLES. 

Elizabeth Lady Welles*, October 2d, 10 Edward IV. 1470. 
My body to be buried in the Church of the Friars at Don- 
caster, where the body of my lord and husband is interred. 
And I appoint Margery Lady Bemers, my mother, and Sir 
Humphrey Bourchier, Knight, the executors of this my will. 



MARGARET LADY HUNGERFORD. 

f 

Margarete Lady Hungerford and Botreaux', dated 
Aug. 8, 1476. To all cristen men to whom this p'sent 
writyng, trip'tite indented, shall come. Margarete Lady 
Hungerford and Botreaux, gtetyng in our Lorde. Where 
I by severall dedys have enfeoffed dyvers p'sonys of and in 
all my maners, castellls, hundredis, landis, and ten'tis, 
rentis, rev'sions, andservyces, with appurten'nces, in the* 
shires of Cornewall, Devonshire, Somerset, Wilteshire, and 
Bristow, of grete trdste, and to p'forme my will, as well of 
those that came to me by inheritance after the deth ofWil- 



* Ex inform. George Baker, Esq. 

' She was the widow of Robert Lord Welles, and daughter of 
John Bourchier, Lord Bemers, and sister of Jane Lady Nevill, 
whose will precedes this. 

* Vide Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 11 — 12. 

> She was the daughter, and eventually sole heir, of William 
Lord Botreaux, and one of the coheirs of the Barony of Moels, 
and married Robert second Baron Hungerford, whose wOl is in* 
serted in a preceding page, and died 17 Edward IV. 

* In the MS. at Heytesbury the letters th are generally spelt 
with a y — as yat for that. Hoare's Wilts. 



T£8TAMENTA VETIJSTA. 31 1 

liame Lorde Botreaax, my fader, whose soale God assoille, 
as of the maners of Heytesbury, Tudrington^ Hornynge- 
sham, Fenny-SattoDy and Codford-Petre, with th'appur- 
tenances, in the saide shire of Wilteshire, wich were 
grauDted to my Lord my husband and to me, by his feoffees, 
at his request and ordynaunce ; to have to us and to our 
heires and assignes for evermore. I, the foresaide Mar- 
garete, now make and declare my wille in maner and 
forme folluying. Firste, I wull that my saide feoffees, 
after that I am passed owte of this p'sente Jiff, stand fuUe 
alway, and be seased of all the maners, castellis, hundredis^ 
landis, and tenementis, rentis, reversions, and servyces 
aforesaide, by the space of x yere next aftar my deth. 
But I wull that Sir Roger Tocotes, Knyght, Maister 
Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, 
Robard Baynard, John Touke, and John Mervyn, and 
none other^of my feoffees, nor none other p'sone ne p'sones, 
have, talce^ and resceyue, during the, saide terme of x yere, 
th'issues, profites, and reuepous of all the p'mysses ; and 
they alone to have the hoole rule thereof, and the saide 
feoffees suffre theyme so to do withoute interupcion, in all 
thyngis touching my saide lyvelode. And if it fortune 
that the said Thomas Tropenell and John Mervyn dye, or 
be visited with such sikenes that they may not labour for 
th'execucion of this my wille, as my speciall trust is they 
shull do, afore th'ende of the saide terme of x yere,^than I 
wull that Maister William Ive, Maister John Sekden, Harry 
Long, and Robard South, with the saide Sir Roger Tocote, 
Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Robard Bay- 
nard, and John Touke, have, take, and rescey ve all th'is- 
sues^ profites, and revenous of all the saide maners and 
other p'misses ; and to do ail maner of thyngis with theyme 
as the saide Thomas Tropenell and John Mervyn shulde 
have do if they had be on liff. And if it fortune lui of the 
saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John 
Mompesson, Robard Baynard, John Touke, Maister 
William Ive, Maister John Sekden, Harry Long, and Ro- 
bard South, dye, or be vicited with such sikenes that they 
may not labour for th'execucion of this my will afore 



S12 TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

tli'nde of the saideterme of x year; than I wull that 

John Cly vedoD, Joha Haaipdoa, and Thomas South, with 
such 111 I p'sonys as shall fortune to overlyveof the said Sir 
Roger Tocotesy Maister Thomas ilaukins, John Mompes- 
son, Robdrd Baynard, John Touke^ Maister William Ive, 
Maister John Sekden, Harry Long, and Robard South, 
haye, take, and resseyve all th'issues, profites, and reve- 
nous of all the saide maners and other p'mysses ; and to 
do all maner of thyngis with theyme as the iiii p'sones 
aforetime shulde have do if they had be on lifT. With 
wiche issues and profites as bifore is saide by theyme to be 
rescey ved by the saide terme of x yere, I wull that the saide 
Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mom- 
pesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, 
and John Mervyn, and they that shalbe so named and taken 
as is bifore saide, discharge and save harmeles every p'sone 
that at my request, or at the request of my lord my hus- 
bond, whose soule God assoille, stande bounde or charged 
to eny p'sone for the fynaunce of Robard late Lorde Hun- 
gerforde, and Molyns our sone, late taken prysoner in 
Gyen ', and pay all the dettis of my lord my husbond, as well 
dew by especialte as withoute especialte. And in like ma- 
ner and forme thei pay all my dettis. And also, that they, 
with the saide issues and profites, execute and pTorme my 
saide lorde is last wille, wiche is conteyued in a cedull to 
this my wille annexed ; and also my laste wille that is con- 
teyned in my testament. The wich I hoope my saide 
frendis wull se p'formed. And so I requyre and charge 
theyme to do,*as thei wull aunswere at the gretc day of juge- 
ment bifore the Moste High Juge. And that the saide Sir 
Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompes- 
son, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, 
and John Mervyn, and they that shalbe so named and taken 
as is aforesaide, and specially tho that shall resceyve the 
monay take of th'issues and profites of the saide maners 
and other p'misses for their costis as long as thei shalbe 
goyng, rydyng, or occupied aboute the p'formyng of this 



> Guienne, vide note to p. 258. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. SIS 

my p'sente wille. And therof, and of the takying of tli'is- 
sues and revenous of all the saide maners and other p'misses 
oonys yerely to accompte bifore the Dean of the Cathedrall 
Church of our Lady of Salisbury, the Chaunterand Chaun- 
celer of the same Church for the tyme beyng, and oon of the 
worshipfulst Chanons, and of most discrecion, of the same 
Church, such oone as the said Chaunter and Chaunceler 
wille name, and John Neyirburgh tVelder, Esquyer, or ii of 
theyme. Always provided, that oone of the saide Chaunter 
and Chaunceler be atte the saide accomptes, if they be on 
liiFand in contray. Praying all my lordis feoffees, cosyns, 
frendys, and serv'ntes to be supportyng, helpyng, comfort- 
yng, and assistyng the saide Sir Roger Tocotes^ Maister 
Thomas Haukins, John'Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, 
Robard Baynard, John Touke> and John Mervyn, and 
theyme that shalbe so named and taken as is aforesaid to ex- 
ecute and p'forme this my p'sent wille ; and also my laste 
wille that is conteyned in my testament. And over this I 
wulle that if the said Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas 
Haukins, John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard 
Baynard, JohnTouke, and John Mervyn, or they that shalbe 
so named and taken as is aforesaide after my deth, be 
letted to execute this my p'sent will, or eny article therof, 
or be letted of the takyng of th'issues, profites, and ravenous 
aforesaide, by myne heire, or for eny other for hym by his 
comm'ndement, or by eny other p'sone havyng the rule and 
ward of myn heire beyng w'in age, or by eny other for the 
saide gardene by his com'aundement ; that then the saide 
Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mom- 
pesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, 
and John Mervyn, and they that shalbe so named and taken, 
as is bifore sayde, retayne the saide maners and other 
p'misses over the saide terme of x yere, unto the tyme they 
have levyed of th'issues and profites therof, as moch as they 
shall loste by the saide lettyng and interupcion,. and their 
costagis ; and if they may not atteyne, to have their remedy 
by that meane, than I wulle that they selle the saide ma- 
ners and other p'misses ; and that the saide feoffees make, 
or do to be made, such astate of theyme to such p'sonys 



314 TBSTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

as tbey shalde be flolde unto, as by the saide Sir Roger To- 
cotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Tho^ 
mas Tropenell, Robard Bayoard, John Touke, and John 
Mervyn, and they that sbalbe so named and taken as is 
aforesaide requyred. And that the saide Sir Roger To* 
cotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Tho- 
mas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, and John 
Mervyn, and they that shalbe so named and taken as is 
aforesaide, oonly take and resceyve the monay to be paide 
for the same ; and the same monay dispose by their dis- 
cressions for the soule of my lorde my husbond, my lord 
•my fader, my lady my moder, and all shuch other of myne 
Bttneestris as the saide lande came fro. And also I wnlle 
that if eny p'sone or p'sones that by the ordynaunce of this 
my laste wUle, shalde after my decesse have eny of the 
saide maners or other p'mysses aforesaide, be requyred by 
eny p'sone or p'sonys to whom my saide lorde my husbond 
or I, or eny of us bothe, or my feoffees at my desire, have 
made any astate in fee-symple, fee-taille, terme of lyff, or 
terme of yeris, of eny maners, landys, and tenementis that 
at eny tyme came to my saide lord my husbond, and to me, 
by the deth of my lord my fader, whose soule God assoille, 
or were geve to me by the feoffees of my lord my husbond, 
to relece into their possession, or conferme there astate with 
a clause of warrante to barre theyme and their heires 
ftgenste the Abbot of Westmynstre and his successours, 
according to their astatis. And if the said p'sone or ptsonys, 

• do not so 

after such requeste so made^ within vi monthis then next 

foluyng, so that tho p'sonys so requyring pay the necessary 
costis to be done and hadde for the same ; that then I wull 
that the saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, 
John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, 
John Touke, and John Mervyn, or theyme that shalbe so 
named and taken as is aforesaide^ stande fuUe seased of all 
such landis and tenementis, so by this my last wille or- 
deyned to eny such p'sone or p'sones sorefusyng; and th' 



* This and the interlineation in p. 319 are in the original. 



T£STAMBNTA VETUSTA. 315 

inoes sad ptafites thcrof take and recey ve unto the. tyme 
that such p'sone or p'sones so refusing wolbe agreable so to 
do; and the monay th^^of to be disposed as is aforeaaide. 
And if the snide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Hau- 
kins, John Mompesson^ Thomas Tropenell^ Robard Bay- 
nard, John Touke, and John Mervyn, and they that shalbe 
so named and taken as is biforesaide, be putte owte of pos- 
session, and kept owte with myght, so that they may not 
take the profites therof ; than I wuU that my saide feoffees 
make none astate to hym or theyme so refusing of eny 
parte of the saide maners, landis, and tenementis, and other 
p'mysses, but that then the landis and tenementis with that 
they so refusyng shulde have hadde by this my wille, be 
solde by the saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas 
Haukins, John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard 
Baynard, John Touke, and John Mervyn, or theyme that 
shalbe named and taken in the forme aforesaide ; the monay 
therof comyng to be disposed as is aforesaide. And also, I 
wuU that duryng the said terme of x yere, or durying the 
terme that my saide feoffees shulde by this my laste wille 
stande seased of all the saide maners, landis, and tene- 
mentis, and other p'misses, vi of my saide feoffees fortune 
to decesse, than my saide feoffees so bverlyving, at such 
tyme as shalbe thought to the saide Sir Roger Tocotes> 
Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Thomas 
Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, and John Mer* 
vyn, apd theyme that shalbe taken and named convenable 
in forme aforesaide, to make a new astate of the saide ma- 
ners and other p'misses in fee to other p'sones; and therof 
take astate agen to theyme, and to vi other p'sones in ke ; 
they being so enfeoffed always to p'forme this my p'sente 
wille in every poynte as myne olde feoffees shulde have 
done if they had made no newe enfeoffment. And if my 
wille by eny maner of occasion may not be executed nor 
p'formed within the same terme of x yere, with th'issues and 
profites of the saide maners and other p'misses, than I wuli 
that my saide now feoffees, or they that shalbe new enfeoffed, 
abide and be feoffees fulle of the same, and also suffre the 
saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Knyght, Maister Thomas Hau- 



316 TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

kins, John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Bay- 
nard, John Touke, and John Mervyn, and theyme that 
shalbe so named and taken as is afor^saide, to take th'issues 
and profites therof till my saide wille, and all the p'misses, 
be fully executed and p'formed with the same. And also, I 
wuU that Mary ', doughter to Sir Thomas Hungerford, 
Knyght, have and p'ceyve yerely into the tyme my saide 
wille be p'formed by th^andis of the saide Sir Roger Tocotes, 
Knyght, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Tho- 
mas Tropenell, Robard Baynard^ John Touke, and John 
M^rvyn, or tho that shalbe so named and taken as is above 
rehercedy xl m'rcs, upon condicion that she, neytherher 
gardeyne% nor none other p'sone by hir comm'ndement, will 
neyther assent, lette, neyther intern pte the saide Sir Roger 
Tocotes, Knyght, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mom- 
pesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke, 
and John Mervyn, nor theyme as shalbe so named and 
taken as is aforesaide, to execute this my said wille and 
testament. And if they or eny of theyme do the contry, 
that then my saide wille in this article be voyde and of 
none effect. And after the saide x yere paste, and this my 
p'sente wille, and also my laste wille comprised in my tes- 
tament holy p'formed, I wuU if Water Hungerford, sone of 
my sone Robard, late Lorde Hungerford and Molyns, behave 
hym selfe in every thyng accordyng to this my p'sente 
wille ; and also if the saide Water be feithfull and trew to 
our Soueraine Lorde Kyng Edward and his heires, in con- 
ceruation and kepying of bis allegiaunce duryng ye saide 
terme of x yere, that then he haue the manors of Hayies- 
bury, Tudrington, Hornyngesham, Fenny Sutton, and Cod- 
ford Petre, and the hundred of Haytesbury, with th'appur- 
ten'nce in the saide shire of Wilteshire, to hym and to the 
heires maulys of his body lawfully bogoten ; and for de- 

> Her great-grand-daughter; and the heiress of the Baronial 
families of Hungerford, Botreaux, and Molines, which Baronies she 
carried to her husband Edward second Baron Hastings, of Ashby- 
de*la-Zouche. 

^ Her guardian. 



T£STAMENTA VETUSTA. 317 

faate of sach issue, the remaynder therof to Leonard Hun* 
gerford his brother, and to the heires maulys of his body 
lawfully begoten, if he in like forme behauve hym selfe ac* 
cordyng to this my p'sente wille. And if the saide Water 
and Leonard kepe not their alliegaunce as is afore re- 
herced ; than 1 wuUe that he that so offendith agenste our 
Soueraine Lorde \ or do eny thyng contrary to this my 
p'sente wille or my testament, shall have no maner of 
londis and tenementis as is afore reherced* But than 1 wull 
that he that is nexte in the remainder, and hath not of- 
fended nor done eny thyng contrary to eny of the p'mysses, 
shall have the said londis and tenementis, accordyng to my 
wille above. specified; and for defaute of such issue, the 
remaynder of the saide maners of Haytesbury, Tudrington, 
Hornyngesham, Fenny Sutton^ and Codford Petre, and the 
hundred of Haytesbury, to Sir Edmond Hungerford, 
Knyght% and to the heires maulys of his body lawfully be* 
goten ; and for defaute of such issue, the remainder to the 
right heires of Water, late Lord Hungerford. 

And I wulle that the saide Water, after the said x yere 
paste and this my p'sent wille, and also my laste wille, wicb 
is comprised in my testament holy p'fprmed, have the ma- 
ners of Kilmersdon and Walton, and the hundredys of Kil- 
mersdon and Babyngton, with th'appurten'nces, in the 
shire. of Somerset, for terdie of his lifT. And after his de- 
cesse, to Mary Hungerford, dougter and heire to Sir Tho- 
mas Hungerford, Knight, and to the heires of her body:law- 



> The conditional terms on which the testatrix bequeathed her 
lands to her grandsons Walter and Leonard Hungerford are not 
a little singular ; for Sir Thomas Hungerford, their eldest brother, 
was beheaded and attainted, and their father, Robert Lord Hun- 
gerford and Molines, her eldest son, had been attainted [for their 
adherence to the House of Lancaster ; it is highly probable that 
there was therefore more prudence than loyalty in' the motive 
of Lady Hungerford*s bequest. Both these attainders were re- 
versed in 1485, when the honours of the family became restored to 
Mary, wife of Edward Hastings, before-mentioned, and who was 
summoned to Parliamefit as Lord Hungerford. 

^ Her husband's brother. 



318 TESTAMRNTA VITUSTA. 

folly begoten ; and loir d^faute of such issue, to y« saide 
Water, and to the heires of bis body lawfully begotea ; and 
for defaute of such issue, to the saide Leonard Hungerford, 
and to the heires of his body, lawfully begoten ; and for de* 
faute of such issue, to Kat'yne Lady la Warre S and to the 
heires of hir body lawfully begoten ; and for defaute of 
such issue, the remaynder therof to the right heires of WiU 
Ham, late Lord Botreaux. And also, I wuUe that the saide 
Jjeonard, after the saide x yere paste and this my p'sent 
wille p'formed, as is aforesaide, haue a sufficient graunte 
made unto hym of a annuyte of xh li. yerely oute of the 
maner of Lan'nte, with th'appurtenaunce, in the counte of 
Cornewall; to have to hym and to his heires maulysof his 
body lawfully begoten, paiable yerely at the festis of Seint 
Martyn, in wynter, the Purification of our Lady, Pentecost, 
and Lammas, otherwise callid Seint Petre ad vinc'la, with 
a sufficient clause of distresse in the same maner w* th'ap- 
purten'nce for nonn payment of the same annuyte. And 
for asmoch as the saide Water and Iiconard shall have no 
lyuelode for their sustenance duryng the saide terme, ther- 
for I wuU that in the meane tyme the saide Water shall 
have and take yerely after the decesse of me, the saide 
Margarete, xh li. yerely by th'andia of the said Roger To- 
cotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, John Mompesson, Tho.* 
mas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, John Touke^ and John 
Mervyn, or theyme that shalbe so named, and taken as is 
aforesaide ; and the saide Leonard have likewise yerely for 
his susten'nce for that season xl m'rcs. But yet I wull if 
the saide Mary and hir husbond, that shalbe for the tyme. 
Water and Leonard make not such releces or consynacions 
with wairantes to theyme, that my saide Lorde myne hus- 
bond and I, or my saide feoffees have solde, geven, or 
graunted eny lande unto as is bifore devised, or in eny 
thyng distourble or lette th'execucion of this my wille, or 
do not for the executyng thereof as they shalbe requyred 
by the saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas Haukins, 
John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenell, Robard Baynard, 

' Vide infra. 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 319 

John Tonke/and Joha Mervyn, and theyme that shalbe so 
named, and taken in forme aforesaide, that then he that so 
doth agenste my wille, or refusith thus to do as he shalbe 
thus requyredy have no parte of the saide maners, hun- 
dredis, ne annuyte, nor none other goode heryn by me or- 
deynedy disposed, and dyyised unto hym. And over this, 
I wull that if the saide Sir Roger Tocotes, Maister Thomas 
Haukins, ''John Mompesson, Thomas TropeneU, Robard 
Baynard, John Tonke, and John Mervyn, and they that 
shalbe so named and taken in ye forme byforesaide, be not 
letted by myne heire, beyng of full age, nor by none other 
by his comm'ndementy nor by the gardeyne * of myne heire, 
being w^n age, nor by none other p'sone by his comm'nde- 
mente, in eny poynte to p'forme this my wille, but that the 
same beire do and behauve hymselfe in euery thyng ac- 
cordyng to this my wille, that then, after the same wille 
fully p'formed, my saide heire that is, to wite, Mary, 
doughter and heire to Sir Thomas Hungerford, Knyght, 
haue all the maners, landys, and tenementis by me not 
aliened and sold in my liff, nor otherwise disposed by this 
my last wille ; that wich discended to me by my foresaide 
lorde my fader William Lorde Botreaux, as well tho' that 
be in demesne, that is to say, the man'rs of Penehele, La- 
naunte, Bottele, Codford, Farley, Wurthevale, Botreaux, 

with all other luidis ui4 teo'tU in this my viUe not ia espedall «xprtuedv 

Castell, and Cracampton, a with th'appurtenaunce in the 

counteof Comewall, and the maners of Dupford and Lang* 
ford Leycestre, and the hundred of Stanburgh, with th'ap* 
purtenaunce in the counte of Devonshire, as those be in 
reu'sion, that is to say» the maners of Aire, North Cadbury, 
Henton, Seyuls, Penford, Peblew, Wulwade, and xlS. 
rente goyng oute of the maners of South Pederton, Chet- 
lyngton, Strutton, and Sutharp, in the counte of Somerset, 
that Sir Thomas Burgh, Knyght, and Margarete his wyff, 
have terme of their lyves. And that my saide feoffees 
make estate therof after my saide wille p'formed, to the 
saide Mary, and to the heires of hir body laufuUy begoten ; 

* Guardian. 



320 TE8TAMENTA V£TU8TA. 

and for defaote of such issue^ the remaynder therof to 
Water Hangerford % sone to my sone Robard, late Lorde 
Hungerford and Molyns, and to the heires maulys of his 
body laufully begoten ; and for defaute of such issue, the 
remaynder therof to Leonard Hungerford, brother to the 
saide Water, and. to the heires maulys of his body laufully 
begoten; and for defaute of such issue, the remaynder 
therof to myne owne doughter Kat'yne Lady la Warre % and 
to the heires of hir body laufully begoten ; and for defaute 
of such issue to the right heires of the saide William Lord 
Botreaux my fader. 

Ne'theles, I wuU that if the saide Sir Thomas Burgh and 
Margarete dye durjmg the nonnage of the saide Mary, 
than I wuU that the saide Mary haue and p'ceyve yerely 
by th'andis of the saide Sir Roger Tocotes. Maister Tho- 
mas. Haukins, John Mompesson, Thomas Tropenelli Ro- 
bard Baynard, John Touke, and John Mervyn, and theyme 
that shalbe so named and taken as is aforesaide, c U. unto 
the tyme my said wille be p' formed. And for asmoche as 
afore this tyme I haue solde and aliened parte of my lyve- 
lode, asweU of myne enheritaunce as other, and also solde 
and put away the substaunce of my meovable godis, wich 
hath not bene litell, and endetted my selfein grete sommes, 
for wich mieny of my frendis, neyghbors, and other men 
bith bounde and endaungered for my sake, wich I have not 
done by foly, nor by cause of any excesse or undiscrete 
lib'alite, but oonly I haue been arted and caused by neces- 
site of fortune, and mysaventure that hath happend in this 

' This Walter, who has been before noticed, was the grandfather 
of Walter Hungerford, who was summoned to Parliament as 
" Walter Hungerford de Heytesbury" in the 28th Henry VIH. ; 
he was beheaded in 1541, and having been attainted, his honors be- 
came forfeited ; although his children were restored in blood the 
attainder has never been reversed. 

* Her daughter, Katharine Hungerford, was the first wife of 
Richard West, Baron De la Warr, from whom tlie present Earl 
DelaWarr is descended. As Lady Hungerford had been pre- 
viously alluding to her grand-children, the expression << myne owne 
doughter,*' was probably introduced to distinguish her more clearly. 



TOSTAMENTA VETUSTA. S2l 

seasons of trobill tyme late paste. I haue made to be re- 
raembred in a writjng annexed hereunto S grete parte 
aswell of th'occasions and causis that hane made me to do 
this^ as the specialtees of my grete paymentis and losse of 
goodis^ to this ende, that my kynne and frendis, and 
namely, such as God wull dispose to be myne heire, shall 
neither bane mervaille apon my poverte, nother apon 
th'alienaciona that I hare made of parte of my lyvelode, 
but thynke that I have governed me always honestly, and 
as it was convenyent to th'astate in wich God hath sette 
me in this lyfF; and that therfore myne heires haue none 
occasion to grugge, for that I leve not to theyme so grete 
enheritaunce as I myght and wulde haue done if fortune 
had not bene so sore agenste me ' ; and that by this consi-* 
deracion myne heires have the more cause to streyngthe 
and enforce th'astatis of all such p'sones as I have aliened 
eny of my ly velode unto. Wheryn I p*y theyme, and also 
requyre theyme to be benyvolente, and to do as shalbe 
beste to the suertee and profite of all tho to whom I have 
so aliened eny of my lande. 

Provided and forsene always, that atte all tymes hereaf- 
ter I| the saide Margarete, be at my iredome and liberte to 
chaunge this my wille, adde, and admynnyssh in every . 
poynte and article in this p'sent writyng conteyned duryng 
my naturall liff. 

And in witnesse that this is my verry wille, I haue en- 
cealled this writyng w^ the seall of myne arines, and signed 
hit with myne owne bandis writyng. All the wich my 
wille and declaracion of the same, 1 have p'fitely comend 
and shewed unto the right reverend Fader in God my Lord 
the Bisshop of Salisbury', as to my Diosisan and Fader, 

^ This curious " writ3mg,*' being an account of her costs and 
expenses, and the causes thereof, during her late troubles, is 
printed at large in Sir Richard Colt Hoare's valuable History of 
Wiltshire, Hundred of Heytesbury, pp. 100 — 10?. 

* She here appears to allude to the forfeitures experienced-'both 
by her son and grandson, in consequence of which her revenue 
must have been in a great degree consumed by the maintenance 
of her grand-children. 3 Richard Beauchamp. 



922 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

berjng the care of mj soale for the discharge of my con- 
sciens. And for asmoch as my seall and subscripcion is 
not to meny men knowen, to my saide speciall Lorde and 
Fader I haue made reqaeste and humble besechyng in wit- 
nesse of y® p'misses to patto his grete sealle. 

And I, the saide Bisshop, at the reqaeste of the saide 
Lady Margarete, to this p'sent writyog have putto my 
scale, and signed it with myne hande. And for the more 
evydent knowlege to witnesse the same, at my speciall re- 
qaeste and praier, aswell my maister the Dean and Chapi- 
tre of my said Lordis CathedraU Church of Salisbury have 
putto their comen sealis. 

Writen at Haytesbury the viu day of Auguste, the yere 
of our Lorde God mcccclxxvi, and the yere of the raigne 
of Kyng Edward the Fourth x¥i. 



THOMAS BOLEYN. 

Thomas Boleyn, son of Geoflrey Boleyn *, sometime 
Mayor of London, April £3d, 1471. My body to be buried 
in the Church of Su Laurence, in the Old Jewry, London, 
beside my father. I will that my executor sell my place in 
the manor of Ingham, in Norfolk, and that the money be 
disposed of by Anne, my mother, for the health of my soul. 
And I appoint the said Anne, my mother, my executrix. 
Proved January £6th, 1471 •• 



SIR HENRY BEAUMONT, KNT. 

Henry Beaumont, Knight, November 14tb, 1471- My 
body to be buried in the Church of Wednesbury, in the 
county of Stafford. I will that a chaplain celebrate for 
me in the said Charch, for three years after my decease. I 

' Vide his Will, p. «99. • Query, I47I-2? 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 323 

will that the Lady Eleanor, my wife, have my lands ia 
Eginton, in the county of Derby, and elsewhere, for the 
term of her life, with remainder to John Beaumont, my son 
and heir> by the said Eleanor. And I constitute Eleanor, 
my said wife, my executrix. Proved 30th November 147 !• 



SIR JOHN DE LA LAUND, KNT- 

John De la Laund, Knight, being very aged, this 4th 
day of February 1465', make my will. My body to be 
buried in the Convent of the Augustine Friars, London. 
Thomas my son. Proved April 4th, 1471. 



LADY ELIZABETH BRUYN. 

Dame Elizabeth Bruyn, widow, February 4th, 1470*. 
My body to be buried in the parish Church of South Wo- 
kindon, in . the county of Essex, where the body of Sir 
Morreys Bruyn, Knight, late my husband, lyeth. To Ka- 
tharine Berland, my daughter; to Thomas, my son; to 
Katherine, my daughter ^ Proved June 17th, 1471. 



SIR THOMAS COBHAM. KNT, 

Thomas Cobham, of Starborough, in the county of 
Surrey, Knight ^ April 2d, 1471. My body to be buried in 

.» Query, 1465-6? « Query, 1470-1? 

' Apparently the same person as is described just before as 
" Katherine Berland, my daughter.** 

* Younger son of Reginald Lord Cobham. He married Ann, 
widow of Aubrey de Yere, and daughter of Humphrey Stafford, 
Duke of Buckingham, K. G. Dugdale, vol. i. p. 167; vol. ii. p. 65. 
Vide her Will in page 325. The issue of this Sir Thomas 
Cobham, according to Banks* Dormant and Extinct Peerage^ 
vol. i, p. 271 9 was a daughter Ann, who married Edward Borough, 
or Burgh, father of lliomas Lord Borough, temp. Henry YIII. 

Y 2 



;S24 .Tf:STAMENTA VETUSTA. 

the parish Church of St. Peter's ivithin the college of 
lingfield, in the county of Surrey. To Reginald^ my bas- 
tard son, called Reginald Cobhain ; to Ann Vere, ray most 
.entirely beloved lady and wife, all my goods ; and I ap- 
point her and Thomas Frowicki Gent, my executors. I 
will that my daughter Anne Cobham be in the goTcrnance 
of my wife; Gcrvase Clifton, uncle unto Reginald, my 
bastard son ; to the said Reginald I bequeath my manor of 
Pentlowi called Pentlow Hall, with the advowson of the 

Church of , in Essex ; also a. piece of land in the 

town of Cavendlsbj with the advowson of the Church, 
in. Suffolk, together with lands called Symondbrigge, in 
the parish of Etonbrigge, in the county of Kent. 

Proved July ioth, 1471. 



SIR HARRY STAFFORD, KNT. 

. Harry Stafford, Knight \ son to the noble Prince H»m« 
phrey, late Duke of Bucks, October 2d, 147 1^ My body 
to be buried. in the College of Plecye. To buy xii marks 
worth of livelode by year, to be amortized for the finding 
of an honest and fitting priest to sing for my soul in the 
said college for evermore c lx /. ; to my son-in-law the Earl 
of Richmond % a trappur, four new horse harness of velvet; 
to my brother John Earl of Wiltshire, my bay courser ; to 
Reynold Bray, my Receiver General, my grizzled horse ; I 
bequeath the rest of my goods to my beloved wife Marga- 
ret Countess of Richmond, whom I likewise constitute my 
executrix. Proved May 4th9 1482, * 



■ He married Margaret Countess of Richmond, mother of 
Henry VII. Vide her Will in a subsequent page. 

• Sic in the MS. Note of this WDl ; but Dugdale^s Abstract, 
vol. I. p. 167, states that it was dated October 2d, 1481, and 
which, from the date oPthe Probate, is most likely to be correct. 

* Afterwards King Henry VII. 



TBSTAMfiNTA VBTUStA. 325 



ANN VERB, LADY COBHAM. 

Add Vere, widow*, April 12th, 1472. My body to b^ 
baried id the college of LiDgfield, where the body of my 
dear heart and late husband resteth. To my brother Wilt- 
shire'; to my sister Shrewsbury* my potts with castleS| 
and my crimson velvet gown furred with white ; to my 
daughter Anne% my little coffer with the jewels therein; 
And I appoint my sister Beaumont*^ and my brother Wilt- 
shire my executors. Proved May £d, 1472. 



JOHN HONYWODE. 

John Honywode', of Hethe, 29th Jane 1470. My body 
to be buried in the Chapel of St. Edmund of the Church 
of Heath ; to the brothers and sisters of the hospital of St.' 
Bartholomew of Saltwodc iii«. lyd. My lands and tene- 
ments in Hethe, Westhethe, Saltwode, and Postelynge ; to 
Joane, my wife, my principal messuage in which I now 
dwell, and all my lands and tenements which are partible 
between me and my brother Thomas Honywode, lying in 
Hythe, Westhythe, Saltwode, and Portelynge; to John, 
son of Thomas Honywode; Walter Cales and Agnes his 
wife, my daughter; William Jenkyn and Katherine his 
wife, my daughter. Proved 18th July 1470, at Canterbury. 

■ Daughter of Humphrey Stafford, Doke of Bucks, K. G. widow, 
first, of Aubrey de Yere, son and heir apparent of John de Yere, 
Earl of Oxfordt who, together with bis father, was beheaded 1 Ed- 
ward I Y. by whom she had no issue ; and secondly, of Sir lliomaft 
Cobham, Knight, whose Will is inserted in p. 323. 

* John Stafford, K. G. created Earl of Wiltshire. 

* Katherine Stafford, wife of Jdm Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. 

* By her last husband ; vide note *, p. 323. 

* Joane Stafford^ who married William Viscount Beaumont. 
^ Apparently ancestor of the Baronets of that name. 



3C6 TE8TAMENTA V£TU8TA. 

WILLIAM PONTE, 

William Ponte, 1471. I bequeath towards a new pic- 
tare of St. Marj of Maghiield xx «• if the parishioners 
are willing to re- paint the same ; to any of those who will 
pilgrimage for me to St. Thomas of Canterbury xud.; to 
the Blessed Mary of Walsingham vi s, tiii d. ; to St. Tho- 
mas of Canterbury and St. Stephen near Canterbury ii 
shillings for me and my son. Proved at Canterbury. 



SIMON MONYN. 

Simon Monyn, of St. Margaret de Clyfe, 24th August 
1471. My body to be buried in the Chancel of St. John 
the Baptist of the Church aforesaid. I will that all my 
lands, &c. in St. Margaret aforesaid be sold ; I bequeath all 
my lands, tenements, rents of ferme, and profits, and suits 
of court, with their appurtenances, in Dale, Tenterden, 
Sholden, and elsewhere in the Wald (a certain marsh in 
Pale excepted), to Robert Monyn, of Waldwastan, in tail 
male ; remainder to Joane his sister, and her heirs, for ever ; 
1 bequeath to the said Joane all my lands and tenements in 
Sholden, late my father's Simon Monyn's, and the said 
marsh in Dale, and all those my lands and tenements which 
I purchased in Sholden aforesaid, to be sold. 

Proved 18th Sept. 1471, at Canterbury. 



THOMAS HORNE, ESQ. 

Thomas Home, of Lenham, Esq. 3d June 147 !• My 
body to be buried in the Chancel of St. Edmund of the pa« 
rish Church of that place, before the altar; to the palm cross 
newly erected in Lenham Church-yard xx d. I appoint 
Joan my wife, and Dili William Home and Richard 
Home, my brothers, executors, and John Cherche, of Eas- 
ling, supervisor of this my will. I bequeath my manor of 
East, with lands, tenements, and appurtenances thereunto 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 32? 

belobgiog^ to Joan, my wife, for life, and afterwards the 
said manor and its appurtenances to my own right heirs for 
ever ; but I will that my lands in Ly nstede called Cam- 
breyys, if Joan, my wife, should not be with child at my 
death, be sold; 1 bequeath my lands in Iienham and 
Wychelyng, called Evotys and Wavynes, which John 
Home my father, purchased, to my brother Richard Home; 
Thomas, my bastard son. Proved at Canterbury. 



CECILIA LADY KIRRIEL. 

Cecily Kirriel, in my pure widowhood, 7th April 1472. 
My body to be buried wherever I may happen to die. To 
Isabella Cheney c marks on her marriage ; also a tenement 
inWestfaanger ; to John Kirriell, all my jewels, also my lands 
in Sandwich, together with all my vestments and the uten- 
sils in my^anor of Westhanger ; to John Kirriel, bastard, 
all the aforesaid utensils if the above-mentioned John Kir- 
riell shall chance to die beyond seas ; I will that a chaplain 
be found to celebrate for the souls of John Hill and Sir 
Thomas Kirriell, Knight, late my successive husbands, and 
for the souls of John, Thomas, Roger, and my other sons, 
and for the souls of Katherine, and my other daughters, in 
the Church of the Friars Augustines at Canterbury, for 
one year; to John Cheney, my son, my white ambling 
horse. And I appoint Sir John Scott, Knight, and John 
Cheney, of Polton, in the county of Somerset, Esquire, my 
executors \ Proved l6th July 1473. 



MARGARET DE LA POLE. 
Margaret de la Pole, May 15th, 12 Edward IV. 1472. 

■ The MS. whence the above abstract is taken contains the 
following " Memo. That John Kernel, Esquire, hath delivered to 
my Lady Cecilia Kerriel, 9th September, 29th Henry VL certain 
goods, &c." But as it is very doubtful if this passage formed part 
of the original Will, it is thought best to insert it in a note. 



328 TESTAMEKTA VETUSTA. 

My body to be buried in the moDastery of St. Saviour's of 
Bermoudsey, iu the Chapel called the Virgiu's Ghapel, oa 
the left hand of the altar. I appoint Sir Thomas Hevering- 
ham one of my executors. Proved December 15th, 1473. 



JOHN LORD BERNERS. 

John Bourgchier, Knight, Lord Bamesse \ March Slst, 
1473 ^ My body to be buried in the Chapel of the Holy 
Rood within the monastery of St. Peter, of Chertsey ; J will 
that all my debts be paid ; to the monks of that house a cross 
of silver gilt, having a foot whereon are the images of Mary 
and John, also other jewels and ornaments to the value in 
all of XL /. for my sepultare and that they pray for my souU 
and the soul of Dame Margery my wife, ^nd all our chil- 
dren's souls ; to my wife two cups of gold, &c. ; to my son 
Thomas Bourgchier two pots of silver and gill, &c. ; the 
residue of my goods, jewels. Sec. after my debts paid, I 
wholly give and bequeath to Dame Margery my wife. 
And of this my testament I make and ordain mine execu- 
tors : my wife to be my chief executrice, Thomas Bourg- 
chier, my son, and John Young, my servant ; also I be- 
seech my Reverend Father in God my Lord Cardinal ' to 
see my will performed, and to make a lawful estate to Dame 
Margery my wife in all the lands in Staffordshire for term 
of her life, and after her decease to my right heirs. In 
witness, 8ic. I have set to my seal with mine own band the 
day and year aforesaid. Proved June Sist^ 1474. 



CICELY SELLY. 
Cicely Selly, widow, late wife of David Selly, Esquire, 

' Knight of the Garter, fourth son of William Earl of £we ; 
having married Margery, the daughter and heir of Richard Lord 
Bemers, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Berners. He died 
10th May, 14th Edward IV. 1474. • 1473-4. 

> Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, his brother. 



TESTAMEKTA VETU8TA. 329- 

August lOtb, 147£. My body to be buried in the Churcb* 
of St. Margaret at Westminstery in the tomb of David my 
husband ; to my daughter Margaret my messuage or place 
in Datchet, in Skynner Lane, and a tenement in Datchett's 
where Thomas Hert dwelleth, together with all lands and 
profits of fishing in the water of Thames thereto belonging, 
after the decease of the said Thomas Hert ; I will that Isa^ 
bella and Alice, daughters of Robert Whetelay, late of 
Dachet's, Carpenter, have my tenement in Dacbet's in 
which John Matthew now dwellethr; my wood called Glad* 
wyk, in Donham. And I constitute Robert Spayne, of 
London, Scrivener, and Walter LukingtQn, of Wests, my 
executors, and Nicholas Chiveley Yeomam of 'Crowoer^ 
and John Randolph, Esq. supervisors of this my will. 

Proved July 8th, 1474. 



LADY ELIZABETH ANDREWS. 

Dame Elizabeth Andrews ', on the Feast of St. Luke the 
Evangelist % 1474. My body to be buried in the Chancel 
of the Church of St. Deuys Bakchurch, in London, by the- 
license of the parson of the said Church. I will that all my 
debts be paid ; to the parson of Baileham, for my tithes 
forgotten xx 8. ; to the use of the same church an howse* 
ling towel of diaper, and an altar cloth of diaper, there ta 
remain ; I will that of my two rings with diamonds, the one 
be sent to our Lady of Walsingham and the other to our 
Lady of Wolpit ; to the use of the Church of Stoke beside 
Episwiche a towel and an altar cloth of diaper, and a do^ 
zen sheep to the use of the same Church ; to the high altar 
of the said Church of St. Dennys, in necessary things to be 
bought for the same, xxs,; and to the parson of the said 
Church XX s. ; I will that Bailham Church shall have a 
surplice and rochet ; also that Stoke Church shall have a 



' Collins states that she was the daughter and coheir of John 
Stratton, Esquire, and widow of John Andrews, of Baylham, co. 
Suffolk, Esquire, 

« October 18. 



330 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

surplice made of a piece of lioen clotb containing 
twenty-six yards ; to the Church of Weston, in Norfolk', 
a chalice and twenty yards of linen cloth to make a sur- 
plice, and a towel of diaper, and a towel of cotton ; to Dre- 
niesdon Church a towel and an altar cloth ; to the Church 
of Blakenham a towel apd an altar cloth ; Item, I will that 
as soon as God sendeth for me to his bliss out of this 
world, costs be done of my- burying by the advice and dis- 
cretion of my surveyor and mine executors, and that great 
part of the host be done to poor bedrede people, most need 
having, to the honor and pleasure of God ' ; I will that my 
household and servants be kept eight weeks after my de- 
parting, with wages and other necessaries; to my Lady 
Wyche, my sister, for a remembrance to think of me, a 
goblet of silver and gik cover ; to my daughter Elizabeth * 
a blue gown furred with white ; to mj daughter Anne a 
crimson gown single, and afurr of grey, and a single gown 
of velvettand furr of white; to Andrew Suliard a pair of 
beads of gold; to Ann Suliard, my daughter's daughter, a 
girdle of green, harnessed with silver ; to Bridget Wynde- 
8ore,my daughter Elizabeth s daughter, my white bed with 
all the hangings of the same ; to William Wyndesore a 
red bed of worsted, with aN the hangings ; to Elizabeth 
Wyndesore and Alice Wyndesore, my daughter's daugh- 
ters, two pieces of silver with coverings, and fifteen spoons 
of silver; to my daughter Elisabeth a powder box of silver ; 



-»-^» 



' This bequest, from its singularity, merits a slight notice. 
Amidst the numerous pious directions which form so prominent 
a feature in almost every Will in this Volume, this is the only one 
that desires that the Host, i. e, ^ Holy Sacrament, should be ad- 
ministered to such poor people as from their infirmities were un- 
able to receive it at church. Some expence generally attended 
every Catholic ceremony, and the testatrix thus charitably enables 
those who by poverty and age were confined to their houses to 
partake of the finest, most important, and most consolatory rite of 
Religion. 

* Wife of Thomas Wyndsor, Esquire, ancestor of Elizabeth 
Windsor, who married Dixie Hickman, Esq. from whom the Earl 
of Plymouth is descended. 



TE8TAMENTA VETIJSTA^ SSI 

I will that ten pair or «heet8 of the best be divldedlieMma 
my two daughters ; I will that JokoMSktyinqF^sarvaat, de- 
liver a doublet of defeaoe^ wkidiipraa :fli7 faosband^ to re^- 
main in the smmrinf JBa^ani^ the residue of my goods, 
ftc jriler tike payment of my debts, &c. I bequeath to my 
two daughters, Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Wyudesore, 
and Anne, the wife of John Suliarde. And I make and 
ordain my executors Johu Suliarde, Thomas Wyndesore, 
Elizabeth and Ann their wives ; and { appoint my Lady 
Wyche, my sister, mine overseen 

IN A CODICIL. 

I bequeath my two coverlids, one of cotton, the other of 
silk, the one to the Church of Bailham ; the other to the 
Church of Stoke, and to remain in the manor of Bailham ; 
I will that the new great brass pot remain in the said ma- 
nor of Bailham, to the intent that when the brethren of the 
guild of the Church of Darmesdon, make their dinner, they 
may occupy the same pot for the time, and to deliver it 
again in the said manor of Bailham ; I will that all the wo- 
men servants of my Lady Wyche's house be rewarded by 
the discretion of my overseer and executors* Proved 1 1th 
December 1474 ♦. 



THOMAS HONYWOOD, ESQ. 

Thomas Honywode, of Hitb*, 1st January 1473*. My 
body to be buried* in the Chapel of St. Edmund, of the 
Chapel of I^onard of Hitb. To the brothers and sisters of 
the Hospital at Hith of St. Bartholomew; Joane my 
daughter; to Alice Dalmington, my daughter^my lands in 
Hitbe, Saltwode, Portlyng, and Lyde ; 1 will that my lands 
and tenements in Lyde be sold, that all the rest of my lands 
and tenements remain to my wife Alice for the term of her 
life, after which I will my principal messuage, one garden 

* From the Abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. iv. pp. 71> 72. 
' Apparently the brother of John Honywood, whose will is in- 
serted in p. 325. * Query, 1473-4 ? 



332 TESTAMBNTA V£TUSTA. 

cailled Dentall Garden, and three acres of land lying on the 
Salu, in the parish of Saltwode, to Thomas my son and his 
heirs for ever; but if the said Thomas die without heirs, or 
before' he become of age, without issue, then I bequeath 
the same to my son William in like manner; remainder in 
like manner to Robert, John, and Richard, my sons ; to 
John, my son, after my said wife's decease, my lands and 
tenements at Honywode, in the parish of Portlynge, to 
him and his heirs for ever, but if the said John die without 
heirs, or within age, then I will the said lands to my son 
Richard and his heirs for ever. Proved 12th February 1473.'. 



WILLIAM SONDES, ESQ. 

William Soodds % sen. Esq. of Thruleght, 18th Novem- 
ber 1473. My body to be buried in the North Chapel of 
the Church of Thruleght, in a place there designed and 
set aside for that purpose. To the lights of St. Michael^ 
the Holy Trinity, the Holy Gross, Su Mary, St. Thomas, 
St. Christopher, St. George, and St. Katharine, of Su 
George, St. Margaret, and St. Mary Magdalen, and St^ 
Nicholas, in the said Church ; I will that a memorial of 
me be put up in the Church of Lrngfield, in Surry; Bene- 
dicta, my daughter, wife of Richard Martyn, Jate of Fe- 
versham; Agnes, my daughter; I will that my manors, 
lands, tenements, &c. in Dorking, in the county of Surry, 
be divided into three parts, of whicti the manor of Bradley^ 
and my copyhold lands in West Becbwortb, be part, to re* 
main to my three sons, Richard, John, and William ; I 
bequeath my tenements of More, otherwise called the ma- 
nor of More, in Lingfield, in the county of Surry, and 
other lands and tenements there, and in Ryegate, in the 
said county, to Richard Sondds, my second son, iu: tail 
male; remainder to John, my fourth son; remainder to 
William, my fifth son; remainder to Reginald, my eldest 

' Query, 1473-4 ? 

' Ancestor of Sir George Sondes, who was created Earl of Fe- 
veritham 8th April 1676. 



TESTAM ENTA VETUSTA. 338 

.son ; I will that xny tenement or manor called Le Charti in 
.Dorking aforesaid, be a part in the aforesaid division, to 
be made to John^ my son, in tail male ; remainder in like 
manner to William, Richard, and Reginald ; I will that my 
tenement or manor in Dorking aforesaid, with certain lands, 
tenements, &c. aforesaid, thereunto adjoining, be a part of 
the said division to be made to William, my son, in tail 
male; remainders in like manner to John, Richard, and 
Reginald; remainder of all the aforesaid lands and tene- 
ments, and manors, to my own right heirs for ever ; I will 
that Thomas, my third son, who is intended for the order of 
priesthood, shall have his tenement called Wintsell, in the 
parish of Lingfield, Sec. in the county of Surry, after the 
death of my wife Elizabeth^ who possesses the. same for 
life ; remainder, after the death of the said Thomas, to Re«» 
ginald and his heirs male ; remainder in like manner to my 
900S, Richard, John, and William ; remainder to my own 
right heirs ; I will that my lands and tenements in Cran- 
brooke, and those in Edenbrygge, Westwell, and Dodyng-* 
ton, with all the several lands and tenements belonging to 
the same, in the county of Kent, be sold and disposed of 
by my executors, for the health of my soul ; I will that the 
residue of my manors, lands, tenements, and hereditaments^ 
not herein named, remain to my sou Reginald and his 
heirs male, in the manner and forpn as aforesaid, for ever* 
Provided that nothing heretofore mentioned shall be to the 
prejudice of my wife Elizabeth, with respect, to the several 
estates in her possession, which she oughtao enjoy for life. 
Provided also that Richard Martyn, of Feversham, Gent, 
my son-in-law, have all the lands, &c« in Dorking afore- 
said, and in the county of Sussex, as is settled by a certain 
agreement made between them for this purpose, on his mar- 
riage with Benedicta, my eldest daughter. I will that all 
i^y lands and tenements in Thruleght, with their appurte- 
nances, called Bunstent and Taylor's tenement, excepting 
out of the same one old garden, and a wood adjoining to it, 
lying by and within my wood called Shortwood, which said 
premises I bequeath to Elizabeth my wife and her heirs> 
and to be accounted and possessed with my manor of Thru- 



dS4 T£STAM£NTA VETITSTA. 

Icgb aforesaid ; also I will that some lands near Brokedale, 
lately purchased of Richard Ulfe, of Feversham aforesaid, 
be sold for a marriage portion for my daughter Agnes. 
Proved 18th January 1474, at Canterbury; in the probate 
he is styled William Sonde, late of Thurkgh. 



WALTER LORD MONTJOY. 

Walter Blount, Knight *, April 8th, 1474 *. My body to 
be buried in the Grey Friars, London, according to the ad- 
vice and discretion of my dear and well-beloved Lady and 
wife Anne Dutchess of Bucks', my son, and my executor. 
I will that the bones of my son William be taken out of 
the place where they now lie, and laid on the left side of 
my tomb| and that one tomb serve us both. I ordain that 
the parish Church and Chancel of our Lady at Aylewaston, 
io die county of Derby, be made up and finished com- 
pletely out of my own proper goods, and that a third bell, 
called a tenor, be bought for the said Church ; also I will 
that a convenient tomb in that Church be set over Elene, 
my wife ; and that my executors purchase land of the yearly 
value of X /• and appropriate them to the Hospital of St. 
Leonard, situated betwixt Alkemonton and Bentley, to pray 
for the souls of my ancestors, as also for my own soul, the 
souls of my wives and children, likewise for the souls of 
Humphrey Duke of Buckingham S Richard Earl Rivers, 

* Knight of the Garter. He was created Lord Montjoy20th 
June, 5th Edward IV. by Patent; in the 4th of which reign he 
was constituted Lord Treasurer of. England. He died Dec. 1, 
15th Edward IV. according to Buswell's Knights of the Garter; 
but Dugdale says he died Ist August in that year. 

* This date is taken from a MS. abstract of this Will : the date 
assigned by Dugdale is Jvly 9, 1474. 

* Widow of Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, K. G. 
and daughter of Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, K. G, It 
appears, from the testator mentioning his wife Elene, that this 
Anne was his second wife. 

^ His wife*s first husband. 



TE&TAMENTA VETUSTA. 3SS 

Sir John Wodvyl *, Knight, and for the souh of the Lords 
in old time of that hospital; also I ordain that the master 
of that hospital for the time being shall find continually 
seven poor men, to be chosen by him out of such as had been, 
or henceforth may be, old serving-men with the lord and pa- 
tron of the lordship of Barton, and of the same hospital of 
Su Leonard, or else out of the old tenants of all the lord- 
ships of the said lord and patron for the time being, within, 
the counties of Derby and Stafford ; also I will that the 
master for the time being shall pay weekly unto these se- 
ven poor men im.iv J.; also that every of them, at the 
time of his election shall be of the age of fifty and five 
years at the least, and that they shall have seven kine 
going within my park at Barton, and seven loads of wood 
yearly for their fuel, to be taken within my lordships of 
Barton, Alkmonton, and Bentley; or other lordships in 
Appeltree Hundred, in the county of Derby; also I will 
that the said master shall, every third year, give unto each 
of those seven poor men a gown and a hood of white or 
russet of one suit, one time white and another time russet, 
the gown to be marked with a tayewe * cross of red, and I 
ordain that none of these poor men go a begging, upon 
pain of removal from the hospital ; likewise I will that every 
of them be obliged to say daily our Lady's Psalter, twice, 
within the Chapel of the said hospital ; also I will that 
there be built a mansion, with a square court, next to the said 
Chapel, without any back door, and that the roof of that 
Chapel be raised, the walls enhanced, the windows made 
with strong iron work, with a quire and perclose, and two 
altars without the quire; also I will that the master shall 
wear neither red nor green, but upon his gown of other co« 
lour a tayewe cross of blue upon his left sfde ; and I will 

* Sir John Wodvil, son of Richard Earl Rivers, married Ka- 
therine, widow of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, and sister to 
his wife Anne Dutchess of Buckingham. 

• Query, if a Cross Tau, or St. Anthony *8 Cross^ from St. Anthony 
always being painted with one of a peculiar shape on his habit, 
and to which his name has been given. 



336 TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 

th4t he haveiio other benefice except the parsonage of 
Barton ; also I will that a Chapel of St. Nicholas be built 
at Alkmonton, and that the master of the aforesaid hospital 
say mass there yearly on the feast of St Nicholas *, and at 
other times, according to his discretion, and likewise that 
my feoffees bestow xl/. in making a Chapel within the 
Abbey of Burton; John Blount, my second son; Edward 
my son; to my niece Margaret Blount cc marks to her 
marriage ; to my niece Anne Blount c marks to her mar* 
riage; to my niece Margaret Shirley c marks to her mar-* 
riage ; to my nephew John Roger the lands in Staflfordsbire 
wherein I stand enfeoffed, to his use; to Edward, my son, 
lands called Pede, lying under the park of Stonehurst, in 
the county of Surrey, and an annuity of x marks out of my 
manors of Tolingley and Lnchircfae, in Derbyshire ; the 
Talue of the lands of Siir Thomas Cobjiam, Knight, during 
the nonage, of Ann, daughter and heir of the said Sir Tho- 
mas; the value of the lands of Thomas Blount, and the 
marriage of Robert Blount, son and heir of the said Tho- 
mas ; I will that each parish Church in thq hundred wherein 
I was born have a vestment. And I appoint my sK>ns%1obn 
Blonnt and James Blount my executors*. Proved iOtb 
February 1474-5. 

LADY ALICE WYCHE. 

Dame Alice Wyche % of London, widow, late the wife 
of Sir Hugh Wyche, Knight, late Alderman and Merchant 
of London, June l6th, 1474. My body to be buried in the 

> ■ ■ ..IIP II. I tl. ,.|, ,,..» > 111.!! I ■ ■ II I II. ■ 

' December 6. 
. * From Dugdale^s Abstract, vol. i. p. 5S0, and a MS. note of 
the will. 

* From Collins* Peerage, vol. iv. p. 70, et seq. it appears that 
she was the youngest daughter and coheir of John Andrews, of 
Baylham, in Suffolk, Esq. and that she married two husbands, the 
one Sir Hugh Wyche, who was Lord Mayor of London in 1461 ; 
and the other William Holt, but survived them both. Her elder 
^ster, Elizabeth, was the wife of Thomas Wyndcsore, Esq. Vide 
i^t'^1^ note •, p. 330. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 337 

south side of the cboir of tbe parish Church of St. Denys 
Bakchurch, Loudon, by the sepulture of William Holt, 
my late husband ; to my 'cousin Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Wyndesore, c /. in plate and household of the best ; to 
Andrews Wyndesore, their son, xx /. ; to my god-daughter 
Alice, his sister, xx/. and one of my best standing cups of 
silver and gilt covered, and twelvesilver spoons; to Elizabeth, 
her sister, and William, their brother, x /. each ; to Henry 
Wyche, all my lands, &c. in the parish of St. Michael in 
Basipgshaw, London^ to him and bis heirs, in default of 
which the said lands to be sold by my executors; I will 
that my other lands and tenements in London, and in Es* 
sex, be sold by my executors for the following purposes : 
first, to poor husbands, ploughmen in the country, such as 
have wives and children, and poor widows, and other such 
poor diligent labourers in poor villages cc /. whereof c /. 
to be disposed of in Lewes and Hastings, and thereabouts, 
in Sussex, to pray especially for the soul of William Holt, 
my husband, who was born at Lewes ; item, to one hun- 
dred poor householders, to have every of tbem a milch 
cow and XIII «• IV J. and three ewes, price xvi J. a piece ; 
item, in marriage of poor maidens of good conversation ip 
the country, and in mending the highways cc /. ; and the 
remainder of the said money coming of such sale I will 
that my executors dispose of for my soul and other souls 
as aforesaid as to them shall seem best to be done ; the re- 
sidue of my estate, goods, and chattels, I bequeath to my 
executors, my cousin Thomas Wyndesore, EsqT*; Hum- 
phrey Starky, Esq. Recorder of London; and Henry 
Wellys, Priest ; and to have for their labour, Thomas xl /., 
Humphry xl marks, and Henry xx marks. And I ordain 
John Catesby, serjeant of the law, overseer of my will*. 
Proved November l6th, 1474. 

' Her brother-in-law. 

* From the abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. iv. pp. 7^, 73. 



338 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



GEOFFREY POOLE, ESQ. 

Geoffrey Poole, of Wythune, in the parish of Medmen- 
bam, in the county of Backs, Esquire^ October l£tfa, 1474. 
My body to be buried in the Church of the monastery of 
Birsham, in that county, in the same tomb with Editha my 
wife. My manors of Medmenham and £lsl>oargh ; to my 
daughter Eleanor; to my wife Bona my mansion near the 
Abbey of Medmenham for life, and one silver cup; my 
lands in Stolce Mandeville, in the county of Bucks, to my 
son Henry, with remainder to Sir Thomas Montgomery ' 
and his heirs. And I constitute my sons Richard and 
Henry Poole my executors, and appoint Henry Prior of 
Bersham, and Sir Thomas Montgomery, supervisors of this 
my will. Proved March 21st 1474 (1475). 



JOHN LORD BEAUCHAMP. 

John Lord Beauchamp, Knight', April 9th, 1475. My 
body to be buried in the Church of the Dominican Friars 
at Worcester, in a new Chapel there now to be made on the 
north side the quire, to which house of friars, for my burial 
there, I bequeath xx marks, to be bestowed in vestments 
and stuff, beside an orgad of my own ; and I will that a 
priest of that priory shall daily say mass at the altar 
>vithin that Chapel before my tomb, after the order of a 
trental, for my soul, as also for the souls of my father and 
mother, brethren and sister's, my children's and ancestor's 
souls, and especially for the souls of Sir John Falstoff, 
Knight, William Botreaux, and all Christian souls, taking 
by Uie week for that mass (daily to be so said) viiid. for 

^ Kniglit of the Garter ; in the 28th Henry VL he was appointed 
Lord Treasurer of England, having in the preceding year been 
created Lord Beauchamp of Powyk, and died in 1475. Richard, 
his son and heir, succeeded him in his honors, but dying s. p. m. 
in 1496, they then became extinct. 



TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 339 

eyermore. And I desire my executors to build the said 
Chapel, and to make a tomb for me with my effigy thereon^ 
in alabaster *. 



THOMAS RYCHE. 

Thomas Rycbe % Citizen and Mercer of London, July 
£d, 1471. My body to be buried in the Chapel of Guild- 
hall of London. To Sir Robert Lowe, priest, by the ad- 
vice of my father John Croke, for prayers for my soul^ ; 

I will that all monies which I owe to my father Richar4 
Ryche be delivered by my executors ; to Elizabeth, my 

wife ; to my lady my sister Dame Margaret Walden ■ to 

pray for my soul ; to my cousin Thomas Ryche, the son of 
John Ryche, sometime my brother, xx /• to his marriage; 

• to the of John Ryche, my son, xl«.; to the poor of 

Hoxston; on the day of my burial c 5. to pray for my soul ; 
to my cousin Humphry Starky, Recorder of London. And 
I appoint my father-in-law John Croke, Citizen of London, 
my executor, and I give him xiii/. vi5. viiiJ. for his 
pains. Proved 17th October 1475. 



HENRY SPENCER, ESQ. 

Henry Spenser, of Badby, in the county of Northamp- 
ton, Esquire*, 1476. I appoint my sons John and Thomas 

* Dugdale*8 Abstract, vol. i. p. 250, and the MS. notes. The 
latter, however, states that he ordered his body to be buried in the 
Friars Preachers of Worcester, and that the testator described Sir 
John Falstolf and William Botreaux as his ancestors. 

' Apparently son of Richard Ryche, an opulent mercer of Lon- 
don, and Sheriff of that City in 1441, whose will is inserted in p. 
299, his grandson Richard, being an eminent lawyer^ was cre- 
ated by patent 1 Edward VI. Baron Rich, and was ancestor of the 
Earls of Warwick and Holland. 

* Ancestor of the Duke of Marlborough and of Earl Spencer, 

z 2 



340 T£STAMENTA VETUSTA* 

my execators, and my wife Isabel, overseer of my said 
said will *. 



ROBERT FISHER. 

In Dei nomine, &c. SOth June, 1477- I, Robert 
Fisher *, of Beverley M ...... . My body to be bu- 
ried in the Church of the Blessed Mary of Beverley before 

- ■ ■ ----- 

K. G. ; he died circa 16 Edward tV. leaving by Isabel his wife, 
daughter and coheir of Henry Lincoln, four sons, of whom John 
Spencer, the eldest, was father of John Spencer, of Hodnell, whose 
testament will be found in a subsequent page. 

* Collins* Peerage, vol. i. p, 350. 

■ Father of the celebrated Cardinal John Fisher, Bishop of Ro- 
chester, who was bom in 1459 at Beverley, in Yorkshire; his parents 
who, in a MS. life of this prelate at Gresham College, cited in Harl. 
MSS. 7030, are said to have been of << honest state and condition, and 
by trade of merchandise left behind.them a competent wealth.*' His 
father, the testator, died whilst he was a minor, leaving the said John, 
and Robert a younger son ; their mother is stated to have mar- 
ried secondly, a person named Wright, by whom she had issue 
three sons, John, Thomas, and Richard, and one daughter, Eliza- 
beth, who took the veil at Dartford ; but from the manner in which 
the testator bequeaths the residue of his property to his own chil- 
dren, and which, from its singularity, is given verbatim, it would 
seem that his wife then had children by a former husband. If Bi- 
shop Fisher was born in 1459 he must have been about IS at his fa- 
ther's death, so that he could not have been long under the 
guardianship of his mother, on whom, in the manuscript just 
quoted, there is an eulogium for the kind manner in which she 
educated her sons, by Robert Fisher. The unmerited fate of the 
Bishop has been so oflen related that it is needless to say more in 
this place of a Prelate who afforded so splendid an instance of firm- 
ness and devotion, to the dictates of hisconscience; attesting the one 
by a steady defence of the persecuted Katherine of Arragon when 
abandoned by the rest of the world, and proving the latter, by re- 
fusing, at the expence of his life, to acknowledge hi« sovereign's 
pretensions to ecclesiastical supremacy. 

* This word is illegible. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 341 

the Cracifix. I will that a chaplain celebrate for my soul 
for one year; to the fabrick of tiie Church of St. John of 
Beverlye XX rf. ; to the Cathedral Church of St. Peter of 
York VIII {2.; to both houses of Friars of Beverley in«. 
riiirf. ; to the Church of the Haly Trinity, that they may 
pray for my soul xiiis. iv d.^ I bequeath to Dno Robert 
Rux, Vicar of the Church of the Blessed Mary Virgin, vi5. 
VIII {2.; to John Plumber, Chaplain, vis. viud.; to Tho- 
mas Wykcliffe, my brother, vis. viiid,; to Elena his 
wife, my sister, vis. viiid.; to William, my brother 
XLviis. which he owes me; to the same William, be- 
sides what he owes me, xiiis. ; to the Abbot and Con* 
vent of Hawnby, in the county of Lincoln, xs. to celebrate 
a trental of masses for my soul; to Clemence Cherington 
II s.; to the fabrick of the Church of Hotoft, in the county 
of Lincoln iii s. iv d. ; to each " liberorum meorum de mea 
p'pria parte ''liii #. ivd. and if it so happens that either. of 
them die within age, then I will that the part of him so 
dying be equally divided ; the residue of my goods not be- 
queathed, after the expenses of my funeral and all. my 
debts be fully paid, I bequeath to Agnes my wife. And I 
appoint the said Agnes and John Tigleston my true and 
lawful executors, and Thomas Fisher, my brother, and 
Thomas Wykeliffe, n^y supervisors. Witnessed by Robert 
Ruk, Vicar of the Church of the Blessed Mary Virgin, 
John Wollarz, John Copy, and others. 

Proved 26th June^ the year aforesaid \ at York. 



FULK LORD FITZWARINK 

Fulk Bourgchier Lord Fitzwarine% April 1st, 1475. If 
I die beyond the seas I will that my body be buried near 



* Sic in the Harl. MSS. 7030, which appears to be an official 
copy of the original, but as it was dated the thirtieth of June, it is 
of course erroneous; it was probably proved die 26th July 1477. 

* He was summoned to Parliament ISth Edward IV. and died 
September 12th, 19 Edward IV. 1479. 



84«2 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

to the place of my death ; but if in England, then in the 
Chapel of our Lady adjoining to theChurcb^yard atBaun* 
ton, near to the grave of the Lady Thomasine my mother; 
I will that a fair stone of marble, with an inscription 
thereon, be with all speed laid upon the grave of William 
Lord Fitzwarine, my father, and another on the Lady Tho- 
masine, my mother, and a third upon my own grave ; to 
the priest celebrating in that Chapel, to pray for my soul 
and the souls of my parents and ancestors, for twenty 
years, xls. per annum. And [ appoint Elizabeth*, my 
wife my executrix*. Proved November 10th, 1480. 



JOHN KNYVETT, ESQ. 

John Knyvet, of Great Stanwey, in the cOtinty of Essex, 
senior. Esquire, February ' 10th, I476*. My body to be 
buried in the Chancel of the Church of All Souls at Stan* 
wey. To my wife Joan my ^lanor of Sampfordes in Great 
Waldingfield, in the county of Suffolk, for the term of her 
life, with remainder to my son Thomas and the heirs of his 
body ; remainder to my son John ; to my said son John the 
manor of Downhall, in Essex; my manor of Newington 
Belhouse; my sons Richard and Robert. Proved June 
28 th, 1486. 



ELIZABETH DUREM. 

Elizabeth Durem, widow, late wife of John Durem, late 
one of the Barons of the King's Exchequer', June 5th, 
1476. My body to be buried in the Church of St. Bartho* 

' Who was sister and coheir of John Lord Dinham, K. G. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 131, and MS. note. 

• Query, 1476-7 ? 

' John Durem was appointed Baron of the Exchequer May ^6\h, 
1449. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 343 

lomew in Smithfield, by the body of my hasband. To my 
aoD-in-Iaw John Fitz-GeofFrey and Elizabeth bis wife, my 
daughter; to John Tailard, my son-in-law, and Ann his 
Wife, my daughter; whereas the said John Durem, by hi9 
last will, willed that Ann his daughter and mine, wife to 
John Taylard, should have certain lands in Wendover^ in 
Bucks, after my decease^ and whereas Thomas Durem, my 
son and heir, contrary to the will of his &aid father, hath 
entered, and them occupieth, I will that the said John Tay- 
lard and Ann his wife have other lands in the counties of 
Northampton, Bedford, and Huntingdon. And I appoint 
William Essex, Gent. John Fitz-GeofTrey, Gent. John 
Taillard, Gent, and Thomas Torald, Gent, my executors. 
Proved 5th ApriH477. 



JOHN WENLOCK. 

% 

John Wenlock^ last day of October 1477. My body to 
be buried in the parish Church of St. Andrew's, by Bay- 
nard's Castle, where I have ordained my tomb and epi* 
taph. To my sister Joan Cowle ; ^' to my niece Margaret 
CoIfoxe> to refresh her husband and her withal xl marks;" 
to. my niece Jennet, to her marriage x l marks ; to my mas* 
ter ', Sir Humphry Talbot, a standing cup of gold ; to my 
son Thomas, all my lands in Wenlock, and Whitcherche, 
and DodingtoD, Chenell, Eddisley, FoUeswardyng, Rowte- 
ball, and. Attarley, in the county of Salop, and to my said 
son Thomas, all goods and plate which I left at Kenyster, 
on my father-in-law's place ; I will that a chauntry be 

V As it is evident that the testator possessed considerable pro- 
j^erty, the inference to be drawn from this expression is that 
^e held some office, such as esquire or steward, in the establish- 
ment of Sir Humphrey Talbot. From so much being said about 
the. family of Talbot in his will, it was expected that either Collins 
qr Dugdale, in their account of that house, would have mentioned 
this John Wenlock, but his name does not occur in the statement 
of either of these writers. 



3M TESTAMRNTA VETUSTA. 

fbonded in the Church of Su Andrew, to pray for the soak 
of my Lord of Sbrewsbary and roy Lady his wife, also foe 
the soals of John Wenlock and Isabella his wife, and for 
the soals of Richard Legett and Jane his wife; 1 will 
that c /. be expended on a tomb near that of my Lady 
Shrewsbnry, there, as she is buried, before Jesas, if the 
Dean and Chapter of Paal's will give license*. And I 
appoint my master. Sir Hamphrey Talbot, Mr^ Thomas 
Wynterborne, Dean of Paul's, and John Hewet, my exe- 
cutors. Proved 10th December 1477* 



RICHARD FOULER. 

Richard Fouler, Chancellor of the Dutchy of Lancaster. 
My body to be buried in the aisle of the Church of St. 
Romwold, in the Prebendary of Bucks, begun of new to 
be made, and I will that there be no tomb, but only a fiat 
stone with images and scutcheons. I bequeath lxx 
marks, therewith to find a convenable and virtuous priest 
to say divine service and to sing mass in the said aisle, and 
to pray for my soul, and the souls of my father and my 
mother, and for the souls of Sir Walter, late Bishop of 
Norwich *, of Dame Isabel Shotesbroke, and of Walter, 
Henry, and Thomas, and for all Christian souls, for the 
space of seven years next ensuing after my decease; and I 
will that the said priest have yearly for his salary x marks; 
to the high altar of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln xx5. ; 



' Sic in the MS. whence the above abstract is taken ; but Dug- 
ddle, who cites Stow, observes, that Margaret Countess of Shrews- 
bury, apparently the wife of John first Earl of Shrewsbury, was buried 
'^ in a certmn place called Jesus Chapel in St. Pbul*s," and diat '• it 
was intended that a fair monument of an hundred pound value 
should have been erected, but instead, &c.** vol. i. p. S30. It is 
possible that the passage in the above will is the intention alluded 
to. Vide the will of Sir Humphrey Talbot in a subsequent page. 

* Walter Hart was Bishop of Norwich from 1445 to 1479. 



^ 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. S4f5 

to each of the Churches of Moasten, Foscote,. Okeley, 
ThorntoD, Thornborough, and Padbury xl s. in money, in 
satisfaction and discharge of my father's soul of such mo- 
ney as was given and bequeathed unto them by Dame Isa- 
bel Shotesbroke aforenamed, which should have been paid 
by my said father ; to Joan, my wife, all my stuff of my 
household in all places, and all my grains, and all cattle 
excepting my cattle on the manor of Shobendon ; to my 
aunt Sybil Quartermains ; to my daughter Sybil Chamber- 
layne; to my sister Alice Rokselme; to my sister Sybill 
Danvers; I will that Joan, my daughter, be married to 
Edward Stradlinge, my ward, at the age of fifteen, with 
cccc marks portion ; also I will that my wife have the re- 
venue of my manors of Shobendon, Watrestratford, Stok- 
holt, and Stuteley, Bourton, Mourton, Foscote, and Sfaaf- 
ston, in Bucks, my dwelling place in Bucks only excepted, 
the which I will that my brother Thomas Fouler have for 
life ; [ will that the aisle of St. Romwold's Church, where 
I am to be buried, and where my iriends are buried^ be 
finished at my cost, and that a new tomb or shrine for the 
said '^aint, where the old is now standing, be made cu- 
riously with marble, in length and breadth as shall be 
thought convepient by my executors, consideration being 
had to the room; and upon the same I will that there be 
set a coffin or a chest, curiously wrought and gilt, as it ap- 
pertaineth for to lay the bones of the said saint in, and this 
all to be done at my cost and charge ; also I will that a 
monk or priest sing daily in the Chapel of St. Dunstan's, 
in the Abbey of Westminster, where my father lieth buried, 
for the term of five years, with a salary of vi marks yearly 
if a monk, and x yearly if a secular priest ; I will that x /• 
be disposed of at my burying among poor people, and that 
X /. be given to the marriages of poor maidens not having 
father or mother; also I will that my executors release to 
my brother Thomas Fouler all debts ; I will that my feof- 
fees in my lands at Chicheley, in the county of Bucks, make 
an estate to my servant John Byrde and his heirs. And I 
appoint the Reverend Father in God William Bishop of 



946 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Diirham % William Hastings, Knight, Lord Hastings, the 
King's Chamberlain*; Mr. John Mourton, Clerk of the 
Rolls of the King's Chancery'; Joan my wife; and Henry 
Davers, Citizen and Mercer of London, my executors ; and 
I bequeath to each of iny said executors a standing cup 
covered of silver and gilt, by way of remembrance. And I 
yri\l that if any of tbesQ named executors refuse to take 
upon him the charge as executor, then I will that he refus- 
ing, stand and be supervisor of this my testament and last 
will, receiving the said cup. Proved 19th November 1477. 



MARGERY LADY ROOS. 

Margery Lady Roos«, August SOth, 1477. My body to 
be buried in the Chapel of Su Margaret and St. Bernard at 
Cambridge, on thevnorth side of the quire, under my win* 
dow of the said Saints >; to Henry Wentworth, my heir, 
twelve dishes of silver; and I will that the said Henry shall 
cause at his own proper expence, the body of my Ather, 

^J^mm^m^^t>a^mmmm iii I bpi ■■■»■ lit ■■ ■ ■■■■■! ■ ■ t h m^mmm^m^^m^mmi^^K^t^^ 

■ The only WiUiam Bishop of Durham, which occurs for several 
centuries, is William Dudley, who was elevated to that see in 147$, 
which fixes the date of this wiM very closely, for it was proved in 
November 1477 ; it was probably made shortly before the testa- 
tor's deathb / 

* William Lord Hastings was appointed Lord Chamberlain of 
the King's Household in the Ist of Edward IV. Dugdale. 

s John Morton was Master of the Rolls from May 2d, 1475, to 
May SOth, 1478, when he was succeeded by Robert Morton. 

« She was the daughter and heir of Sir Philip Wentworth, Knt. 
and married, first, John Lord Boos, who died without issue 22d 
March, 9 Henry V. H21, leaving her, says Dugdale, vol. i. p. 552, 
** a young widow ;" she married, secondly, Roger Wentworth, by 
whom it appears she hkd the children named in her will, and died 
28th April 18 Edward IV. 1476. 

* The above abstract differs from Dugdale's, as the latter says, 
** under the window of All Saints ;*' the expression my mndow pro* 
bably meant that she had given the window to that Chapel. 



TBSTAMENTA VETU8TA. 847 

• 

Dni Philip Wentworth, Knighti to be transferred to the 
Church of Newsam, in Lincolnshire, and a marble stone to 
be laid over his body ; and another marble to be laid upon 
the body of his tnotber, in the Church of the Friars Minors 
at Ipswich; to my son Thomas Wentworth, Chaplain; 
to John Constable, son of my daughter Agnes Constable ; 
Roger Wentworth, son of Thomas Wentworth *. 

Proved May 28th, 1478. 



SIR JOHN ELRINGTON. 

John Elrington, Knight, Treasurer of the Household *. 
My body to be buried in the Church of Shoreditch. To 
Margaret, my wife, c marks, and the stuff at Dixson or 
at Hoxton ; to my wife's daughter, by William Blount, c 
marks; to my daughter Anne c/.; to Simon, my eldest 
son, c marks in plate; John, Thomas, and Edward, my 
younger sons; my daughter Joane, wife of John Colte. 



LADY ANNES SAY. 

Dame Annes Say, widow*, June 11th, 1478. My body 
to be buried in the parish Church of St. Bartholomew the 



* From Dugdale*s Abstract, vol. i. p. 542, and the MS. notes. 

' There is no date assigned to this will in the abstract sent to 
the Editor by Mr. Baker, to whom he has so often had cause to 
express his obligations, but he conjectures it to have been made 

in 1478- 

* She appears to have been the daughter of Danvers, and 

married, first, Lord Wenlock, vide a note to p. 297 ; and se- 
condly, to Sir John Fray, who was Lord Chief Baron of the Ex- 
chequer from February 9th, 1436, to May 2d, 1448, bywhom she 
had Elizabeth, his eldest daughter and coheir, who married Sir 
Thomas Waldegrave, Knight, ancestor of the Right Honourable 
the Earls of Waldegrave ; and thirdly, Sir John Say, Knight. 



Si8 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

Little in Londoa, near to the tomb where Sir John Fray, 
Knight, my late husband, lieth buried. To a priest to 
sing for the souls of my Lord Wenlock, Sir John Fray, and 
Sir John Say, my husbands, the trental of St. Gregory, in a 
place to be assigned him by Dame Margaret Leynham^ the 
wife of Sir John Leynham, Knight, my daughter. 1 for- 
give my brethren Thomas Danvers and William Danvers, 
all what they owe me ; to Anneys, Katherine, and Marga- 
ret, my daughters; to Richard, my brother; to Constance 
Dye, my daughter's daughter; to Dame Anneys Gate, wi- 
doWy my daughter, mother of the said Constance Dye ; I 
will that the aforesaid Margaret Leynham have a cup of 
silver, bason, and ewer, which was given her by the said 
Sir John Fray, late my husband and her father; to Kathe* 
rine Stafford, my daughter; to Alice Tracy. And I ap- 
point my daughter Dame Elizabeth Walgrave, Henry Dan- 
vers, and John Copton, Esquire, my executors. Proved 
July l6th, 147fi. 

WILLIAM BROKEMAN. 

William Brokeman, of Westhadelesfield, in Lyminge, 
gth March 1477 *. To Thomas Brokeman, my son, all my 
lands and tenements in Lyminge, Elham, and Acrise, to 
him and his heirs for ever; to John, my son, all my lands 
and tenements in Sevyngton and Rokesinge in tail general; 
remainder to my son Thomas and his heirs forever. Proved 
nth March 1477 ', at Canterbury. 



THEOBALD EVYAS. 

Thebaude Evyas, of Feversham, widow, 12th April 1478. 
My body to be buried within the monastery of St. Saviour 
in Feversham. To the making of a new window in the 
Chapiter House of the said Monastery xx5.; to the afore- 
said monasterie my great cloth of tapestry work, to do wor- 

» Query, 1477-8? 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA^ 349* 

ship to God, in their presbytarye, and on the sepnlche next 
the high altar there on high days ; to the Abbot and Con* 
vent of the monasterie of Feversham, my vestment of 
greene velvet, embroydered with .... otes, all that apper- 
teineth to the said vestment, a chalice of silver gilt, two 
crevfets of silver, a bell of silver, a paxbrede of silver, to 
the intent that they shall serve only in my chapel, and that 
there be embroydered in the said vestment " Orate pro 
anima Theobanlde Evyas," and that my cross of gold^ 
which I wear about my neck, be offered after my decease 
to the shrine of St. Richard in Chycester; I bequeath my 
beads of gold to St. John hys bed in Amyas; my ring of 
gold with the rubie to the sepulture of the three kings of 
Coleyne; my sister Apultrefeld; John Evyas the elder; 
Thomas £vyas his brother; I will that the said Thomas 
and John £vyas the younger have such lands as be called 
purchased lands to the manor of Easthall, which were pur- 
chased by me, and all other lands purchased by me in 
Kent, out of the liberties of the Cinque Ports, to have to 
them and their heirs, in the same form and manner as^is 
ordained to them by the last will of their fader made of his 
purchased lands; also I will that lands shall be bought by 
my executors to the yearly value of x /. above all charges 
or reprises, with the yearly rents and profits thereof; that 
the reparations of my almshouse be kept, the renewing of 
the bedding of the said house be made, and the reward of 
him who shall have the governance and oversight of the 
said house yearly paid, and this ordinance touching the 
said almshouse to be made sure as long to endure as by the 
discretion of my overseer, my executors, and such councel 
as they shall take them, can be made. 
Proved 8th April 1479, at Canterbury. 



SIR WALTER MOYLE, KNT. 

Walter Moyle, of £stwell. Knight, 11th December 1479* 
My body to be buried within the chancel of the parish Church 
of Estwell aforesaid. John Lane, Rector of Estwell. I will that 



350 TE9TAMENTA VETU8TA. 

my feoffees make an estate, in two acres of land, more or less, 
lying in the parish of Estwell, in a field called Calinglond, 
and deliver the same, in fee simple, to three or four honest 
men, to the use and behoof of the Church of Estwell afore- 
said^ in recompence of a certain annual rent of £ lb. of 
wax, by me wrested and detained from the said Church 
against my conscience; I bequeath all my lands, tenements, 
&C. in the parishes of Bydendon, Staplehnrst, and Snereden, 
to my wife Margaret, and her heirs and assigns for eyer» 
Proved 31st July 1480, at Canterbury. 



SIR RALPH VERNEY, KNT. 

Ralf Vemey, Knight, Citizen, Mercer, and Alderman, of 
London *, June 1 ith, 1478. My body to be buried in the 
Church of St. Martin Pomerye, in Iremonger Lane, Lon- 
don % that is to wit, in the tomb standing under the sepul- 
ture between the choir and our Lady's Chapel of the same 
Church ; to my daughter Margaret Ralegh and Beatrice 
San vers ; to my sons John and Rauf Vemey'; to the friars 

' He was Lord Mayor of London 1465, and bore for his arms. 
Azure, on a cross Argent, five mullets Gules. It does not appear 
that this Sir Ralph Vemey was related to the family of Ver- 
Dey, ancestors of the Lords Wllloughby de Broke ; though about 
fifty years afterwards the latter were connected with the houses 
of Danvers and Ralegh. 

' This Church was burnt in the Fire of London in 1666, and has 
hot been rebuilt ; it stood on the present Church-yard. 

' Afterwards Sheriff of Bedfordshire. He was the ancestor of 
Sir Ralph Vemey, who was created a Baronet in 1661, and whose 
descendant Sir John, the third Baronet, was created Baron Vemey 
of Belturbet, and Viscount Fermanagh, in Ireland^ in 1703 ; he 
died in 1717, leaving Ralph Verney, his son and heir, who was ad- 
vanced to the Earldom of Verney, in Ireland, in 1743 ; Imd his 
Lordship dying in 1752, Ralph, late Earl Vemey, &c. his second 
son (John his eldest son having died vitapatris s. p. m.) became his 
successor in all his dignities ; on whose death, s. p. in 1791, then 
became extinct. Mary Verney, the daughter and sole heir of the 



T£8TAMENTA VETUSTA* S5l 

dt Aylesbury in Buckingbamsfaire lxVm. viiidL; to tb^ 
repairs of the Chorch of Fleet Merston, in the said couoty^ 
and for oraaments^ things^ and necessaries to be provided 
for the said Chnrch € «. ; to the repairing aiad amending of 
** noyous and ruynous " ways near aboat Aylesbury and 
Fletemerton x 2. ; to my cousin Joan Ralegb, daughter of 
Sir Edward Ralegh and of my daughter Margaret, to b^r 
marriage c marks; to John Pyking, my wife's son, c marks; 
to my ^' trewe lover John Browne ^, Alderman of London^^ 
to be one of th« overseers of this my present testament, and 
to have a remembrance upon my soul one of my cups co- 
vered with silver gilt.; toTbomas Beleter, .Mercier^ of LondoXi, 
the like cup. And 1 appoint £mma> my well beloved wife, 
John Vemey and Half Verney, my sons, and Henry Dan- 
vers, Mercer of London, my executors ; and the said John 
Brown, Alderman, and Thomas Beleter, Mercer, overseers 
of this my will. Witnessed by Richard Rede, parson of 
St. Martyn's^ and Sir William Barbo. Proved 25th June 
147 . • 



EUSTACE GRENVILLE, ESQ. 

Eustace Grenville%at Wotton,*on the feast of St. Cle- 
menta. Pope and Martyr', 1479- My body to be buried in 
the chancel of the Church of Wotton. To the light of the 
Blessed Mary in the said Church of Wottoq three poiind$ 
of wax in candles and two torches ; to the altar of the 

Honourable John Vemey above mentioned, eldest brother of 
Ralph the last Earl Verney and Viscount Fermanagh, was created 
Baroness of Fermanagh, in Ireland, in 1799> but on her demise in 
1812, s. p. that dignity likewise became extinct. 

' Sir John Brown was Lord Mayor of London in 1480. 

* Ancestor of his Grace the present Duke of Buckingham and 
Chandos, K. G. ; he married two wives, first, Margery, daughter 
of .... Brian, by whom he had no issue; and secondly, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Baldwin Botteler, Esq. and at length his sole heiress* 
This Eustace died in 1480. Collins, vol. v. p. 241. 

' November 33d. 



3Si TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 

Blessed Mary in the said Church one bushel of wheat and 
as much of barley, and to the lights of the holy cross there 
one bushel of barley and as much of beans, and the same 
to the light of St. Katherine there; also I will that a chap- 
lain celebrate divine service for one year for the souls of 
my wives, parents, and benefactors, and all Christian souls ; 
to my son Richard x /. ; to my son Eustace vi /. as also 
Hadenham, with the lands there for term of his life ; I will 
that my debts be paid out of the profits of Wotton as well 
as Hadenham, and the rest and residue of my goods I be- 
queath to Thomas Fowler, Esq. Guy Westcote, Esq. and 
Thomas Salmon, whom I constitute my executors, to be 
disposed of for the health of my soul *• 



THOMAS WYNDESOR, ESQ. 

Thomas Wyndesor, Esquire ', of the parish of Stanwell, 
in the county of Middlesex, August 13tfa, 1479> 19 Edward 
IV. My body to be buried in the north side of the quire of 
the Church of our Lady of Stanwell before the image of 
of our Lady, where the sepulture of our Lord standeth ; 
whereupon I will that there be made a plain tomb of marble 
of a competent height, to the intent that it may bear the 
blessed body of our Lord and the sepulture at the time of 
Easter, to stand upon the same, and with mine arms and a 
scripture convenient to be set about the same tomb, by the 
advice of mine executors and overseers under written ; item, 

* From the abstract in Collins' Peerage, vol. v. p. 241. 

' Ancestor of the Right Honourable the Earl of Plymouth. He 
was summoned on July 5, 1483, to receive the honour of knight- 
hood at the intended coronation of Edward V. which was proposed 
to be solemnized on the 29d of that month, but the death of the 
young King prevented his having that honor conferred on him. 
His wife Elizabeth, the daughter and coheir of John Andrews, soon 
after his death, 1 Henry VII. married Sir Robert Litton, Km'ght. 
Collins. 



TBSTAMENTA VETUSTA, 353 

I will that I have burning at my burying and funeral ser- 
vice four tapers and twenty-two torches of wax, every taper 
to contain the weight of. ten pounds, and every torch six- 
teen pounds, which I will that twenty-four very poor men, 
and well disposed shall hold, as well at the time of my bu- 
rying as at my month's mind, and that every of the said 
twentv-four men shall have for his labour for both times 

m 

y\\\d. and a gown of frize; the poor men of the parish of 
Stanwell to be thereto preferred before all other parishes ; 
Item, I will that after my month's mind done, the said four 
tapers be delivered to the churchwardens of the said 
Church of Stanwell, two of them to burn yearly as long as 
they will endure, about the sepulture of our blessed Lord at 
the time of Easter, and the other two to help the light that 
standeth upon the branch before the image of our Lady in 
the quire there, as long as the same wax will endure, to the 
intent that the five candlesticks may burn at the anthem of 
our Lady in the quire, and at all other times convenient as 
aforetime hath been used; Item, I will that there be three 
priests and three clerks, after the discretion of my execu- 
tors, to sing by note in the Church of Stanwell placebo and 
dirige and mass of requiem every day during thirty days 
next after my decease, and to pray for my soul and for all 
Christian souls ; of the aforesaid twenty torches, after my 
funeral service, I bequeath four to the Church of Stanwell 
and the other sixteen to sixteen churches within the county 
of Middlesex, next adjoining to the said Church of Stan- 
well, the Chapels of Woxbridge and Houndeslow having 
each of them one. Item, I will that there be one hundred 
children, each within the age of sixteen years, at my 
month's mind, to say our Lady's Psalter for my soul in the 
Church of Stanwell, each of them having wwd, for his la- 
bour ; and that before my month's mind the candles burnt 
before the rood in the said Church, with all other lights 
burnt before our Lady, the Trinity, or any other Saints, in 
the said Church, be renewed and made at my cost; Item, 
I will that at my month's mind, my executors provide 
twenty priests besides the clerks that come to sing placebo, 
dirige, and mass of requiem, on the morrow, and that they 

A A 



354 TESTAMBNTA VBTU8TA. 

be rewarded after the discretion of my executors, because 
some of them may come further than others ; also I will that 
a convenient dinner be provided, to the pleasure of God, 
and the comfort of my lovers and friends whom it shall 
please to be there at that time, with all my tenants at Stan- 
well; Item^ I will that x/. be distributed amongst my poor 
tenants, who are householders in Stanwell and other towas 
adjoining, viz. to every poor householder of Stanwell i s. 
VIII <f. and of the other towns xii d. as far as it will go; also 
I desire and charge my executors to satisfy and pay all such 
debts and duties as of right I ought to pay to any person 
or persons at the time of my decease ; Item, I will that they 
provide an honest and well disposed priest to sing and say 
divine service in the said Church of Stanwell, or in my 
Chapel at my manor of Stanwell, during the term of 
twenty years next after my decease, and to have for his 
wages VI /. xfiM. luid, and find himself; or else that my 
wife or my heir to give him meat and drink and. xxxv 5. 
iiii J, in money and a gown, to the intent to pray for my 
soul, the souls of my said father and mother, the soul of 
Dame Alice Wyche, and all Christian souls ; Item, I will 
that such of my servants as dwell with me be kept together 
at Stanwell, where my wifeis, with meat, drink^ and wages, 
during a year next ensuing my decease; Item, I will that 
Elizabeth my wife, or Andrews my son, or who at my de* 
cease may be my heir> ordain and keep solemnly my obit by 
note with six priests and three clerks in the said Church of 
Stanwell yearly^ during the space of forty years next after 
my decease, to pray for my soul, the souls of my father, 
mother, of John Andrews and of Elizabeth his wife, and of 
Dame Alice Wiche, and my friends' souls, and all Christian 
souls ; the said priests to be found out of the issues and 
profits of my purchased lands; also I will that myfeofiPees 
stand seised of my estates until Anthony Windesore, my 
youngest son, come to the age of twenty-one years, if he so 
long lives. Provided that if my son Andrews, or other, of 
my sons that shall happen to be Lord of Stanwell and next 
heir of all my lands, find my priest and my obit, that then 
my feoffees suffer my heir to receive the profits thereof, and 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 355 

mftke estate of the said manors and lands to the said An- 
drews liny son, or to him of my said sons that shall be alive 
after twenty-one years ; Item, I will that Elizabeth, my 
wife, have the rale and oversight of my lordship and manor 
of Bailham,in the county of Suffolk, during the nonage of 
Williarri Windsor, my son, if God fortune she lives so long 
after my decease; and if she die I will that John Catesby, 
Serjeadt at Law, and John Holgrave and my executors 
have the rule of the said manor, and I pray them to be aid* 
ing to my said son William ; Item, I will that after twenty 
years past every one of my said sons shall, beside what 
I have bequeathed to them, havexx /.; to Ann, my daugh- 
ter, c marks towards her marriage ; also I will that my daugh- 
ters Elizabeth and Alice be contented with such goods as I 
delivered to their marriages ; and I desire that to my chil* 
dren not named in my will, my executors give atid deliver 
to them part of the issues, of my purchased lands, to their 
marriages according to their discretion ; Item, I will that 
there be paid cL in performing of such articles as be not 
finished in the last will of Dame Alice Wyche, which ap- 
peareth in the great ledger, of such debts as be due to her, 
as soon as they can be recovered, and all such dues as I owe 
to the Lady Fowler > and to William Puttenham % by my 
daughters' marriages, that such laifds as I have of them for 
their jointures shall rest in their hands until they be content 
and paid ; to the Lady Abbess and Convent of Burnham 
xt marks, in contentation of what she claims of me, if it be 
her due, and if not, that she and her convent pray for my 
soul and all Christian souls ; the residue of my goods, &c. 
not bequeathed, I give to Elizabeth my wife, whom I con- 
stitute my executor, together with Sir John Tokett, Priest, 
and Edward Cheeseman, to each of whom I bequeath xx L 
And I appoint my cousin John Catesby and John Holgrave 



' The testator's daughter Elizabeth married Richard Fowler, 
Esquire, 

^ His daughter Alice was the wife of George Puttenham, Es- 
quire. 

A A 2 



350 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

overseers of this my wil]^ and they to have x /. each for 
their labour and advice. Proved February 15th, 1485*. 



ANN DUTCHESS OF BUCKINGHAM. 

Ann Dutchess of Backs'. My body to be buried in the 
Collegiate Church of Plessy. I will that wheresoever I 
shall happen to die that my executors cause my body to be 
carried as secretly as conveniently they can into the said 
Church, setting all pomp and pride of the world apart^ so 
that the cost thereof and of my obit amount not to above 
c /. ; also I will that in all haste after my decease every 
priest in Sion« as also in the Charter House of London, 
and the Charter House of Shene, have each of them xx d. 
to pray for the soul of my most dear and best beloved hus- 
band Humphrey late Duke of Buckingham, my own soul, 
and all my childrens' souls, in five masses, to he said and 
sung by every of the said priests with five diriges for the 
said souls; Item, I will that the Anker* in the Wall beside 
Bishopsgate, London, have vi«. viii J. to pray in twenty 
masses for the souls before mentioned, and to say twenty 
diriges for them ; to my son of Buckingham >, a pair of 
basons gilt, and a bed of the salutation of our Lady, with 
the hangings of the chamber of Antelopes; to my daugh* 
ter Beaumond*, a pair of basons of silver covered partly 



* Query, 1485-6? ^ From the abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. 
iv. pp. 73 to 76- , 

> She was the daughter of Ralph Neville, Earlof Westmoreland, 
K. G. and married, first, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Bucking- 
ham, K. G. ; and secondly, Wsdter Blount, Lord Montjoy, whose 
will 18 inserted in p. 334 ; and died 520th September 148a 

* Query, Anchorite ? 

s Henry Duke of Buckingham, K. G. her grandson, son of Sir 
Humphrey Stafford, who died v. p. 33 Henry VI. 

* Joane, who married, first, William Viscount Beaumont ; and 
secondly, Sir William Knevet, of Buckenham, in Norfolk, Knt. 



TB8TAMENTA VEJUSTA, 35? 

gilt, wherein I used to wash ; to my son of Wiltshire * a 
spferver *, called a bed, of red velvet, party gold, with a coun- 
terpart to the same of scarlet ; to my daughter of Rich- 
mond^ book of English called '' Legenda Sanctorum," a 
book of French called ** Lucum," another book of French 
of the Epistles and Gospels, and a Primer with clasps of 
silver gilt covered with purple velvet; to my daughter 
Montjoy a pair of pottle' pots of silver; to my daughter 
Beaumond the profit of the manor of Fakenhain Alpes for 
a year, now in my hands by reason of the nonage of my 
daughter Montjoy^; to my daughter Beaumond's son Ed- 
ward Knyvet c /. And I appoint John Morton, Bishop of 
Ely, the Lord Hastings, the Lord Dinham, Sir Thomas 
Bourchier, Sir Thomas Montgomery, William Huse, and 
John Clop ton, my executors *. Proved Slst October 1480. 



ELIZABETH LADY LATIMER. 

In the name of God, &c. I, Dame Elizabeth Latimer^ 
£8th September 1480, 20 Edward IV. lauded and thanksbe 
our said gracious and blessed Lord God, being in Christian 
belief, and of whole mind, though by the same our good 

■ John Stafford, Earl of Wiltshire, K. G. 

* Archdeacon Nares, in his invaluable Glossary, thus explains 
this expression : ^< Sparver, the canopy or tester of a bed ; evi- 
dently so from the context, though I have not found it in any 
other author, nor in any dictionary.'* The example in the text 
confirms the learned editor's conjecture more fully than the pas- 
sages he has cited in support of it : it is very doubtful if the 
words *' called a bed," are not introduced by Dugdale in explana- 
tion ; and the original expression appears to have been << a sperver 
of red velvet," &c. 

' Archdeacon Nares also informs us that the word pottle gene- 
rally means two quarts, but that it is sometimes usedjfor drinking 
vessels, without reference to the measure. 

* By her second husband. 

* FVomDugdale's Abstract, vol. i.p. 1679 and MS.not^s of thiswilK 
s She was the daughter of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of War- 
wick, K. G. by his first wife Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir of 
Tliomas Lord Berkley ; she married George Nevill, I^rd Latimer. 



358 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

and gracious Lord's Visitation I be, and liave beeo/rig^ 
fervently grieved in bodie with sickness^ to me most heartily 
welcome, of and by his soude >, ordain and make and declare 
this my last will and testament. First, I commit and be- 
take my soul to the mercy and pity of the most gracious 
and merciful Lord my Creator and Maker my Lord God ; 
my body to be interred4in the Chapel of our Lady in the 
Collegiate Church at Warwick, which the right famous 
renowned honourable and Christian Prince of noble me- 
mory my Lord my father Sir Richard Beauchamp late Earl 
of Warwick, caused and ordained to be made, and that my 
said body be laid over both the head of my said Lord and 
father, between my natural bom son Harrie Latimer*, and 
Oliver Dudley, late my son-in-law '; and I will that there 
be four several stones of fair marble, with images upon 
them of copper, and gilted, convenable and convenient for 
mine estate and their degrees, with the epitaphs of our 
births and deceases, and other meetly things, to such pur- 
pose written upon the same stones, be purveyed and laid 
upon us, and the like stone upon my Lord my husband ; 
moreover I will and especially charge that the Reverend 
Father in God William Bishop of Durham S and other 
whom I enfeoffed certain manors, lands, &c« to fulfil my 
will, and also John Hugford, son and heir to Thomas Hug- 
ford, feoifee and surveyor of my Lord my father's feoffment 
of all the castles, 8cc. as well as of the lands, 8ic. put in 
feoffment by me, dp first and principally content and pay 
to creditors and other persons unto whom I am indebted, 

* Query, Archdeacon Nares cites the word Soud from Shak* 
speare, but states that the meaning is unknown. It is impossible it 
could have been used in the instance alluded to in the same sense 
as is intended in the text, where it is manifestly synonymous with 
permission, 

* Sir Henry Latimer, her eldest son, was slain at the battle of 
Edgcot, vita patris, 9 Edward IV. 

' Dugdale merely says that she had a daughter, who died s.p. ; 
it would appear from this bequest that she married the said Oliver 
Dudley. 

* William Dudley, who was probably related to her son-in-law^ 
just mentioned. 



TE0TAMENTA VBTUSTA. 359 

in discharge of my soal against God» and the aame my 
creditors; I will that lands to the yearly value of x/. he 
applied to the sustenacion of a priest daily and yearly say 
ing masses and other divine service at the aJtar in the 
aforesaid Chapel of oar Lady, to the laud of God, and to 
the remissipn of the offences of my said Lord and father, of 
my Lady my mother, my Lord my husband, mine own, 
mine sons, and of all Christian people, until such time that 
with the King's licence and other lawful and necessary 
things, lands to the yeariy value of x /. be amortized to the 
effect aforesaid ; and forasmuch as my daughter Dame 
Katherine * hath no livelode nor other sustenance to find 
her meat, drink, and clothes, nor other necessaries during 
my life, I will succour, help, and find her^ as I may, and as 
I am naturally bound to do, and will that after my de^ 
pease she have the lordships and manors of Stowe, in 
Northamptonshire, the manor of Tetcote with Puke, Ho- 
lywell and Lurkbere, in the County of Devonshire, the 
lands and tenements in Bruggewart, in the county of So- 
merset, and will and charge, that in any wise and without de-^ 
layi or as hastily and soon as it is goodly, that there be 
made a sufficient and lawful estates thereof by my feoffees, 
so that I may see and know that she be surely purveyed for 
in my life, if may conveniently so soon be done, or else 
that such estate be made to my said daughter, or to her 
use immediately after my decease ; also I bequeath to my 
said daughter towards her finding c L of the lawful money 
of England ; to the Church and parishioners of Slow c L 
in recompense of tithes and oblations forgotten and not 
paid; furthermore I will that there be bought a pair of 
goodly vestmeqis of white damask> powdered with bears 
and ragged staves * of gold, and in the o'fraie ' my scut- 
cheon, to be well and richly embroidered, given and deli- 
vered to the said Chapel in Warwick; a vestment of black 



i^Mli^i^i^*^R«i^>^»^^)^*^^^P^^i?«W«ra^^-««pMi^lMfMVtt^a^«i^^^M 



* Vide note % p. 358. It seems almost certain that she had two 
daughters, for if her daughter Katherine had been a widow, it is 
not likely she would have been so unprovided for as her mother 
describes her to have been. 

^ The crest of the Beauchamps Earls of Warwick, her ancestors. 

' Query, vide infra. 



360 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

stuflT witb a like scutcheon ia the orfraie, to be used in the 
Church for my lord my husband's soul; and whereas di- 
vers persons have before this time given me right good and 
loving counsell, service, and attendance, and some of 
them for my sake and good • • • • that they have hoped 
and trusted to have of me, have right diligently demeaned 
themselves to my ease and pleasure, as well in my body 
health as in other business, to my profit, with other accept- 
able, good and thankful demeaning towards me, hath, 
according to reason, caused me to grant unto some of them 
annuities and fees, as is apparent in my patents to them, 
under my seal of mine arms, and my sign manual, made 
and granted, which annuities and fees I will be truly paid 
accordingly ; the names of which persons hereafter doth 
follow : Thomas Stafford, John Wake the elder, Agnes his 
wife, William Catesby, William Wake, Thomas Limierick, 
Richard Market, John Wake the younger, Thomas Wake, 
William Crabb, William Trussell, Henry Davy, William 
Gascoigne, Thomas Pye; I will that after my debts be 
paid that my feoffees make an estate of lands and tenements 
to the yearly value of c /. ; to Thomas Nevill ', younger 
son to Sir Henry Nevill, late my son, for term of life ; also 
I charge my feoffees, as they will answer at the day of doom, 
that if there be any of my blood lett, or any other creature 
lett or intercept the execution of this my will, that my feof* 
fees, 8ic. sell all my castles, manors, lands, &c. to those that 
will give most for them, the money to be disposed of in the 
performance of this my will and in deeds of charity. And 
I appoint, depute, and make my executors William Has- 
tings, Knight, Lord Hastings, John Sapcote, Esquire 
for the King's Body; William Catesby, Esquire; Mr. 
John Browne, one of the Masters of the Chauncery ; Tho- 
mas Stafford, Esquire ; John Wake, Esquire ; Thomas Li- 
merick; Mr. Crabb; and I require them to do in the 
premises as they would be done for if they were in like case, 
as they will answer before God at the day of judgment ; 
and to be surveyors of this my last will the high and mighty 



' Who married Aiine, daughter of Robert Greville, and was seated 
at Mathon, in the county of Worcester. 



TKBTAMENTA VETUSTA. S6l 

Prince Richard Doke of Gloucester » ; John Morton, Bi- 
shop of Ely ; William Hastings, Knight, Lord Hastings ; also 
I will that mine executors, that take upon them the execu* 
tion of this my will, be rewarded for their labour and dili- 
gence, by the discretion of my surveyor; I will that Wil- 
liam Catesby^ John Wake, and Thomas Limerick, have the 
receipt of all my lands put in feofiment, and to make ac- 
count by the year before the surveyor of this my will ; and 
I will that John Hugford, son and heir to Thomas Hug- 
ford, feoffee and surveyor of my Lord my father's feoffment, 
do make a lawful estate of the best lands and tenements to 
the yearly value of c marks to Dame Katharine, my daugh- 
ter, for term of her life ; also I will and charge my execu- 
tors that they put them in that I have St. Gre- 
gory's great trental said for me incontinent after iny de- 
cease, in all goodly haste possible ^ I will that the parson of 
Stowe have c /• that he may truly keep* my obit, or do it 
to be kept ; I will that my feoffees make a lawful estate of 
XX /. by the year to William Hastings, Knight, Lord Hast- 
ings, of such of ihy lands as it shall please the said Lord 
Hastings, for his annual fee of xx /. by me to him granted 
and given afore time; also I will that the Rood in the Wall 
at Northampton have c$.; to the Grey Friars in Warwick, 
to pray for me xlvis, viii J.; also I will that Joice Shel- 
don have in reward for her good service c marks ; to Anne 
Sheldon, for her good service, to her marriage c marks ; to 
Janet Palmer c marks ; to Richard Wake yearly v marks ; 
and to John Wake v marks, sons to John Wake, of Stow- 
ton. Squire, for term of their lives ; I will that my godson 
John Danniel have v marks of money, and also my god- 
daughter Elizabeth Arden ▼ marks of money; also I will 
that every of my servants be rewarded and seen to accord- 
ing to their deserts and deserving, by the discretion of my 
feoffees or executors; also I will that the Minories of 
London have xxiiis. viii^?. ; and also Dame Maud Lewes 
have xLvis. viiiJ.; and Dame Margaret Lewes xlvis. 
VIII rf. of money. 

■ Afterwards King Richard III. 



399 TS9TAMENTA VSTU8TA. 

Tb^ aforeeaid EUzabelh came to the King's Cham^eTy 
at WestDdioster 2Sd September, in the said year, and 
acknowledged the said will ** 



^w* 



SIR THOMAS LYTTELTON, KNT. 

In the name of God, Amen, I, Thomas LytteltonS 
Knight, oon of King's Justice of the Common Place, 
make my testament and notifie my wille, In the manner 
and forme that foUoweth. First, I beqneth my soul to 
Almighty God, Fader, Sonne, and HoUye Ghost, three x>er-* 
sons and oon God, and our Lorde, maker of Heven and Ertb, 
and of ali the woride; and to our most Blessed Lady and 
Viiigin, Saynt Mary, moder of Our Lord, and Jesu Christ, 
the only begotten sonne of our saide Lorde God, the Fader 
c»f Heven, and to Saint Christopher, the whiche our saide 
Lorde did trqste to here on his shouldres, and to all the 

♦ Karl. MSS. 853, f. 131. 

* The celebrated Judge and author of the well-known Treatise 
on Tenures. After studying in the Inner Temple he was, in 1450, 
called to the degree of a Serjeant at Law, and in the following 
year was appointed King's Serjeant, and acted as Justice of the 
Assize in the Northern Circuit : he was High Sheriff of Worcester- 
shire in 1447« and though evidently favoured by Henry VI. he 
contrived, either by tergiversation or extraordinary merit, to be 
be still farther advanced in honours by Edward IVn and it may be 
inferred from his having sued out twp general pardons, the one 
from Henry,, apparently for his attachment to the House of York^ 
and the second from Edward for his services to that of LaQcaster« 
that he never allowed his political feeling to interfere with bis in- 
terests. Soon after the latter monarch ascended the throne, Sir 
Thomas was appointed one of the Justices ofthe Court of Common 
Pleas, and had a grant of UO marks annually out of the Customs 
of London, Bristol, and Hull, and 106 s. 10 d. for a robe and furrs, 
and 66 j. for a summer robe. In the 15th Edward IV. he was 
created a Knight ofthe Bath, and died at Frankley in Worcester- 
shire 23d August 1481. 



36$ 

stttnto in Hevea ; and my body to be berried in the tombe 
I lete make for me on the South side of the body of the Ca-^ 
thedrall Church of the Monaatere of our said Blessed Lady 
of Worcester^ under an image of St. Christopher, in caaa 
if I die in Worcestershire. Also, I wuUe, and specially deaire^ 
that immediately after my decesse* myn executors find thre^ 
gode preestB for to singe three trentak for my soole, so thai 
everiah pneest, by himself sing oon trental, and that eve«> 
rish such preest have right. safBciently for his labor ; also 
that mjm executors find another gode preest for tp sing for 
mysoule, fyve masses, and to we; the oiTyce of which be^ 
ginnethy HumiUtmt semel ipnun Daminusjem ChriUus usfun 
ad tnortem ; also I give one bundled shelings by yere> to 
the Priour and Co vent of the said Monasterei out of cer-r 
tain messuages and landes in the cite of Worcester and to 
their successors, to singe at the altar^ hallowed for thfi 
worship of St. George and St. Christopher, daily, at vii io 
the morning, for the f oules of my fader and moder^ and 
for the soul of William Barley, mj £»der-in Jawe ', and f<Hr 
the soul of Sir Philip Chetwin and for all soules that 1 am 
most bounden to pray, and specially for myn own soule 
after my decess^ ; and that everisb such monk aing everish 
Friday, a mass of Requiem, and iidL for faia troubel, to be 
paid him by the handes of the seiiton ; and I wull, that 
whenever the oovent sing the annual Piacebo and Dirige^ 
and Requiem for my soul, and that of my anoestora, that 
they have vf9. vni J. for thyr disport and recreation; I 
wull, that the said oovent have 100 i. for performyu this 
dy vin servyce ; also 1 wulle, that the feoflfees to myn uaCy 
of and in the halfyndele of the manor of BazterJey, and 
Bentley, in Warwickshire, and in Mosele, in the lordship 
of Kingsnorton, and in Stone, besyd Keddermyster^ in 
Worcestershire, make a sure estate unto Richard Lyttelton*, 



p^^"^F^ f r' y^»^i^i^^-^t-»i^«— »»»i^-»^— ^wi^™— '^^— ^-^^"^^^^ 



* Sir Thomas Lyttleton married Joan, the widow of Sir Philip 
Chetwind, of Ingestre, co. Stafford, above-mentioned, and daugh- 
ter and coheir of William Burley, of Bromscroft Castle, co. Salop, 
Esquire, with whom he acquired extensive possessions ; she died 
ZM March 1505, set, 80. 

' His second son, to whom his famous treatise is addressed, and 
who followed his father's profession. 



864f TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my sonnCi and to the heirs of his bodie, with all chartonn, 
munimieDtSi and evidences coDcemyng the same; also I 
wulle, that he have the reversion of the manor of Molston 
besyde Clybery, in the county of Shrewsbury ; also I wuU 
that my said sonne, Richard, have all my state, title, and 
interest that I have in a messuage^ in the parish of St Se- 
pulchres, of London, on the north syde of the saide Church, 
which I holde of the Abbot of Leicester, for term of yeres ; 
also I wull, that the feoffees, to myn use, of and in the ma* 
nor of Spiechley, in Wbrcestershire, make a sure estate to 
my Sonne, Thomas Lyttelton *, and the heirs of his body, 
with all chartours, 8cc. concernyng the same, and all other 
lands, rents, reversions and services, that I have in Spechley, 
Cuddeley, Bradicot, and White-lady Aston, with the lands 
and tenements in Weddesbury, in com. Stafford; I wulle, 
that my wyf have a bason of silver, in the myddes whereof 
been myn arms^ and an ewer of silver, two great salt^alers, 
andakever, weying 93 ounces and |; a standyng plaine 
gilt peece, with a plaine gilt kover, weying 24 ounces and i ; 
six boUes of silver, in the middes of which been enamelled, 
for her using, six monthes of the yere. A standing peece, 
with kever, weying 19 ounces and |, two peeces of silver, 
one covering another, y^ which I occupie at London, a 
powder boxe of silver, a paxeborde, two cruetts, and a sa- 
kering-bell, all of silver ; also I wull, that William Lyttel- 
ton, my Sonne and heire, srhall have a depe washing bason 
of silver, weying 41 ounces, and two saltsalers of silver, with 
a kever tooon of them, weying 31 ounces and^, with ano- 
ther peece, all over gilt, in the myddes of which be in 
eagles, a kover, weying 33 ounces ; also a lowe peece of 
silver, with a kover, embossed in the likeness of roses, wey* 
ing 29 ounces and i ; also he shall have a dosein of my 
best spones ; also I wull, that my sonne Richard have two 
littel gilt saltsalers, with gilt cover to oon, now at London, 



* His third son, who was seated at Spechley, co. Worcester, 
from whom the Lord Keeper Lyttleton, temp. Car. L and Sir Tho- 
mas LyttletoD, Speaker of the House of Commons temp. William 
IIL were descended. 



TESTAMENTA VETU8TA. 365 

also oon littel standyng peece, with a gilt kover, which hath 
at the foote a crown, and another on the kover, weying 22 
ounces, also a standyng gilt nutt, and the best dosein of the 
second sort of my spones ; also I wall, that Thomas Ly ttel- 
ton, my sonne, have two saltsalers of silver, weying 27 
ounces, a standyng peece, weying 21 ounces, gilt, and my 
arms in the myddes of the same; also a boll of silver, em- 
bossed with round bosses, outward, weying 1 1 ounces and 
3 quarters, also he shall have a dosein spones of the third 
sorte; also I bequeth my gode litel mass-book, and gode 
vestment, with the apparyl to an auter, of the same sorte of 
vestments which were my moder's ', and also a giltchales, I 
geve them to the blessed Trinite, to the use and occupation 
of my chapel of Frankley, in honour of our said most 
blessed Trinite, inasmuch as the said Chapel of the blessed 
Trinite, and an aulter thereof, is halowed in the worship of 
the saide blessed Trinite, for to have masse songen there on 
Trinite Sunday, and other high festivals, and other days, to 
the pleasure and honour of our saide most blessed Trinite ; I 
wull, that a bigger cofer, and locke and key be provyded 
for the safe kepyng of these vestments & chales, within the 
Chapel of Frankley, and the Lord of Frankley for the time 
^being have the keping of the said key by himself, or som 
true and faithful person, so that he se that the said masse- 
book, vestment, chales, and apparyl be surely kept, as he 
wull answer to the blessed Trinite; also I wall that the 
great antiphoner be evermore had, and surely kept, in wor- 
ship of God and St. Leonard, to the use and occupation of, 
and for the Chapel-Church of St. Leonard of Frankley ; also 
I wuUe, that all my utensils of myn household, except silver 
plate, as beds, matraces, blanquetts, brushes, tables, all pots 
and chaldrons, and all such things that longith to my kechyn, 

■ Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Thomas Lyttleton, of Frank- 
ley, CO. Worcester, Esquire, Esquire of the Body to Richard IL 
Henry IV. and Henry V. and wife of Thomas Westcote, of De- 
vonshire, Esquire, by whom she had four sons, of whom the three 
younger retained their father's name of Westcote, but the eldest, 
Thomas the testator, assumed the name of his mother's family. 





39! 



r 

n/ uie £/ W 0; mf, dbe «i; 

fee t0Jiwm: *y ifcer fe£, wrslt 
i»^ «aM wifl «i^ soi 

eggt^y>^haA >ttitvar»rT^Uy wisatttUifcciaeoc W^ 
r vifi aia#i ^tri^msace t§, ciac §iie ikd krre 
4^ Tixftak^ vidh die irv»a r&ercof, cmnms hsr bi, 
ar tdf that tike frofczs cWwof «L^ be okcrn aad tepoaed 
M tkktn fiee^t, fee sr soal, br nm exceiZDr, or b^ 
«€her M I irsQ t&er»:?i» a»^z9e; dxrioe her Ef : I wvH 
MT three tottt a£.^ S> Xtopoer Goli^Bydi, pasoa cif 
Bfr>>]ft%^;Tir>Yey Sir Robert Cank, panov of Fn&»M, aad R»> 
ben OxcirTe, be mrn execotoon ; that the tbree int hare 
jrx £ to ow/oej zpetct^ toward their increce sid pro&tx, the 
latter ▼ narks each, of nooej, tntfting ia them that ther 
wan d^ji tbevdilizeot labor to fe that bzt will be performed; 
the wbiehy a^ thej koov wele the perfomun? thereof in 
^odehrhast and tjin, that »bal! be to the hastr ranedie of 
mtj foole; and the long tarring thereof, is to the retaida- 
tJOD cf the mentu of mj sool ' vfaetcfor I nil, that 
ereiycfa of mj saide fooof , to whom mj grete specjal 
troit by as kiod nature sraU, for to performe and execute 
my trill aforetaid ; I wnile that mj trif have mj best 
pkrogh^ and all apparjrl thereto, and ten of my best ploogh 
oxen, andmj be^ sraine; and that WflUamlittdton* have 
my second best traine^ two plongfas, and ten oxen; also I 
tmlle, and speeiatl j desire, that all the money, debts, goods, 
and catdls, that be mjn at tjm of mj deth, over die cost 
and expeosys of myn exeqoies and funeral, and over that 



* Hijielde^sofi,wlioresidedatFnuikley,aiid who was knighted by 
Henry VI I « after the battle of Stoke, for his senrices on that occa- 
sion ; he was ancestor of Sir George Lyttleton, who was created 
Lord Lyttleton in 1757 ; and of William Henry Lyttleton, fint 
Elaron Wcstcote, in Ireland, and who wm created Baron Lyttleton 
nf Frankley, August 13th, 17M, the firther of the present peer. 



TfiBTAlfENTA VBTUBTA. 367 

that is bequetbed by mt in my lif, be sold and disposed for 
my soule, in alms and charitable deeds, that may be most 
profitable and merit to my soule ; also I wuUe, that all my 
beests and qnick cattel, not afore bequetbed, after myn ex- 
equies and funeral, be sold by myn executours and to be 
disposed as they think most expedient for my soule ; I wuU 
and bequeth to the Abbot and Convent of Hales-Oweyn, a 
bok of myn, called Catholicon, to theyr own use for ever; 
and another boke of myn, wherein is contaigned the Con- 
stitutions Provincial, and De gestis Romanorum, and other 
treatis therein^ which I wuU be laid and bounded with an 
yron chayn, in som convenient parte within the saide 
Church, at my costs, so that all preests and others may se 
and rede it whenne it pleasith them ; also I wull and be- 
queth to Sir Richard Howson, my preest, xls. in money, 
and the same to my servant Hawkins ; also I bequeth to 
Dame Jane ', my wyf, xx L in money, in recompense of a 
silver bason, the which was sometym her husband Sir 
Philip Chetwia's* ; to the said dame Jane, my best habytj 
that is to saye, my gown, cloke, and bode ; also to my 
doughter Elyn% my second best habyt, in lyke forme; also 
to Alice, my second doughter, my third best habyt, in lyke 
forme ; also I bequeth my gloset-saulter to the priorie of 
Worcester ; also I bequeth a boke called Fasiculus Morum, 
to the Church at Enfield ; also I bequeth a boke called Me-^ 
dulla Gjrammatica, to the Church of Kingsnorton; also I 
wulle that my grete English boke be sold by myn execu- 
tors, and the money thereof to be disposed for my soul ; I 
bequeth to Thomas LytteUon, my sonne, a little flattepeece 
of silver, with a kover, all over gilt) also to Edward Lyttel- 
ton, my godsonne, a Uttle standing goblet of silver, with a 
kover to the same, all over gilte ; and I wuU^ and specially 
desire my moost betrusted lord, my Lord Bishop of Wor- 
cester % to be overseer of this my will, to be performed, as 

' Vide p. 364. • Vide p, 366. 

' The testator had only two daughters, EUyn and Alice men- 
tioned in his will, both of whom died unmarried. 
* John Alcock, who was translated to the see of Worcester from 



368 TESTAMCNTA VETUSTA. 

my moost special trust is in his gode Lordship ; in witness 
whereof, to this my will, I have sett my scale, theese being 
witnesses. Sir Richard Howson, priest, Roger Hawkyns, 
Thomas Parkess, and others. Written at Frankley, 22 
August, the yere of our Lord Jesu Christ mcccclxxxi *• 



WILLIAM LORD HASTINGS. 

In the name of God, Amen. I William Hastyngs, Knt. 
Lord Hastyngs ', being in hool miode, &c. the 27th day of 
June, in the yere, mcccclxxxi, ordeign, 8cc. my last 
will and testament, as well of my land as of my goods, in 
the forme articulierly following : First, I com'yt and by- 
quethe my sowle unto Almighty God my Maker and Re- 
demer, humbly besechyng hym to accept hit to his mercy 
and grace. And, forasmoche as the Kyng, of his abundant 
grace, for the trew service that I have doon, and at the 
leest entended to have doon, to his grace, hath willed and 
offred me to be buryed in the Church or Chapel of Seynt 
George at Wyndesore, in a place by his grace assigned in 
the which College his highness is disposed to be buryed* ; 

that of Rochester in 1476, and in 1486 was advanced to the Bishop- 
rick of Ely ; he was also Lord Chancellor. 

* From Collins* Peerage, vol. vii. p. 4^9. 

■ He was summoned to Parliament from 1st to S9d Edward IV. 
was Lord Chamberlain and a Knight of the Garter, and was be- 
headed in 14R3 by order of Richard III. His fidelity to the son 
of the sovereign by whom he had been advanced to honours is im- 
mortalized by Shakspeare, and his name is consequently so fami- 
liar to every reader that it is needless to say any thing more about 
so celebrated a personage. 

* llie fact here disclosed places the attachment entertained for 
him by his royal master, and which we have cause for believing 
was returned by fidelity and gratitude, in an afiecting light, and 
justifies Shakspeare*s attributing to him sufficient loyalty to exclaim, 

'' But that I *11 give my voice on Richard's side 
To bar my roaster's heirs in true descent, 
God knows I would not do it to the death." 



T£STAM£NTA VETUSTA. 369 

I therefore bequeth my simple body to be buryed in the 
sayd Chapell and College in the said place^ and wolle 
that there be ordeigned a tumbe convenient for me by 
myne executors ; and for the costs of the same I bequeth c 
marks. Also I wolle that myne executors dispose and gif 
to the ministers of divine service and funerall observances, 
the day of my burying, and to the pore knights there pre- 
sent the same day, and in other dedes of almes, by their 
discretion xx lu of lawful money of England ; also I woU, 
that in all goodly haste after my decease, a juell uf gold or 
sylver, to the value of xxli, be given, to the Deane 
and Chanons of the said Chapell and College, there to re- 
remain perpetually, to the honour of God, and for a memo* 
rial for me; also I lyoU that my feoffees, by the over- 
sight of myne executors, gif and amortize lands to the 
yearly value of xx li. over all charges, to the Deane and 
Chanons aforesayd, and to their successors, to the intent 
that they shall perpetually fynde a preste, to say daylie 
masse and divine service at the awter next to the place 
where my body shall be buryed, in the sayd Chapell or 
College; and there to pray daylie for the King's prosperous 
estate during his life ; and after, his dethe for his sowle, for 
the sowles of me, my wif ', and for alle Christen sowles, &c.; 
and the same Deane and Chanons, and their successors, 
shall daylie finde, &c. brede and wyne, wex, vestiments, 
boke, chalice, and alle other ornaments necessarie for the 
same priests. Sec. and shall kepe a solempne obite yerely in 
the said Chapell and College, at such day, and under such 
forme, as by myne executors and the said Deane and Cha- 
nons shall be ordeigned and agreed ; also I wull that myn 
executors gi£F to the said Deane and Chanons two vest- 
ments, and alle other things thereto belonging, two awter 
clothes, a masse-book, a chalice, a pax brede, and two 
cruets of sylver, to be occupied by the said preste for the time 
being, and his successors, at the said awter ; also I wolle that 
myne executors dispose among pore people, by their discre- 
tion at the day of burying xx li. of lawful money, &c. ; also 



> Katherine, daughter of Richard Nevill, Earl of Salisbury. 

B B 



SyO TESTA MENTA VETUSTA. 

I wolle that myne execators, in all goodly haste after my 
decese, giif to the Abbotand Convent of Sulby, in the county 
of Northampton^ xl/s. of lawful money of England, to 
the relief and increce of the same house, and a soote of 
my best vestments, an awter cloth of like colour to the 
same vestments, a chalice, two candlesticks, two basyns of 
sylver, and other ornaments of the Chirche, to pray for 
the sowles of me, my wyf, myn ancestors there buryed, and 
all other myn ancestours, and alle Christen sowles; also I 
woll that lands and tenements, to the yerely vajew of v 
marks, and the Chirches of Wistow and Lubbenham, be 
lawfully appropriated for ever to the same Abbotand Con«* 
vent, and their successors, for the which the same Ab- 
'bot and Convent, shall do solempnly, with note. Pla- 
cebo and Dirige; and on the morrow, masse of Requiem, 
with note, in the quire of the same Abbey, for the sowles of 
me, my wife, myn ancestors there lying specially, with all 
other my ancestors, and all Christen sowles; and for 
ever the same day yeirly'shall say Placebo and Dirige, and 
masse of Requiem, on the monrow, for my sowle, and the 
sowles afore rehersed ; and for ever, the day of my said 
obit, shall gifFalmes, among pore folke, for my sowle, xx«. 
in money ; and that a preste, being one of the said Con- 
vent, shall daily for ever say a masse of Requiem at an 
awter to be ordeigned, by the discretion of my executors, 
in the said abbey, for my sowle, and for the sowles above 
rehearsed ; and that every preste of the said Convent, say- 
ing masse in the said Abby daily, for ever, say an especial 
collect, in every of their masses, for my sowle and all the 
sowles before reherced, after such ordinance as by me or 
myne executors shal be made ; also 1 will, that myne exe- 
cutors do yerely pay to the same Abbot and his successors 
XXV marks of lawful money, unto the time that lands 
to the value of five marks by yere, and the said Chirches, 
8cc. be lawfully amortized, and appropriated to the said 
Abby; also I woll that myne executors, at the time of 
my buriall, or before, as soone as notice may come to 
thaym of my dethe, shall make a thousand prestes say 
a thousand l^lacebo and Dirige^ with m masses for my 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 371 

sowle; and every preste therefore to have vi d.; and that 
all the same observance be doon in oon day, if hit be rea- 
sonably possible ; also that c lu be disposed amopg pore 
folkes, as soon as it may be conveniently, after my decese ; 
and to the Friers of Notingham, Northampton, Leicestre^ 
and Derby, and to other persons and pore folkes of the 
said shires, by the discretion of my said executors ; also, 
1 bequeath to the Abbot and Convent of Leicestre a soot of 
vestments to the value of xx/i. or else xx/t. of lawful 
money, to syng Placebo and Dirige with note; and on 
the morrow masse of Requiem with note, for my sowle, and 
the sowles afore reherced ; also, I will that the Gray Friers of 
Leicestre x U. have to pray for me ; and either of th'other 
two houses of Friers of the same towne c 5. ; and to every 
parish Church of the same town xl s.; also, I will that the 
Deane and Chapter of the New warke of Leicestre have 
xli. of lawfuU money, to do an obite, and to pray for my 
sowle ; also a jewell of gold or sylver, to the value of x /t. 
there to remayn for a perpetuall memoriall, with aultar- 
clothes and other ornaments to the value of xx It, to pray for 
my sowle ; also, I bequeath to the Bedehous within the same 
CoUedge, x li. to pray for my sowle ; also I woU that myne 
executors do make new and edify the Chapell of our 
Lady, called the Chapell on the Brigge, at Leicestre ; and 
for the making thereof c/i.; also, that they finde a preste 
in the same Chapell by the space of seaven yeres next after 
my decese, to say daily masse, &c. in the same Chapell, and 
other prayers, as shall be ordeigned by myne executors, and 
for the performing thereof; Item, I bequeath to the parish 
Church of Asheby la Zowche a sute and vestments, with an 
awter-cloth accordyng, to the value of c s. to pray for my 
sowle; also, to fynde a preste to say daylie for me 
and the sowles afore reherced, masse there, and other 
prayers, for the doing thereof I bequethe fifty pounds 
of lawfuU money of England ; also I woUe that my gown 
of velvet, to make a vestment of, and c s. of lawful 
money of England, to pray for my sowl and the sowles 
before reherced ; also I wolle that myne executors giff to 

B B 2 



372 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

my sister Dame Elizabetli Donne ' c marks ; also I beqaethe 
to the marriages of my neices, the daughters of John 
Brokesby*, cc marks; alsoy I bequeath to the marriage of 
the daughter of my brother Ferrers', c marks; also where * 
George £rle of Shrewsbury', whose warde and marriage to 
me is granted, hath married Anne my daughter; I woU that 
if the same Erie should die, as God defend, before any car* 
nail knowlydge betwyne the same Erie and her had, that 
then Thomas, brother to the same Erie take to wif her the 
same Anne, if the Law of the Chirche will suffre or license 
hit ; and if it happen the same Anne to die before any 
carnall knowlich, that then ward and marriage of the 
same Erie, and of his said brotuer, be sold, and the 
money thereof comyng, be employed for the performr 
ing of this my will, and for the wele of my soul ; and if it 
happen the said Erie, or, after his dethe, the said Thomas, 
after that be be maryed to the said Anne, do disagree 
to the said marnage, at such age as they may so do by the 
law, then I woUe that myne executors gi£F to my said 
daughter, m lu for her marriage ; also I bequethe to jny 
said doghter plate to the value of fifty marks ; and bed- 
dyng« chamberyngs, and other stuff, for her convenient, 
to the value of c marks, whereof I wolle that she be of the 
age of 18 yeres; also, where ^ I have the ward and mar- 
riage of Edward Trussell, I wolle that it be sold, and 
the money employed to the performing of this my will, 
and for the wele of my sowle ; and if my brother Sir 
John Donne ^ woll be the said ward, I wil( that he 
be preferred therein before any other by xL/t. ; also I 
wolle that my feoffees of the manors of Bewyk and Thur- 

' His sister Elizabeth married Sir John Donne, Knight. 

* Joan, his sister, was the wife of John Brokesby, Esquire, 

' Thomas Ferrers, of Tamworth Castle, Esquire, who married 
his sister Anne. 

* Whereas. 

^ Fourth £arl of Shrewsbury, and a Knight of the Garter; the 
marriage here alluded to was consummated, for by her he left issue, 
among other children, Francis, who succeeded him in his honors. 
Vide supra. 



6 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA, 8^3 

icelby, in Holdernes^ in tbe county of Yorke, Bolton- 
percy in the shire of the citty of Yorke; the manor of 
Barowe, and the hundred of Framland, in the countie of 
Leicestre; the maner called Everingham-feey in tbe county 
of Nottingham, the maner of Fynchley, in the county of 
Middlesex, the rape of Hastyngs, in the county of Sussex, 
shall suffer myne executors to take the issues thereof, 
unto the time, 8cc. thait they have performed this my will, 
and payd my debts, &c.; also I wille that my feoffees of the 
tnaners of Lamley and Bleseby, in the county of Netting- 
ham, the maner of Drakenage, in the countie of Warwick, 
the maner of Sutton in Holdemesse, make estate thereof to 
Richard my son, when he cometh to tbe age of 18yeres, to 
have to hym and to the heires of his body; the remaynder 
to the heires male of my fader's body; the remaynder to my 
right heires; in like wise, of the maner of Amall, in the 
countie of Nottingham ; Fickney, Little Assbeby, and Bren- 
tyngthorp, in tbe county of Leicestre, make estate thereof, 
to my said son William, when he cometh to the age of 18 
yeres, and to the heires male of his body; tbe remaynder to 
tbe said Richard my son \ and to tbe heires male of his 
body; the remaynder to the heires male of my fader's 
body; the remaynder to my right heires; also I wolle 
that every of my said two sons have plate to the value 
of c/i.; and either of them chamberyng, beddyng, and 
other stuff convenient for them, &c. to the value of c/i. ; 
also I wille tbs^t my feoffees make estate to Katharine 
my wife, immediately after my decese, of the maners of 
Stoke-Daubeny, Wilberston, and Sutton, in the county of 
Northampton ; the maner of Edmonton in Tottenham in 
the county of Middlesex ; of Kerby, Lubbesthorpe, Braun- 
ston, Bagworth, Tborneton, and tbeparke of Bagworth and 
Kerby, in tbe countie of Leicester; of the manors of Wel- 
borne and Aslakby, in the shire of Lincolne^ for terme 



■ This Richard was afterwards knighted, and left issue two 
daughters, his coheirs ; viz. Elizabeth, wife of John Beaumont, of 
Gracedieu, co. Leicester, Master of the Rolls ; and Mary, who 
married Thomas Saunders, of Harringworth, in Northamptonshire. 



374 TE8TAMENTA VETUSTA. 

of ber life; so that the sayd Katheriney &c. relese her 
dower in all the sayd inaners of Bewyk, Tburcelby, 8ic. aad 
lands before assigned to perform my wiU ; also I, in most 
bumble wise, beseche the King's grace to take the go* 
vernaance of my sou and heir ; and as straitly as to me is 
possible, I charge myne heir, on my blessyng, to be fay th* 
full and true to the King's grace, to my lord Prince, and 
and their heires; also I will that myne executors, in 
the disposition of such goods as in generalitie in this my 
will be assigned to be disposed by they m, for the wele of my 
sowie, have tenderly in remembrance and preferment the 
said Abbey of Sulby ; to the intent that they the more spe- 
cially shall pray for the sowles of roe, my wife, and the 
sowles afore reherced *. — And, for the performyng and ex- 
ecutyng of this my last will and testament, I ordeyne &nd 
make myn executors, Kateryn myn entyerly beloved wyflTe, 
myn eldest son Sir Edward Hastyngs*, Knyght; Sir William 
Husee, Knyght, Cheffe Juge of the King's Benche; Rich- 
ard Pigotte, one of the King's Serjants at the Lawe ; and 
for thayr labours and pyne that they shall have for and 
aboute the performyiig and executyng thys my last will and 
testament, 1 wyll that Sir Wylliam Huse and Richard Py- 
gotte have eyther of thaym xl U. of lawfull money of Ing- 
land ; praying and requyring my wyffe and eldest son, and 
the said Huse and Pygotte, to take the charge upon thaym 



» « Thus far Harl. MSS. 3881. p. 19»» 20. For the concludmg 
clause/' adds the venerable Mr. Nichols, in his laboured History 
of Leicestershire, " I am indebted to the kindness of Edward Daw- 
son, Esq. by whom it is communicated, with permission of the Earl 
of Moira, from the original probate at Donington Park.*' 

• Lord Hungerford, jure uxoris, and second Lord Hastings, of 
Ashby-de-la-Zouche ; he died in 1507i leaving George his son and 
heir, who was created Earl of Huntingdon 8th December 1529. 
The present Marquess of Hastings, K. G. as heir general of the said, 
bir Edward, has inherited the Baronies of Hastings, Hungerford, 
Molines, and Botreaux ; and Hans Francis Hastings, the heir male 
of the above-mentioned George first Earl of Huntingdon, claimed 
a^d was allowed the Earldom of Huntingdon in January IS 19. 



TESTAMSNTA VETUSTA. 375 

to 86 thexecucoQ * of this my last will and testament, after 
the true entent thereof, as my specyall trust is in thaym, 
and as they wyll answer before God. And, for the more 
perfite and sure execucion of this my said last wyll and tes- 
tament, [ ordayne and make the Ryght Reverend Fader in 
God John Byshop of Ely * my good JU>rd, and also John 
Lord Dynham my good lord and cosyn, surveyors of this 
my said last wyll and testament ; humbly and most hertely 
besechyng ther good lordships to teke the labor and charge 
therof apon thaym, in whom I put my synguler and special 
trust, for the wele of my sowle ; and for thayr labor, I wyll 
that ey ther of my sayd Lords have xl marks of lawfull mo- 
ney of Ingland. And, in witnesse that thys ys my last wyll 
and testament, I did wryte thys clause and last artycle wyth 
myn own hand at London the xxvii day of June, the yere 
of our Lord God abovesaid, and in the yere of my sove- 
rayneLprd Kyng Edward the I V^^« xxi ; whose good grace, 
in the most humble wise, I beseche to be good and tender 
and gracyous Lord to my sowle, to be good and gracyous 
Soverayne Lord to my wy fe, my son, and myn eyre ', and to 
all my children, whom I charge upon my blessyng to be 
true sogetts* and servants to you my Soverayne Lord under 
God, and to your eyre, and to all your issue ; and beseche 
you, Soverayne Lord, also to be good Lord to my surveyors 
and executors in executing this my last wyll and testament, 
as my most synguler trust is in your good grace before all 
earthly greatnese, as wele for my wyfe and chyldren, and to, 
my executors and surveyors in executyng this my last wyll 
and testament. Signed with my hand, and sealed with the 
seal of myn armys, the daye and yere aforesaid. 



* The execution. 

* John Morton, Master of the Rolls and Lord Chancellor ; he 
was translated to the primacy in 1486, became a Cardinal, and 
died in 1501^ 

' Hoir. « Subjects. 



376 TESTAMENTA VETCJSTA, 



JOHN TERYNGHAM, ESQ. 

John Tervngham, the elder, Sqayer*, Juae 12thy 1484. 
I will that my body be borne to the Church of St. OlniF, in 
Silver Street, London, from thence to the Church of Friars 
Preachers London, and to be there buried. To the Church 
of Terynghani four torches of six pound weight; and I 
will that a cope of green velvet with the orfreys of cloth of 
gold of tissue be provided and given to the said Church to 
Remain to the keeping of my wife and my heirs ; for a di- 
rige and mass for my soul with ringing convenient thereto 
HIS. iind.; to the reparation of the bridges of tfale same 
town Ills, mid.; to the Church Reves of Tyringham, for 
ever, for the sustenation of three tapers of wax weighing^ 
three pounds, to be brought every Sunday before the image 
of the Holy Trinity in that Church in s. iv J. yearly ; for an 
obit to be icept yearly with placebo, dirige, and mass of re- 
quiem, and convenient ringing unto the same, for my soul 
and the souls of my two wives, 1115. ivdF. which I will be 
thus disposed of, that is to say, to the parson there for the 
time being iv dF., to the clerk i d,, to the three ringers iii d,, 
for bread and ale to poor people that come thereto lis.; to 
either church reve there, being at the service and offering 
of mass 1111(2.; to my nephew Thomas Tyringham, of 
Weston, xLv 1 5. viii d, ; to the sister of my wife Elizabeth, 
Joan Iward. And I appoint Sir Guy Fairfax, Knight; 
Thomas Fitzwilliam, Recorder of London ; Elizabeth, my 
wife; Robert Brudenell, Gent.; and Hugh Ive, my execu- 
tors. 



* Of a very ancient family, who lived in the parish of that name 
in Buckinghamshire, and were seated there as early as 1187. Sir 
Roger Tyringham attended Edward I. into Scotland, and his son 
was Sheriff of the County of Bucks 15 Edward IL A Sir John 
Tyringham, probably of this family, was beheaded in 1461 shortly 
after the battle of Wakefield. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. STfJ 



JOHN ST, MAUR, ESQ. 

John St. Maur, Esquire ', October 5th, 1485. My body 
to be buried in the Chancel of the pariah Church of Be- 
kynton. To my wife Elizabeth ; my father Sir Thomas St. 
Maur, Knight; my mother Philippa; my son as yet un- 
married. Proved November 19th, 1485. 



JOHN NEWBURGH, ESQ. 

John Newburgh, senior, Esquire, sgth March 1485. 
My body to be buried in the Conventual Church of Byn- 
don, in a certain marble tomb there built by me in the 
Chapel of the Holy Trinity, at the feet of my father; to 
every son of my son William Newburgh, except John, the 
eldest, XL«.; John Newburgh my son; Thomas Newburgh 
my son, brother of the said John ; to Margaret Loug, my 
daughter, x marks; to Anastacia Frampton, my daughter, 
X marks ; to John Savage, my nephew, xls.; to Elizabeth 
Savage, my niece, a nun at Tarent, x marks ; John Turber- 
ville, the elder, my nephew; to John Fitzjames, my ne- 
phew, son and heir of John Fitzjames and Alice my sister, 
X marks. Proved gth April 1489. 



' Of Rode, in the county of Somerset. He was the son and 
heir of Sir Thomas St. Maur, Knight, by Philippa, daughter of 
Sir Edmund Hungerford : he died vita patris, and his daughters, 
Ann, who married Robert Stawel, Esq. ancestor of the Barons 
Stawel ; and Margaret, the wife of William Bamfield, Esq. whose 
grand-daughter married George Perceval, ancestor of the Earl of 
Egmont, became, on the death of Joan, wife of Sir Robert Drury^ 
daughter and heir of William, their brother, s. p. the heiresses 
of this house. 



378 TSSTAMENTA VETUSTA. 



THOMAS RICARDS, ALIAS FERMOUR. 

Thomas Ricards, alias Fermour, senior, of Whitney, in 
Oxfordshire', September Oth, 1485. My body to be bu- 
ried in the Chapel of St Mary Magdalen, in the Church 
of Whitney. To the altar in the Chancel of the Blessed 
Virgin in that Church, for my tithes forgotten xx /.; to the 
building of the aisle of the blessed Mary Magdalen, in the 
said Church called Carsewell aisle xx/. ; to Em mote, my 
wife*, cc/. with my goods and utensils in my house at 
Whitney; to William, my 9on, cc marks, and all my lands 
in the villages of Cogges and Burford ; to Laurence^ my 
son, cc marks and all my lands in Chadlington ; to Rich- 
ard, my son, cc marks and all my lands in Filkingre and 
Langford; to Alice, John, and Elizabeth Wenman, chil* 
dren of Emmote my spouse, by Henry Wenman, to their 
marriages, xL vn s. ; all the residue of my goods, lands, 
8lc. until my sons come to the age of twenty-one years, I 
bequeath to Emmote, my wife, whom I coofttltate.iuy exe- 
cutrix ; and I appoint Sir Richard Harcourt, Knight, su- 
pervisor of this my wilk Proved 8th November 1485*. 



SIR TJHOMAS ARUNDEL, KNT. 

Thomas Arundell, Knight', October 3d, 1485. My body 
to be buried in the parish Church of Edessdon*; and I will 
that after my debts be paid, my wife remove my bones and 
bring them to the Gray Friars at Dorchester, and that she 
make a goodly tomb over them in the middle of the quire. 
I will that Sir Giles Daubeney, Knight, and other my 
feoffees in my manors and lands of Chideock, Ilbruer, 

* Ancestor of the Right Hon. the Earl of Pomfret. 

* His second wife, daughter of Simkin Hervey, of Hereford- 
shire, Esq. and widow of Henry Wenman. 

* From the Abstract in Collins* Peerage, vol. iv. p. 374. 

* Knight of the Bath, and ancestor to the Right Hon. Lord 
Arundel of Wardour. « Query? 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 379 

Frampton upon Severne, in the counties of Dorset, Somer- 
set, and Gloucester, the which lands were late Dame Ka- 
therine Arundell \ my mother's, make an estate thereof to 
Dame KatherineS my wife, for term of her life; I will that 
my lands of Lanlehedron, and all my other lands in Corn- 
wall and Devon^ do find my children necessaries ; I will that 
my feoffees make an estate of my lands to my Lord Bishop 
of Ely ', my Lord Dinham, my Lady my mother. Dam e 
J^ne Dinham % John Sapcote', Roger Dinham, Charles 
Dinham, and to such others as my Lady Jane Dinham, my 
mother, and John Bycovill, shall think fit ; I will that my 
feoffees marry my children to men and women of worship. 
And I appoint John Arundel, my son and heir, Lady 
Jftne Dinham, and John Bycovill, my executors. 



ANTHONY EARL RIVERS. 

Anthony Woodville, Earl Rivers ^ in the Castle of She- 

' Sir John Arundel, Knt. the testator's father, married to his 
second wife Katherine, widow of William Stafford, of Frbme, Esq. 
and youngest daughter and coheir of Sir John Chideock^ of Chide- 
ock, Knt. which Sir John Chideock was sole heir of the Barony 
of Fitz-Pa3me ; and on his death that dignity became vested in his 
two daughters and coheirs, Katherine, just mentioned, and IVIar- 
garet, the eldest, who married William Lord Stourton, ancestor 
of the present Lord. 

* His wife was Katherine, daughter of Sir John Dynham, Knt. 
who became one of the coheirs to her brother, John Lord Dyn- 
ham, K.G. 

' John Morton was Bishop of Ely from 1478 to 1486, in which 
he was succeeded by John Alcock. 

* Apparently his wife*s mother, Jane, daughter and heir of 
Richard Arches. 

^ His wife's brother-in-law, having married Elizabeth Dinham^ 
widow of Lord Fitzwarine; she married, thirdly. Sir Thomas 
Brandon. 

* Knight of the Garter, and brother-in-law of King Edward IV. 
Dugdale states that he was beheaded at Pomfret Castle in 1483, 
after being a prisoner at Sheriff Horton, in Yorkshire, to which 



380 TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 

riff Hutton, June 2Sd, 1483. I will that my heart be car- 
ried to our Lady of Pue, adjoining to St. Stephen's College, 
at Westminster, there to be buried by the advice of the 
Dean and his brethren, and in case I die South of the 
Trent, then I will that my body be also buried before 
bur Lady of Pue. I will that all the lands which were my 
Lord my father's shall remain to his right heirs, and also 
my cup of gold of columbine ; t bequeath such lands as 
were my Lady Scales * my first wife's, to my brother Sir Ed- 
ward Woodville, and to his heirs male, and in default of 
such heirs male, to the right heirs of my father ; but I will 
that he to whom they shall come, before he take possession 
thereof, deduct d marks to be employed in finding a priest 
to pray for the souls of my late wife the Lady Scales, of 
Thomas her brother, and the souls of all the Scales blood ; 
in helping and refreshing hospitals, and other charitable 
deeds ; also to find a priest for one year, at our Lady of 
Pue, to pray for the souls of those brothers, and all Chris- 
tian souls ; likewise to find another priest to sing at the 
Chapel of the Rodes in Greenwich, to pray for my soul 
and all Christian souls. Also I will that all the apparel for 
my body, and horse harness be sold, and with the money 
that shirts and smocks be bought for poor folk ; I will that 
ray manor of Tyrington Hall in Middleton, with the hun- 
dred of Frebrigge, my manor of Wolverton, in Norfolk^ 
with the advowson of the Church there, and my manor of 

place he was carried by the Duke of Buckingham's Orders. The 
MS. Note of this Will asserts that it was dated January 24, 1485« 
which is impossible, if Dugdale's statement is correct. He died s.p. 
> His first wife was Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Thomas 
seventh Lord Scales, of Nucells, and widow of Henry Bourchier, 
in right of which alliance he styled himself Lord Scales. Sic in 
Dugdale, vol. i. p. 231; but Glover, in Harl. MSS. 807, makes her 
to have been the daughter of Robert fifth Lord Scales, by Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of William Lord Bardolf, i. e. sister of the Tho- 
mas whose daughter Dugdale states her to have been. Many au- 
thorities assert that the last Lord Scales had a son Thomas, who 
died vitapatris s. p. and who is probably the person described in 
the Will in the text as the brother of Lady Scales. 



TESTAM£NTA V£TUSTA. 381 

Rokey in Berkney, be sold^ therewith to found a hospital at 
Rochester for thirteen poor folk; my manor of Grafton. 
And I appoint my Lady Willoughby * late wife of Sir 
Gervase Clifton^ William Tunstal, Robert Poynes, Richard 
Hawte, William Catesby, and Andrew Dimocke^ overseers 
of this my will *. 

SIR WILLIAM CATESBY, KNT. 

William Gatesby, Knight, 1485. My body to be buried 
at Ashby Ledgers ; Margaret my wife f. 



JOHN CATESBY, ESQ. 

John Catesby, of Althorpe, Esquire*. I bequeath my 
manor of Althorp to my nephew John, son of my deceased 
brother Sir William Catesby^ in fee. Proved 1486 f. 



WILLIAM ALINGTON, ESQ. 

William Alington, of Horseheath, Esquire, 1485. My 
wife Elizabeth ; my sons Giles and George ; and Margaret 
my daughter. 

I 

JOHN SHIRLEY. ESQ. 

In Dei, &c. 26tl;i March 1485. I, John Shirley », of 
Staunton Harald, Esquire, whole of mind and body, or- 
dain and make, 8cc. First, I bequeath my soul to God, &c. 

' Vide note « to p. 275. 

* From Dugdale's Abstract, vol. ii. p. 233 ; and a MS. Note of 
this will. 

* Apparently brother of Sir William Catesby above-mentioned, 
t £x inform. George Baker, Esq. 

^ From a laboured pedigree in the MS. just cited, fo. 268, it 
appears he was son and heir of Ralph Shirley, Esq. by Margaret, 



382 TBSTAMENTA V£TUSTA. 

My body to be buried wbere it shall please God/ with my 
due mortuary ; also I will that my debts be fully conteat 
and paid without diminution ; to Alianore, my wife, the 
manors of Brailesford, 8ic. with all the lands, &c. for term of 
her life, in Brailesfordy Bradeley, Burowes, Thurvaston, and 
Coland, with the advowson of the Church of Brailesford, 
the manors of Hooneand Harald Staunton, for term of her 
life, in the name of and for her dower; also I will that every 
of my six younger sons unprovided, have pf the residue of all 
my other manors an annuity of viii marks yearly for term of 
life, and that Alice*, Margaret, Jane^ and Alianore', my 
daughters^ have to their marriages every of them a c mark ; 
also I will that my son and heir Rauf Shirley, have all the 
Iands,8cc.lying within theJordship of Shirley, after the decease 
of me and of my said wife, to him and his heirs for evermore; 
also I will that after my decease my feoffees make an estate 
to Thomas, my son, for term of his life, of the Fostery in 
Hopedale in the Peek; and for the performance and eze* 
cuting of this my present will and testament, I ordain and 



sister and sole heir of Thomas Stanton, of Stanton Harold, and 
who is there said to have re-married Sir Thomas Clinton, Elnt. bro- 
ther of William Lord Clinton and Say. The testator married 
Eleanor, daughter of Sir Hugh Willoughby, of WoUecton, 
KnU and died May 18th, 1485 ; he left issue eight sons, Ralph 
Shirley ancestor of the Right Hon. Earl Ferrers, Hugh, Tho- 
mas, Robert, Richard, Henry (who became Rector of Brailesford 
in Derbyshire), Baldwin, and Nicholas; also the four daugh- 
ters mentioned in his Will, and another daughter, Anna, who 
married John Danvers, of Swithland, in Leicestershire, Esq. It 
appears very doubtful if the statement relative to the second mar- 
riage of Margaret, his mother, to Sir Thomas Clinton, be correct : 
for it is evident, from the Will of Joan Lady Clinton, mother of 
the said Margaret, in p. 284, that she re-married Sir Thomas 
Clinton ; and from this circumstance probably arose the assertion 
in question, but which is not alluded to by Collins in his account 
of the Shirley family, vol. iv. p. 271- 

* Who married Robert Brookesby, of Sholby, in Leicestershire. 

" Afterwards wife of Richard Kniveton, of Bradley, co. Derby. 

' Who married Robert Haselrigg, of Donnington, co. Leicester. 



TESTAMENTA VETUSTA. 383 

make mine executors tbe said Alianore, my trasty and full 
entirely beloved wife; Henry Ferrers, Knight; Henry Wil- 
loughby. Esquire ; and Richard Kniveton the elder; and 
my right singular and full special good Lord John Lord 
Montjoy supervisor of the same^ whom I heartily require 
and pray, as those persons whom I put my most confidence 
and trust in, to execute and perform, as they will answer 
afore the high Judge at the day of doom. In witness hereof 
I have put the seal of my arms *. 



WILLIAM TENHAM, ESQ. 

William Tenham, Esquire, of the parish of George, of 
the City of Canterbury. My body to be buried in the Cha- 
pel of the Blessed Mary in the Church of St. George afore- 
said, at the head of Edward Pargate there ; John William- 
son, Batchelor of Arts, then Rector of St. George's afore 
said t» Proved at Canterbury. 



WILLIAM ROBESART. 

William Robesart, of Minster, in Shepey, 6th July 5 
Richard IH. 1485. I bequeath my lands and tenements 
within the shire of Kent, called Pistoke, to Cecilia, my wife, 

• 
* Harl. MSS. 4028, f. 126. A copy of the seal of the testator, 
as affixed to his testament, is there given. The arms and crest 
are those still used by his descendants : quartering .... sem^e of 
cross crosslets • . • . , a lion rampant^. . • . , apparently the Coat 
of Brewes ; inscribed, " Sigillu' ad arraa Joh'is Shirley, Armiger/* 
The Manuscript just cited is a very extensive and valuable collec- 
tion relative to the family of Shirley, as well as of those houses to 
which it was alUed. 

t The MS. whence the above abstract is taken states that it 
was proved 15th February, 1580; but from its standing between 
Wills dated about the year 1480, it is presumed the date of 1580 
is erroneous. 



•/; .ji 



384 TESTAMBNTA VETUSTA. 

for life, and after her decease, I will that the Prioress and 
Convent in the Isle of Shepey, called St. Sixborough, hare 
all my said lands for evermore, for a solemn obit. Sir 
Maipos, Parson of Mnston. 

Proved 19th Angost 1499, at Canterbury. 



RICHARD TILLEY. 

Richard Tylle, of Sellying, 17th December 1485. My 
body to be buried in the Church of Sellying, before the 
Roode, if I die there. To the making of a new image of 
our Lady in the same Church lxvi«. viiiiI. ; to the buying 
a book called an Antiphonar, or some other jewel, for the 
use of the said Church, vi /. xiiis. ivil.; to the Church of 
Christ in Canterbury xl /. ; to the bouse of the '* Maison 
Dieu," in Dover x /. ; to the Church works of Limne lxvi Sm 
VIII J.; to the Church work of Westhithe lxvis. yiiieL; to 
the house of Grey Friers Preachers in Canterbury xls.; to 
the Austin Freers in Canterbury, and to the Freers 
Preachers there, and to the houses of the White Friers at 
Sandwich XX s. each; also to the building of the Observ- 
vance House at Greenwich cs. ; to the building of the 
praers at Bury ills*; to Eleanor, my daughter, c marcs; 
William, Richard, and John, my sons ; Joan Hony wood, 
Robert Honywode. And I appoint supervisors of my will 
Dr. Selling, new Prior of the Church of Christ ; Master Fi- 
neux. To William, my son, in fee, my place in Sellyng 
that I dwell in, with all the lands thereto lying, and his 
lands oalled Wylmington, Lushiogton, Longehill, Waterys, 
Kingford, Cowelese, and Barnysfielde; to Joane, my 
daughter, wife of Thomas Knight^ my lands in Lyde, 
Bromehill, Newchurch, Aldington, and Westhithe. 

Proved at Canterbury. 



VmW. Of MICHIGAN 



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